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Argumentative Essay Terms/Parts

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on 24 October 2016

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Transcript of Argumentative Essay Terms/Parts

The Argumentative Essay
Components of an Argumentative Essay
Argumentative Outline
Part 1
: Claim
Part 2
: Reasoning #1 (2 pieces of evidence)
Part 3
: Reasoning #2 (2 pieces of evidence)
Part 4
: Counterclaim/Rebuttal (1-2 pieces of evidence)
Part 5
: Conclusion
You should always take one side of an argument. Do not waiver between the claim and counterclaim.
1st reason = strongest reason
Facts over Personal Experience
Counterclaim should address the strongest argument the opposition can give.
Use 3rd person, not 1st person (No "I" or "me").
Conclusion
An argumentative essay can be written in many ways. However, the most important thing you understand is that a valid argument gives reasons and evidence for your claim, and also addresses the other side of the argument as well.
Claim
: The main argument of an essay.

Reasoning
: Reasons that support your claim

Evidence
: statistics or information that support your reasoning and back your claim.

Counterclaim
: Other side of the argument. Statement that disagrees with your claim

Rebuttal
: Reasoning and Evidence that negates the counterclaim, or makes it irrelevant.
Some friendly tips!
Claim: The main argument of an essay.


ex. Students should be allowed to bring
bottled water into class.
Reasoning: Reasons that support your claim

ex. Students will be able to stay hydrated
during school which will help them focus &
learn.
Evidence: statistics or information that support your reasoning and back your claim.

ex. According to a study by Psychology Today, "Years of research have found that when we're parched, we have more difficulty keeping our attention focused. Dehydration can impair short-term memory function and the recall of long-term memory. The ability to perform mental arithmetic, like calculating whether or not you'll be late for work if you hit snooze for another 15 minutes, is compromised when your fluids are low."
Counterclaim: Other side of the argument. Statement that disagrees with your claim

Ex. Students may put banned substances in their water bottles
Rebuttal: Reasoning, evidence, or solution that negates the counterclaim, or makes it irrelevant.

Ex. While this is a legitimate concern, there is a simple solution: The cafeteria could sell water bottles and only sealed water bottles bought from the cafeteria could be allowed in the classroom.
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