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The Model Minority Myth

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Lisa Curry

on 8 October 2013

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Transcript of The Model Minority Myth

The Model Minority Myth By Lisa Curry Asian Americans,
a History Lesson Sub-populations, Internalization, and Future Research Sub-populations Internalization Lack of Scholarship Troubling Trends Discriminatory Legislation Changes in the 60's and 70's "Yellow Peril" Intro Video Five Misconceptions: Common Stereotypes: What is the model
minority myth? Asian Americans are extremely hardworking, more so than whites.
Asians are intelligent and highly educated
math and science geeks
economically successful, especially compared to other ethnic minorities
"assimilated" (live in suburbs, intermarry with whites)
"crowd" Universities as well as math and science fields 1.) Asian Americans are all the same.
2.) Asian Americans are not really racial and
ethnic minorities.
3.)Asian Americans do not encounter major
challenges because of their race.
4.)Asian Americans do not seek or require
resources and support.
5.)College Degree completion is equivalent
to success. Perceptions began to change, more positive portrayals
Asian Americans were promoted as the model minority to discredit protests for social justice of other minority groups. Asian Americans lack a voice in faculty and administration positions as well, due to the lower representation in leadership positions.
Asian American students report more negative opinions of social interactions and academic experiences, more social isolation, self-segregation, and exclusion than their non-Asian peers.
Stereotype pressures cause high levels of depression and anxiety Southeast Asian American populations hold degrees at lower rates than their East and South Asian counterparts.
Filipino Americans, Hmong, and Cambodians are severely underrepresented in the student populations, faculty positions in higher education, and achieve lower incomes and higher rates of poverty. Model Minority Myth Measure (IM-4)
Internalization of Asian American Stereotypes Scale (IAASS)
Internalization produces various negative effects lack of interest due to slow progress
researchers feel they need to justify research
lack of funding
lack of previous literature impedes scholars from conceptualizing research designs and providing context for inquiry Documentary link (Airing in May on PBS): http://www.entertainingdiversity.com/modelminority.html "Model Minority: Do The Math" (Lindgren & McGowan, 2006) (Kiang & Museus, 2009) 1800-1940's
Asian Americans were portrayed as deceitful, distrustful, depraved, and uncivilized.
Threatened to undermine the American way of life.
viewed as foreigners, not American citizens (Suzuki, 2002) The Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882
The Alien Land Law of 1913
Executive Order 9066, 1942 (Han, Pang, & Pang, 2011) (Suzuki, 2002) (Day, Kim, Suyemoto, Tanabe, & Tawa, 2009). (Burrola, Steger, & Yoo, 2010)
(Shen, Swanson, & Wang, 2011) Slow Progress College Cost Reduction and Access Act, established by Congress in 2007
The University of California system created and AAPI multi-campus research program to support faculty studying Asian American student populations Future Research and Proposals Researchers must collaborate, use existing resources, and use social networks to advance the study of Asian American populations
By instituting an Asian American Studies course requirement, we can empower Asian American students and scholars to bring attention to the unique needs of AAPI students, while educating non-Asian populations about Asian American stereotypes
Recruit and hire Asian American scholars, staff, and administration in order to promote research and to better understand the needs of students on their own campuses (Chang & Museus, 2009) (Chang & Museus, 2009) (Kiang & Museus, 2009) References Burrola, K.S., Steger, M.F., &Yoo, H.C. (2010). A preliminary report on a new measure: Internalization of the model minority myth measure (IM-4) and its psychological correlates among Asian American college students. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 57(1), 114-127.Chang, M. J., & Museus, S.D. (2009). Rising to the challenge of conducting research on Asian Americans in higher education. New Directions for Institutional Research,142, 95-105.Day, S.C., Kim, G.S., Suyemoto, K.L., Tanabe, M., & Tawa, J. (2009). Challenging the model minority myth: Engaging Asian American students in research on Asian American college student experiences. New Directions for Institutional Research, 142, 41-55. Esparrago, T., Johnston, M.P., Nadal, K.L., & Pituc, S.T. (2010). Overcoming the model minority myth: Experiences of Filipino American graduate students. Journal of College Student Development, 51(6), 694-706.Han, P.P., Pang, J.M., & Pang, V.O. (2011). Asian American and Pacific Islander students: Equity and the achievement gap. Educational Researcher, 40, 378-389. Kiang, P.N., & Museus, S.D. (2009). Deconstructing the model minority myth and how it contributes to the invisible minority in higher education research. New Directions for Institutional Research, 142, 5-15.Lindgren J., & McGowan, M.O. (2006). Testing the “model minority myth”. Northwestern University Law Review, 100(1), 331-377.Shen, F.C., Swanson, J.L., & Wang, Y.W. (2011). Development and initial validation of the internalization of Asian American stereotypes scale. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 17(3), 283-294.Suzuki, B.H. (2002). Revisiting the model minority stereotype: Implications for student affairs practice and higher education. New Directions for Student Services,97, 21-32.U.S. Census Bureau. (1994). 1990 census of population, general population characteristics, the United States (CP-1-1). Washington, DC: Government Printing Office. Burrola, K.S., Steger, M.F., &Yoo, H.C. (2010). A preliminary report on a new measure: Internalization of the model minority myth measure (IM-4) and its psychological correlates among Asian American college students. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 57(1), 114-127.Chang, M. J., & Museus, S.D. (2009). Rising to the challenge of conducting research on Asian Americans in higher education. New Directions for Institutional Research,142, 95-105.Day, S.C., Kim, G.S., Suyemoto, K.L., Tanabe, M., & Tawa, J. (2009). Challenging the model minority myth: Engaging Asian American students in research on Asian American college student experiences. New Directions for Institutional Research, 142, 41-55. Esparrago, T., Johnston, M.P., Nadal, K.L., & Pituc, S.T. (2010). Overcoming the model minority myth: Experiences of Filipino American graduate students. Journal of College Student Development, 51(6), 694-706.Han, P.P., Pang, J.M., & Pang, V.O. (2011). Asian American and Pacific Islander students: Equity and the achievement gap. Educational Researcher, 40, 378-389. Kiang, P.N., & Museus, S.D. (2009). Deconstructing the model minority myth and how it contributes to the invisible minority in higher education research. New Directions for Institutional Research, 142, 5-15.Lindgren J., & McGowan, M.O. (2006). Testing the “model minority myth”. Northwestern University Law Review, 100(1), 331-377.Shen, F.C., Swanson, J.L., & Wang, Y.W. (2011). Development and initial validation of the internalization of Asian American stereotypes scale. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 17(3), 283-294.Suzuki, B.H. (2002). Revisiting the model minority stereotype: Implications for student affairs practice and higher education. New Directions for Student Services,97, 21-32.U.S. Census Bureau. (1994). 1990 census of population, general population characteristics, the United States (CP-1-1). Washington, DC: Government Printing Office.
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