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ADHD

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Michaela Owen

on 29 July 2014

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Transcript of ADHD

Chris Cruz, David Nguyen, Laura Owen, & Michaela Owen
ADHD
Classroom Scenario
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/misunderstoodminds/experiences/attexp3a.html
Demographics
The number of children diagnosed with ADHD has steadily increased

Approximately 11% of children 4-17 years of age (6.4 million) have been diagnosed with ADHD as of 2011.

Boys (13.2%) were more likely than girls (5.6%) to have ever been diagnosed with ADHD.

Studies show that white children are diagnosed with more frequency, but other races are just as likely to show symptoms
Challenges
Students with ADHD have difficulty staying focused on classroom tasks

Students with ADD are more prone to internalize negative feedback from teachers, family, and peers

Students with ADHD will often be very quiet and disengaged or acting out

Identifying Symptoms
ADHD can be difficult to identify because symptoms vary

External factors can cause similiar symptoms - get to know the child

It's important to consider behavior in different situations

Consistency and severity of symptoms
Characteristics
The 3 main signs of ADHD are
inattention
,
hyperactivity
, and
impulsivity
.
ADHD
Definition
: neurological development disorder that affects the behavior, attention, and learning.

One of the most common childhood disorders that can continue through adolescence and adulthood

Listed as Other Health Impaired
Nick's Story
I tell my parents I study a lot. I tell them I'm all caught up with my work. Neither is true. I may spend a lot of time in front of my books, but I'm attracted to everything else around me. I'm emailing, sending text messages to my girlfriend Mariah, and cruising the internet. I’m pulled in by just about anything interesting, fast, flashy, and loud—and all I have to do is hit the enter key to find more. Having to read a chapter in my history book or write an essay about my take on a poem written by some ancient guy who’s impossible to understand can’t compete with all the other stuff that gives me instant satisfaction. I don't feel good about lying to my folks. I'm really a good kid, but I know they have high hopes for me, and I don't want to look stupid in their eyes. Lying is my camouflage. It's my way of trying to make my AD/HD go away.
I tell my parents I study a lot. I tell them I'm all caught up with my work. Neither is true. I may spend a lot of time in front of my books, but I'm attracted to everything else around me. I'm emailing, sending text messages to my girlfriend Mariah, and cruising the internet. I’m pulled in by just about anything interesting, fast, flashy, and loud—and all I have to do is hit the enter key to find more. Having to read a chapter in my history book or write an essay about my take on a poem written by some ancient guy who’s impossible to understand can’t compete with all the other stuff that gives me instant satisfaction. I don't feel good about lying to my folks. I'm really a good kid, but I know they have high hopes for me, and I don't want to look stupid in their eyes. Lying is my camouflage. It's my way of trying to make my AD/HD go away.
I tell my parents I study a lot. I tell them I'm all caught up with my work. Neither is true. I may spend a lot of time in front of my books, but I'm attracted to everything else around me. I'm emailing, sending text messages to my girlfriend Mariah, and cruising the internet. I’m pulled in by just about anything interesting, fast, flashy, and loud—and all I have to do is hit the enter key to find more. Having to read a chapter in my history book or write an essay about my take on a poem written by some ancient guy who’s impossible to understand can’t compete with all the other stuff that gives me instant satisfaction. I don't feel good about lying to my folks. I'm really a good kid, but I know they have high hopes for me, and I don't want to look stupid in their eyes. Lying is my camouflage. It's my way of trying to make my AD/HD go away.
Strategies and Accomodations for ADHD
Seating
Seat the student with ADHD away from windows and doors with the focus on the teacher.

Information delivery
Give instructions one at a time and repeat as necessary.
Use visuals and outlines for note-taking that organize the information as you deliver it

Seat work
Create worksheets and tests with fewer items; give frequent short quizzes rather than long tests.
Divide long-term projects into segments and assign a completion goal for each segment.

Organization
Allow time for students to organize materials and use a system for writing down assignments and important dates


Strategies and Accomodations for ADD
Starting lesson plan
Tell students what they’re going to learn, what your expectations are, and what materials they'll need.

Conducting lesson plan
Keep instructions simple and structured.
Vary the pace and include multimodal activities
Allow a student with ADHD frequent breaks.
Try not to ask a student with ADHD perform a task or answer a question publicly that might be too difficult.

Ending the lesson
Summarize and repeat key points.
Outline any work students need to complete at home.

Causes
According to National Institute of Health, scientists are unsure what specifically causes ADHD

Like many other illnesses, ADHD probably results from a combination of factors.

Many factors that might contribute to ADHD:
Genes
Environmental factors
Brain injuries
Nutrition

Genes
Several studies show that ADHD runs in families

Learning about genes could help prevent the disorder
External Environment
Possible link between the following conditions and higher risk of developing ADHD

Cigarette smoke and alcohol use during pregnancy

Students exposed to high levels of lead
Brain Injuries
Students who suffered a brain injury may show some behaviors similar to ADHD

Small percent of children with ADHD suffer from traumatic brain injury
Diet
Most research discounts theory that refined sugar causes ADHD

New research is being conducted to determine artificial food additives lead to ADHD
I tell my parents I study a lot. I tell them I'm all caught up with my work. Neither is true. I may spend a lot of time in front of my books, but I'm attracted to everything else around me. I'm emailing, sending text messages to my girlfriend Mariah, and cruising the internet. I’m pulled in by just about anything interesting, fast, flashy, and loud—and all I have to do is hit the enter key to find more. Having to read a chapter in my history book or write an essay about my take on a poem written by some ancient guy who’s impossible to understand can’t compete with all the other stuff that gives me instant satisfaction. I don't feel good about lying to my folks. I'm really a good kid, but I know they have high hopes for me, and I don't want to look stupid in their eyes. Lying is my camouflage. It's my way of trying to make my AD/HD go away.
Checking for Comprehension
Who is Nick texting?
a) Megan
b) Kayla
c) Mariah
d) Juliet

Who does Nick not feel good about lying to?
a) His girlfriend
b) His teacher
c) His friends
d) His parents

List 3 things Nick does when he should be studying.
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Categories
Impulsivity
Very impatient

Act with little regard for the consequences

Speak without thinking

Interupts conversations

Hyperactive behavior
Inattention
Easily distracted

Difficulty focusing on one task

Daydreaming

Easily confused

Easily bored with tasks
Hyperactivity
Trouble sitting still

Trouble staying quiet

Constantly in motion

Need to interact with objects

Often social problems
Myth: ADHD and ADD are the same thing
ADD is a subcategory of ADHD

The 3 main categories:
Hyperactive
Inattentive (ADD)
Combination
Diagnosis
No single test can diagnose the disorder

Teachers cannot diagnose ADHD

Qualified medical personnel can diagnose ADHD

But teacher's insight can be valuable

Vanderbilt ADHD Diagnosis Teacher Rating Scale
http://dcf.psychiatry.ufl.edu/files/2011/05/VanderbuiltEvaluation-Parent-and-Teacher.pdf
Misdiagnosis
ADHD can be mistaken for other problems

Parents and teachers may misidentify children who are inattentive and well-behaved

Adults may think that children with the hyperactive and impulsive symptoms just have disciplinary problems
Ben
What are some characteristics?




What classroom accommodations could you use for Ben?

John
Characteristics:
Focusing on inappropriate activity
Trouble concentrating on one task
Misses details

Classroom Accommodations:
Use simple instructions
Structured instructions
that are engaging
Provide frequent breaks
Summarize key points
Tell us what you think on your handout
Insatiable
Trouble sitting still
Impulsive behavior



Seat student closer to teacher
Use visuals
Multimodal activities
Summary
ADHD varies from case to case.

The 3 categories of ADHD are inattentive, hyperactivity, and combination.

There is not one single proven cause of ADHD.

Students with ADHD generally have difficulty focusing their attention on an appropriate task, but are more likely to focus on interesting structured instruction

Teachers should limit distractions for students with ADHD and provide clear, multimodal instruction.

Students with ADHD often have great empathy,
social skills, and talents in certain areas.

Resources
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/misunderstoodminds/attention.html

http://www.adhdaware.org/understanding-adhd/toolbox-for-educators-2

http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/index.shtml

http://ldaamerica.org/resources/ld-adhd-information-resources/

http://ncld.org/types-learning-disabilities/adhd-related-issues/adhd
http://www.additudemag.com/topic/adhd-learning-disabilities/adhd-teachers.html

http://www.helpguide.org/mental/teaching_tips_add_adhd.htm

http://dcf.psychiatry.ufl.edu/files/2011/05/VanderbuiltEvaluation-
Parent-and-Teacher.pdf

http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/adhd/data.html
Want to find more information?
Objective
Objective 1:
After viewing a presentation on ADHD, students will be able to list the three major categories of students with ADHD and identify at least three instructional strategies or accomodations teachers can use for students with ADHD.

We will hand out playing cards to split students into groups.

Find your group members, by searching for the people who have the same value or face on their card as you
Full transcript