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The Visual Analytic Essay

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Sean Antonetti

on 5 October 2015

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Transcript of The Visual Analytic Essay

21st Century Essay Writing
The Visual Analytic Essay
W.E.B. DuBois "The Souls of Black Folk"
Text Excerpt
Details (Textual Evidence) #1
Claim #1
What interesting, related details do I find that stand out to me?
Detail Connection#1
Explain the connections between the details that I have found.
Images/Audio/Videos for Support
Choose a mixture of two different mediums. Include APA Citations for each item
In "The Souls of Black Folk." W.E.B. Du Bois argues that, in the time immediately following Emancipation, awareness of two very different populations weakened the work of black artisans, intellectuals and artists. They were aware of both a very developed white population and a generally uneducated and poor black population.


Final Draft
Van Leeuwen, D. (n.d.). Marcus Garvey and the Universal Negro Improvement Association, The Twentieth Century, Divining America: Religion in American History, TeacherServe, National Humanities Center. Retrieved October 31, 2014.
Darby, Blind Teddy (1929). Lawdy Lawdy Worried Blues. [Record]. United States.
Victorian Women of Color. [Image of African-American Woman]. Victorian Women Of Color: A Rare View. Retrieved from http:// http://downtownlalife.tripod.com/id535.html
Victorian Women of Color. [Image of African-American Woman]. Victorian Women Of Color: A Rare View. Retrieved from http:// http://downtownlalife.tripod.com/id535.html
I come up with a conclusion that I can support with evidence from the text
Detail 1: "The Souls of Black Folk" "On Our Spiritual Strivings"
Detail 2: "me and the other world"
Detail 3: "They approach me in a half-hesitant sort of way, eye me curiously or compassionately"
My understanding about detail #1
My understanding about detail #2
My understanding about detail #3
Understanding 1: I think that the title of the book, " The Souls of Black Folk", and the chapter "On Our Spiritual Strivings" establish Du Bois' ethnicity.
Understanding 2: I think that the expression "me and the other world" establishes two distinct groups.
Understanding 3: I think that "They approach me in a half-hesitant sort of way, eye me curiously or compassionately" develops the nature and severity of the distinction between the two groups
My Claim About the Text
Du Bois sees a sharp distinction between the world of black people and the world of others.
Reference: Line 1
Reference: Line 2
Reference: Lines 3-4
Details (Textual Evidence) #2
Claim #2
What interesting, related details do I find that stand out to me?
Detail Connection#2
Explain the connections between the details that I have found.
I come up with a conclusion that I can support with evidence from the text
Detail 1: "a poverty-stricken horde"
Detail 2: "twice-told tale"
Detail 3: "Greek to (their) own flesh and blood"
My understanding about detail #1
My understanding about detail #2
My understanding about detail #3
Understanding 1: I think that the title quote "poverty-stricken horde" establishes one of two different populations in America at the time of the writing of the essay.
Understanding 2: I think that the expression "twice-told tale discusses that both populations, black and white, were going through the same type of situation.
Understanding 3: I think that the quote shows that the white experience was as foreign to the blacks as they had no frame of reference.
Reference: Line 68
Reference: Line 63
Reference: Lines 65-66
How I Connect the Details: The title and language develop a contrast between two distinct groups of people.
1. Establish the Context
2. State Your Claim Clearly
3. Organize Your Supporting
Evidence
4. Collect Images, Videos or
Audio for Support
5. Paraphrase and Quote
6. Reference Your Evidence
The "How To"
My Claim About the Text
Du Bois shows that blacks were torn between two different ideals.
How I Connect the Details: The contrast between
the two groups of people is furthered developed with information about affluent whites and intellectual blacks.
Federline, Nick et.al. The Typical African American Life. Retrieved October 31, 2014.
What was needed by their own people- "a poverty-stricken horde" - was to white people, simple and basic- a "twice-told tale" (63, 68). Furthermore, white people misunderstood and even despised black ideals and beauty (69-72). On the other hand, black intellectuals and artists did not share the experience of the white population. Blind Teddy Darby's song, "Lawdy Lawdy," encapsulates the feeling of the plight of the black intellectual at this time, best expressed in the lyrics "been treated like a dog". The weariness of the dog parallels the weariness of the intellectual. White experience was "Greek to (their) own flesh and blood" and white standards were not those of their own people (69, 65-66).
As such, black artists and intellectuals, such as Du Bois himself and others like Marcus Garvey, were caught in between, facing "Two unreconciled ideals" (73). The position "wrought sad havoc" with their courage and faith and deed" (74). At the very least, they were confused and unproductive. At the worst, they were tempted "toward quackery and demagogy" (65). Diffused and fraudulent, they did not live up to their own potential or to the "criticism of the other world" (65-66). Often, they ended up "ashamed of themselves" (76).
Choose a mixture of two different mediums. Include APA Citations for each item
Images/Audio/Videos for Support
"Thanksgiving Day Lesson at Whittier"Frances Benjamin Johnston Collection Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.
Frances Benjamin Johnston Collection (Library of Congress).
Alain Locke. N.d. National Endowment for the Humanities, Washington D.C. BlackPast.org. Web. 31 Oct. 2014.
"Lumpers" at the T.B. Williams Tobacco Co., Richmond, Virginia, 1899? 1899. Library of Congress, Washington D.C. Library of Congress. Web. 31 Oct. 2014.
Family and Oxen, 1899. Library of Congress, Washington D.C. Library of Congress. Web. 31 Oct. 2014.
Art Media Detail #1
Claim #1
What details of the art medium stand out to me?
Detail Connection#1
Explain the connections between the details that I have found.
I come up with a conclusion that I can support with evidence from the medium.
Medium Detail 1: The image stands out to me because the it shows the tight working conditions and poor areas blacks worked in.
Medium Detail 2: The men in the picture seem to be tired.
My understanding about detail #1
My understanding about detail #2
Understanding 1: I think that the image connects to the text idea of the struggling African-American
Understanding 2: I think that weariness is shown in the men's eyes. The white supervisor does not seem to be tired, showing he does not know his workers plight.
My Claim About the Text
The image of the workers echoes the plight of the lower class African American.
How I Connect the Details: The images show the misunderstood African American worker in their White counterparts eyes.
Art Media Detail #2
Claim #1
What details of the art medium stand out to me?
Detail Connection#1
Explain the connections between the details that I have found.
I come up with a conclusion that I can support with evidence from the medium.
Medium Detail 1: The song's tone has a fatigued feeling.
Medium Detail 2: The slow cadence in the song echoes the slow movement of civil rights.
My understanding about detail #1
My understanding about detail #2
Understanding 1:
Understanding 2:
My Claim About the Text
How I Connect the Details:
RI.1 11-12 (cite evidence to
support analysis of explicit and inferential textual meaning).

RI.2 and RI.3 (determine a
central idea and analyze how it is conveyed and
elaborated with details over the course of a text).

The evidence-based writing pieces involve
W. 11-12.4 (produce clear and coherent writing in which
the development, organization, and style are
appropriate to task, purpose, and audience).
Task:
Using Prezi, create an interactive, analytic essay in which
you make evidence based
claims , using evidence
from the text and artistic
media from various
sources, about W.E.B. Du Bois'
seminal work, "The Souls of Black Folk"

5 Class Periods- 2 Weeks
Rationale
Shift from Multiple-Choice and persuasive writing
Alignment to rigorous Common Core State Standards.
Movement to writing with textual support.
Movement from paper and pencil test to technologically enhanced assessments
Movement to complex and extended reasoning
Presenter: Sean Antonetti

Walkthrough!

Thanks for listening!
Sean Antonetti
sean.antonetti@clayton.k12.ga.us



Drafting Pages
Drafting Pages
Resources:
http://goo.gl/K25p8i
Between me and the other world there is ever an unasked question: unasked by some through feelings of delicacy; by others through the difficulty of rightly framing it. All, nevertheless, flutter round it. They approach me in a half-hesitant sort of way, eye me curiously or compassionately, and then, instead of saying directly, How does it feel to be a problem? they say, I know an excellent colored man in my town; or, I fought at Mechanicsville; or, Do not these Southern outrages make your blood boil? At these I smile, or am interested, or reduce the boiling to a simmer, as the occasion may require. To the real question, How does it feel to be a problem? I answer seldom a word.

And yet, being a problem is a strange experience,—peculiar even for one who has never been anything else, save perhaps in babyhood and in Europe. It is in the early days of rollicking boyhood that the revelation first bursts upon one, all in a day, as it were. I remember well when the shadow swept across me. I was a little thing, away up in the hills of New England, where the dark Housatonic winds between Hoosac and Taghkanic to the sea. In a wee wooden schoolhouse, something put it into the boys' and girls' heads to buy gorgeous visiting-cards—ten cents a package—and exchange. The exchange was merry, till one girl, a tall newcomer, refused my card,—refused it peremptorily, with a glance.
Then it dawned upon me with a certain suddenness that I was different from the others; or like, mayhap, in heart and life and longing, but shut out from their world by a vast veil. I had thereafter no desire to tear down that veil, to creep through; I held all beyond it in common contempt, and lived above it in a region of blue sky and great wandering shadows. That sky was bluest when I could beat my mates at examination-time, or beat them at a foot-race, or even beat their stringy heads. Alas, with the years all this fine contempt began to fade; for the words I longed for, and all their dazzling opportunities, were theirs, not mine. But they should not keep these prizes, I said; some, all, I would wrest from them. Just how I would do it I could never decide: by reading law, by healing the sick, by telling the wonderful tales that swam in my head,—some way. With other black boys the strife was not so fiercely sunny: their youth shrunk into tasteless sycophancy, or into silent hatred of the pale world about them and mocking distrust of everything white; or wasted itself in a bitter cry, Why did God make me an outcast and a stranger in mine own house? The shades of the prison-house closed round about us all: walls strait and stubborn to the whitest, but relentlessly narrow, tall, and unscalable to sons of night who must plod darkly on in resignation, or beat unavailing palms against the stone, or steadily, half hopelessly, watch the streak of blue above.

After the Egyptian and Indian, the Greek and Roman, the Teuton and Mongolian, the Negro is a sort of seventh son, born with a veil, and gifted with second-sight in this American world,—a world which yields him no true self-consciousness, but only lets him see himself through the revelation of the other world. It is a peculiar sensation, this double-consciousness, this sense of always looking at one's self through the eyes of others, of measuring one's soul by the tape of a world that looks on in amused contempt and pity.
One ever feels his twoness,—an American, a Negro; two souls, two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings; two warring ideals in one dark body, whose dogged strength alone keeps it from being torn asunder.

The history of the American Negro is the history of this strife,—this longing to attain self-conscious manhood, to merge his double self into a better and truer self. In this merging he wishes neither of the older selves to be lost. He would not Africanize America, for America has too much to teach the world and Africa. He would not bleach his Negro soul in a flood of white Americanism, for he knows that Negro blood has a message for the world. He simply wishes to make it possible for a man to be both a Negro and an American, without being cursed and spit upon by his fellows, without having the doors of Opportunity closed roughly in his face.

This, then, is the end of his striving: to be a co-worker in the kingdom of culture, to escape both death and isolation, to husband and use his best powers and his latent genius. These powers of body and mind have in the past been strangely wasted, dispersed, or forgotten. The shadow of a mighty Negro past flits through the tale of Ethiopia the Shadowy and of Egypt the Sphinx. Through history, the powers of single black men flash here and there like falling stars, and die sometimes before the world has rightly gauged their brightness. Here in America, in the few days since Emancipation, the black man's turning hither and thither in hesitant and doubtful striving has often made his very strength to lose effectiveness, to seem like absence of power, like weakness. And yet it is not weakness,—it is the contradiction of double aims. The double-aimed struggle of the black artisan—on the one hand to escape white contempt for a nation of mere
hewers of wood and drawers of water, and on the other hand to plough and nail and dig for a poverty-stricken horde—could only result in making him a poor craftsman, for he had but half a heart in either cause. By the poverty and ignorance of his people, the Negro minister or doctor was tempted toward quackery and demagogy; and by the criticism of the other world, toward ideals that made him ashamed of his lowly tasks.

The would-be black savant was confronted by the paradox that the knowledge his people needed was a twice-told tale to his white neighbors, while the knowledge which would teach the white world was Greek to his own flesh and blood.

The innate love of harmony and beauty that set the ruder souls of his people a-dancing and a-singing raised but confusion and doubt in the soul of the black artist; for the beauty revealed to him was the soul-beauty of a race which his larger audience despised, and he could not articulate the message of another people. This waste of double aims, this seeking to satisfy two unreconciled ideals, has wrought sad havoc with the courage and faith and deeds of ten thousand thousand people,—has sent them often wooing false gods and invoking false means of salvation, and at times has even seemed about to make them ashamed of themselves.
Away back in the days of bondage they thought to see in one divine event the end of all doubt and disappointment; few men ever worshipped Freedom with half such unquestioning faith as did the American Negro for two centuries. To him, so far as he thought and dreamed, slavery was indeed the sum of all villainies, the cause of all sorrow, the root of all prejudice; Emancipation was the key to a promised land of sweeter beauty than ever stretched before the eyes of wearied Israelites. In song and exhortation swelled one refrain—Liberty; in his tears and curses the God he implored had Freedom in his right hand. At last it came,—suddenly, fearfully, like a dream. With one wild carnival of blood and passion came the message in his own plaintive cadences:—
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