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5 Types of Triangles & Parts of Triangles

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Maryann Lyons

on 16 May 2014

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Transcript of 5 Types of Triangles & Parts of Triangles

5 Types of Triangles & Parts of Triangles
Acute Triangle & Obtuse Triangle
A acute triangle is where all angles measure less than a right angle or 90 degrees.




An obtuse triangle is a triangle that has an angle more than 90 degrees.

Isosceles Triangle & Equilateral Triangle
Right Triangle & Scalene Triangles
Median of a Triangle
Median of a Triangle is a line segment joining a vertex of the triangle to the midpoint of the opposite side of the triangle. The three medians of a triangle are concurrent and the concurrent point is called the centroid of the triangle.
("Median of a Triangle," n.d.)
A isosceles triangle is any triangle that has two sides that are the same length.



A equilateral triangle is a triangle where all three sides are the same length.
Altitude of a Triangle
Formally, the shortest line segment between a vertex of a triangle and the (possibly extended) opposite side. Altitude also refers to the length of this segment.
Bisector of a Triangle
Activity
Exit Ticket
References
The definition of the perpendicular bisector of a side of a triangle is a line segment that is both perpendicular to a side of a triangle and passes through its midpoint.
Identify the median of the triangle.
Choices:
A. AD
B. AC
C. CB
D. BD

Draw an example of altitude, median, and bisector of a triangle.
(Gibilisco, 2003)
(Copyright Math Open Reference, n.d.)
("The Altitudes of a Triangle," 2011)
("Constructing the Angle Bisectors of a Triangle," 2011)
("Types of Triangles," n.d.)
By: Maryann Lyons
The Altitudes of a Triangle. (2011, May 02). Retrieved May 12, 2014, from
Bruce Simmons. (n.d.). Mathwords: Altitude. Retrieved May 09, 2014, from http://www.mathwords.com/a/altitude.htm
Constructing the Angle Bisectors of a Triangle. (2011, May 02). Retrieved May 5, 2014, from
Copyright Math Open Reference. (n.d.). Isosceles triangle - math word definition - Math Open Reference. Retrieved May 08, 2014, from http://www.mathopenref.com/isosceles.html
Finding The Altitude Of A Triangle. (n.d.). Retrieved May 08, 2014, from http://needmathhelp.jimdo.com/geometry/finding-the-altitude-of-a-triangle
Gibilisco, S. (2003). Geometry demystified. New York: McGraw-Hill.
MathsIsFun.com. (n.d.). Obtuse Triangle. Retrieved May 07, 2014, from http://www.mathsisfun.com/definitions/obtuse-triangle.html
Median of a Triangle - MathHelp.com - Geometry Help. (2007, October 31). Retrieved May 5, 2014, from
Median of a Triangle. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=median+of+triangles
Median of a triangle. (n.d.). Retrieved May 09, 2014, from http://www.icoachmath.com/math_dictionary/median_of_a_triangle.html
The Perpendicular Bisectors of a Triangle. (n.d.). Retrieved May 09, 2014, from http://www.geom.uiuc.edu/~demo5337/Group2/perpbisect.html
Triangle Angle Bisector Theorem - MathHelp.com - Math Help. (2008, May 13). Retrieved May 12, 2014, from
Types of Triangles. (n.d.). Retrieved May 08, 2014, from http://www.mathwarehouse.com/geometry/triangles/triangle-types.php
Trigonometry-is a branch of mathematics that studies relationships involving lengths and angles of triangles.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trigonometry
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