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Role and Rights of Women Before and After the Revolution

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Jeffrey Liang

on 24 November 2015

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Transcript of Role and Rights of Women Before and After the Revolution

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Employment, Educational and Political Oppression Against Women in Chinese Society
What employment, educational and political oppression was against women in Chinese society before the Revolution, and what were the advances for them afterwards?
Employment Oppression Against Women in Society
Before the Revolution
Educational Oppression Against Women in Society
Before the Revolution
Political Oppression Against Women in Society
Before the Revolution
-Politically, oppression of women meant
that they didn't have the rights to:
have suffrage (to vote)
stand for election

-Also, no employment/inferior
jobs, lack of education and societal belief of
women inferiority contributed to this
Political Oppression Against Women in Society
Before the Revolution
women were allowed an education since they assisted in the industrialisation
illiteracy rates for women dropped from
90% in 1949 to 24.05% in 1995

-However,
in some rural areas, people think women
are second-rate and that their education is
not invested in
again rurally, some believe rural labour
is more valuable than an education,
therefore they do not receive
one
Educational Oppression Against Women in Society
After the Revolution
Introduction
- Before the Revolution in 1949,
women were thought to be
inferior
subordinate
subservient
to men.
- After the Revolution,
advances for women
in Chinese society
started occurring
when Chairman
Mao came to power
- women in the workforce
was inconceivable because
of:
bound feet
Confucianism ideology
expected domestic life
young marriage
Employment Oppression Against Women in Society
After the Revolution
-When Mao came to power:
women had many more opportunities in the workforce.
-Yet:
not many women hold important positions
there is an uneven distribution of jobs
chances of getting a promotion in these jobs are slim
are maltreated
-Women's rights to an education were ignored as:
if educated, when married they would live with their husband's family
-
The
Common Program
(1949) and the
Electoral
Law
(1953) gave women the rights to:
vote
stand for election

-But today, still,
women are suppressed by the glass
ceiling in politics
cannot reach the higher levels of government
rurally, political empowerment is low
only
two out of 25
members of the Politburo are female
Conclusion
-There have been many advances
for women in the fields of employment,
politics and education since pre-Revolution
times, to after the Revolution, to modern
China.
-However, many issues in each area remain
-As employment, politics and education
are interconnected, if one is improved,
it will create a chain reaction
"Women hold up half the sky."
-Mao Zedong, 1952
"I invite you
to step forward,
to be seen
and to ask yourself..."
"If not me, who?
If not now, when?
-Emma Watson,
2014
Portrait Of Chairman Mao,
1950, photograph, viewed 9 November 2015. Available at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mao_Zedong#/media/File:Mao_Zedong_portrait.jpg
Women and men symbols,
2015, photograph, viewed 9 November 2015. Available at: http://www.clipartbest.com/cliparts/4i9/nAp/4i9nApkiE.png
People's Republic of China flag, 2015, photograph, viewed 9 November 2015. Available at: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Flag_of_the_People's_Republic_of_China.svg
Qiu Ying, Ming Dynasty,
Pounding Clothes, painting, viewed 16 November. Available at: http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/culture/attachement/jpg/site1/20150811/00221910da6c1733a90b59.jpg
Farrell, 2015,
Bound feet
, photograph, viewed 16 November 2015. Available at: http://ak-hdl.buzzfed.com/static/2015-06/18/6/enhanced/webdr08/enhanced-buzz-wide-6590-1434625022-9.jpg
Married Chinese couple, 1890s, photograph, viewed 16 November 2015. Available at: http://factsanddetails.com/media/2/20080225-wedding%201890s%20u%20wash.jpg
Woman with protective gear
, n.d. photograph, viewed 16 November 2015. Available at: http://factsanddetails.com/media/2/20080315-ei03.jpg
Women working in garment factory, 2015, photograph, viewed 16 November 2015. Available at: http://www.wsj.com/articles/chinas-january-manufacturing-gauge-shows-contraction-1422755682
Tang Yin, 1470-1524,
Court Ladies of the Former Shu
, painting, viewed 16 November 2015. Available at: https://nixienyx.makes.org/thimble/LTkxNzUwNA==/ancient-china
China Daily, Students celebrating their graduation,2013, photograph, viewed 16 November 2015. Available at: http://usa.chinadaily.com.cn/china/2013-08/21/content_16909294.htm
Young Chinese girl writes in her book
, 2012, photograph, viewed 16 November 2015. Available at: http://chinadigitaltimes.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/CHINA-EDUCATION_Girls.jpg
Woman working in rural rice fields, 2005, photograph, viewed 16 November 2015. Available at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Globalization_and_women_in_China
Protest campaign in support of Chinese women, n. d. photograph, viewed 16 November 2015. Available at: https://dlacsun.wordpress.com/2012/04/29/treatment-of-women/
Chinese female rural leaders at a conference
, 2006, photograph, viewed 16 November 2015. Available at: http://www.iri.org/web-story/iri-sponsors-rural-women-leaders-conference-beijing
Gross, 2011, Liu Yandong and Hillary Clinton embrace, photograph, viewed 16 November 2015. Available at: http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/pix/2011/04/160638.htm
Women rejoicing n.d. photograph, viewed 16 November 2015. Available at: http://www.armysignalocs.com/veteranssalultes/endofwar.html
"Women hold up half the sky" poster, Mao's reign, photograph, viewed 11 November 2015. Available at: http://blog.voc.com.cn/blog_showone_type_blog_id_545096_p_1.html
Emma Watson at the HeForShe Campaign 2014, 2014, YouTube video, viewed 16 November 2015. Available at: www.youtube.com/watch?v=gkjW9PZBRfk
n.d. photograph, viewed 16 November 2015. Available at: http://www.prisonplanet.com/cnn-tells-masses-that-communism-is-good-for-women-despite-china's-nightmare-legacy.html
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