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Poetry Prezi On Jimmy Santiago Baca.

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by

Anjali Desai

on 6 November 2012

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Transcript of Poetry Prezi On Jimmy Santiago Baca.

My Second Observations When I read this for the second time I was more focused on the middle part of the poem and I noticed that he also tells them that they should be strong, and have hope. My First Observations Things I saw the first time I read it; Oppression
By Jimmy Santiago Baca Is a question of strength,
of unshed tears,
of being trampled under,
and always, always,
remembering you are human.

Look deep to find the grains of hope and strength,
and sing, my brothers and sisters,

and sing. The sun will share
your birthdays with you behind bars,
the new spring grass

like fiery spears will count your years,
as you start into the next year;
endure my brothers, endure my sisters. My Third Observations As I focused on the last stanzas I noticed he wants them to revolt and not worry about being arrested. He tells them that is it okay to sacrifice their lives. My Relation to A Tale of Two Cities The poem Oppression reminds me of the peasants in A Tale of Two Cities because in the first stanza it states that all human beings should be treated with respect but unfortunately the peasants were not treated with respect by the nobles. They had to pay high taxes, were starving, and most importantly they were not treated like humans. The end of this poem shows how the peasants were also determined to rebel against the nobles just like the poet was trying intrigue the audience in his poem. The peasants were not afraid of sacrificing their lives to prove their point was right. My Connection with Whitman The Poem by Walt Whitman that related the most was called "I sit and Look Out" Presentation By: Anjali Desai Oppression By Jimmy Santiago Baca This first time I read this poem I focused on mainly the first stanza. Words that really stuck out to me were: I SIT and look out upon all the sorrows of the world, and upon all
oppression and shame;
I hear secret convulsive sobs from young men, at anguish with
themselves, remorseful after deeds done;
I see, in low life, the mother misused by her children, dying,
neglected, gaunt, desperate;
I see the wife misused by her husband—I see the treacherous seducer
of young women;
I mark the ranklings of jealousy and unrequited love, attempted to be
hid—I see these sights on the earth;
I see the workings of battle, pestilence, tyranny—I see martyrs and
prisoners;
I observe a famine at sea—I observe the sailors casting lots who
shall be kill'd, to preserve the lives of the rest;
I observe the slights and degradations cast by arrogant persons upon
laborers, the poor, and upon negroes, and the like;
All these—All the meanness and agony without end, I sitting, look
out upon,
See, hear, and am silent. Some words that stuck out to me the second time I read this poem were: Is a question of strength,
of unshed tears,
of being trampled under,
and always, always,
remembering you are human. I saw that at first stanza talks about how those who are oppressed in their pain makes them stronger. The poet also stresses that they should remember they are human beings and therefore should be treated with respect. Look deep to find the grains of hope and strength,
and sing, my brothers and sisters,

and sing. The sun will share
your birthdays with you behind bars, The sun will share
your birthdays with you behind bars,
the new spring grass

like fiery spears will count your years,
as you start into the next year;
endure my brothers, endure my sisters.
Full transcript