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Reading Music: The Basics

Music Tech Final
by

Elizabeth Roney

on 8 May 2014

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Transcript of Reading Music: The Basics

Rest Durations
Note Durations
Dynamics
Clefs
Key and Time Signatures
Note Durations
Treble and Bass Clef
Soft
Loud
Treble vs. Bass
Reading Music
The Basics
Whole Notes
Half Notes
Quarter Notes
Eighth Notes
Rest Durations
Whole and Half Rests
Bass Clef
The Grand Staff
Dynamics
1.
2.
3.
4.
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Key & Time Signatures
Quarter and Eighth Rests

Dynamics are defined as:
The varying levels of volume of sound in different parts of a musical performance.
There are 2 main types:

Whole notes have 4 beats.
Half notes have two beats each.
Two half notes = one whole note.
A quarter note has one beat.

One whole note = one measure.
One eighth note is a half of a beat.
Two eighth notes = one quarter note.
Four eighth notes = one half note.
Eight eighth notes = one whole note

Two quarter notes = one half note.
Four quarter notes = one whole note.
A way to remember...
a
h
alf rest is like a
h
at!
a
whole
rest is like a
hole
in the ground!
Whole rests hang off of the fourth line.
They are equal to 4 beats, or one whole note.
Half notes sit on the third line.
They are equal to two beats, or one half note.
A quarter rest is equal to one beat, just like a quarter note.
An eighth rest is equal to a half beat, just like an eighth note.
Let's Break It Down...
E G B D F
F A C E
"Every Good Boy Does Fine"
"Face"
Lines
Spaces
vs.
These are the same notes!
G B D F A
A C E G
"Good Boys Do Fine Always"
"All Cars Eat Gas"
Lines vs. Spaces
Time Signatures
*This is the most common
The top number is the number of beats per measure.
The bottom number is note that gets one beat.
In these three examples the quarter note is the beat.
Example: 3
4
= three quarter notes per measure.
Here are some examples of common time signatures found in music.
Major Key Signatures
Minor Key Signatures
Flats, Sharps, and Naturals
Treble Clef is higher than Bass Clef.
Instrument examples:

Flute
Clarinet
Saxophone
Trumpet
Tuba
Trombone
Bass
Cello
Treble:

Bass:
Pianists read the grand staff because they play in both clefs.
You will commonly see these as
accidentals.

Accidentals are momentary changes to the original key signature.
They look like this in music.
Lower the note a half step
Raise the note a half step.
Depending on the key signature, raise or lower the note back to its natural form. (C Major)
Key Signatures
C Major


F Major


G Major.
All natural notes.






One flat: Bb






One sharp: F#
* These are the basic key signatures you will begin with!*
Playing is an example of a song in a major key.

Major key signatures sound happy.

At this level you will typically play in a major key.
Playing is an example of the same piece we just heard, but in a minor key.

Notice the drastic difference to the song.

Minor key signatures sound sad and scary.
Let's hear an example of dynamics used in a basic C Major scale.
<iframe width="640" height="298" src="http://www.noteflight.com/embed/20b25914e5750ca0913abc16e06a64980019385e?scale=1&showAudio=true&role=template"></iframe>

Forte
, or loud, is shown with this symbol:

Piano
, or soft, is shown with this symbol:
As you can see there are a few others for the in-between stages of loud and soft. There are also louder and softer options.
Full transcript