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M3:U2:L4

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Bob Weekes

on 14 March 2018

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Transcript of M3:U2:L4

Warm-up: Write down Learning Targets at the top of page 11:
1) • I can provide the strongest evidence from Unbroken as I analyze why some Japanese guards treated prisoners of war brutally during WWII.
2) • I can analyze how the ideas of Japanese society contributed to how some Japanese guards treated prisoners of war during WWII

Warm-up: Complete the Writing Journal for Wednesday:
1) • I can provide the strongest evidence from Unbroken as I analyze why some Japanese guards treated prisoners of war brutally during WWII.
2) • I can analyze how the ideas of Japanese society contributed to how some Japanese guards treated prisoners of war during WWII

Engaging the Reader: Resisting Invisibility (10 minutes)
• Louie and the other POWs resist the efforts of the Japanese guards to make them invisible.
• Skim through pages 180-189 (HINT 182 HINT)
* “What instances did you see in the text when the POWs resisted efforts to make them invisible?”



• “Once, driven to his breaking point by a guard jabbing him, Louie yanked the stick from the guard’s hands. He knew he might get killed for it, but under this unceasing degradation, something was happening to him. His will to live, resilient through all of the trials on the raft, was beginning to fray.” Explain that Louie’s grabbing the stick from the guard was an extreme act of resisting being dehumanized.
Add pattern card to your pattern folder. LABEL IT AS "RESISTANCE"
Learning Targets (5 minutes)
– “I can provide the strongest evidence from Unbroken as I analyze why some Japanese guards brutally treated prisoners of war during WWII.”
– “I can analyze how the ideas of Japanese society contributed to how some Japanese guards treated prisoners of war during WWII.”

• Not all Japanese guards treated prisoners of war brutally. Many of the guards described in the book did treat Louie harshly. Historians have studied why some guards were so harsh to prisoners of war. They discovered that the values of the Japanese society during that time affected the way some Japanese guards treated prisoners.
• We are studying the question of how war affects individuals and societies by specifically studying Louie’s experiences in the book Unbroken, this aspect of the story is important to understand. The mentality that it’s okay to be awful to someone “lower” than you is not limited to the Japanese—this is a universal human failing, and one thing war does is accentuate universal human behaviors
Written Conversation: Understanding How Society Affects the Individual
“In the last paragraph on page 194, going on to the top of page 195, Hillenbrand describes one reason some Japanese guards may have been so brutal to POWs. What was this reason and why do you think it contributed to such brutality by some?”
In Japan’s militaristic society, all citizens, from earliest
childhood, were relentlessly indoctrinated with the lesson
that to be captured in war was intolerably shameful. The
1941 Japanese Military Field Code made clear what was
expected of those facing capture: “Have regard for your
family first. Rather than live and bear the shame of
imprisonment, the soldier must die and avoid leaving a
dishonorable name.” As a result, in many hopeless battles,
virtually every Japanese soldier fought to the death. For
every Allied soldier killed, four were captured; for every 120
Japanese soldiers killed, one was captured. In some losing
battles, Japanese soldiers committed suicide en masse to
avoid capture. The few who were captured sometimes gave
false names, believing that their families would rather think
that their son had died. The depth of the conviction was
demonstrated at Australia’s Cowra camp in 1944, when
hundreds of Japanese POWs flung themselves at camp
machine guns and set their living quarters afire in a mass
suicide attempt that became known as “the night of a
thousand suicides.” The contempt and revulsion that most
Japanese felt for those who surrendered or were captured
extended to Allied servicemen. This thinking created an
atmosphere in which to abuse, enslave, and even murder a
captive or POW was considered acceptable, even
desirable.

This tendency was powerfully reinforced by two opinions
common in Japanese society in that era. One held that
Japanese were racially and morally superior to nonJapanese,
a “pure” people divinely destined to rule. Just as
Allied soldiers, like the cultures they came from, often held
virulently racist views of the Japanese, Japanese soldiers
and civilians, intensely propagandized by their government,
usually carried their own caustic prejudices about their
enemies, seeing them as brutish, subhuman beasts or
fearsome “Anglo-Saxon devils.” This racism, and the hatred
and fear it fomented, surely served as an accelerant for
abuse of Allied prisoners.
Anti-American
Anti-Japanese
Title/claim: Captors made POW's feel literally invisible

Context: After Louie and Phil are dropped off on Kwajalein on July 16, they are led by the Japanese while blindfolded.

Quote: "Louie's back struck a wall, and he fell to the floor...A door slammed, a lock turned" (174).

This shows: Louie has been thrown into a cell without realizing where he is.

This proves captors made POW's literally invisible because Louie has been placed away and isolated from the rest of society. His family doesn't know where he is or if he's alive.
Pattern Card #1
Using the figurative invisibility notes on page 7 of your binder, complete a figurative invisibility pattern card
Title: Captors made POW's figuratively invisible
Title/Claim: Captives resisted efforts to dehumanize them.
Context:
Quote:
“Once, driven to his breaking point by a guard jabbing him, Louie yanked the stick from the guard’s hands" (182).
This shows: (how was it dehumanization in the first place?)
This proves captives resisted dehumanization because
Full transcript