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Revolutionary War and The Declaration of Independence

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Emily Warren

on 28 October 2014

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Transcript of Revolutionary War and The Declaration of Independence

Woman and the Revolution
Woman had many roles. They could've been cooks, nurses, or maids but also could've been spies and secret soldiers. We will focus manly on nurses and women soldiers
Nurses
It wasn't until 1777 that nurses became popular in the war. Many nurses were related to soldiers. They originally followed the troops looking for food and a home because they couldn't support themselves on their own. The nurses were paid 0.24 cents and a full ration of food and the supervisors,or matrons, where paid 0.50 cents and a full ration. Even though the pay was good most women didn't take the job because the death rate for the nurses was extremely high because of sickness.
Soldiers
Causes of the Revolutionary War
-The Boston Tea Party

- Intolerable Acts

- Battles of Lexington and Concord

- General hate for the British
British Reactions to the Declaration
The British were insulted by the Declaration, but respected the opinions of the colonists, as they still wanted the image of the British to stay positive to their side.
About the Declaration of Independence
There is no other document that has globally innovated mankind like the Declaration of Independence. The document pointed out why the 13 colonies wanted to part from harsh British government. It was signed by 56 congressional representatives of the 13 colonies.
The Effect The Declaration of Independence, Woman, and African Americans had on the Revolutionary War
Effects the Declaration of Independence Had on the War
Contributions from Women and African American
Women had may roles during the war and many African Americans fought along side the patriots here we will be exploring more of what each of them did.
Women served as secret soldiers because they weren't allowed to join the military. Cutting hair, using bandages to bind their breasts, and changing their names where all things women did to disguise themselves. Most woman where unmarried, poor, and/or young so they joined to get money for their family. Deborah Sampson aka. Robert Shurtliff is a famous female soldier who fought for over a year until it was found that she was a woman. Another famous female soldier was Ann (or Nancy) Bailey aka. Sam Gay her real identity wasn't found until a few weeks after being promoted to Corporal. She renlisted after she was let out of jail and was discovered about three weeks later and put back in jail.
Sources
http://historyofmassachusetts.org/the-roles-of-women-in-the-revolutionary-war/

http://www.history.org/history/teaching/enewsletter/volume5/images/reference_sheet.pdf

http://www.revolutionary-war.net/

http://www.gilderlehrman.org/history-by-era/road-revolution/essays/declaration-independence-global-perspective

http://www.concurringopinions.com/archives/2012/10/the-british-response-to-the-declaration-of-independence.html
James was a spy for the Continental army commander General Lafayette. He became a servant to British general Lord Cornwallis, and was asked to spy on the colonists. He made sure to give Cornwallis information that wouldn't help him, and made sure Lafayette was informed about the British troops. He was enslaved after the war but was set free in 1786 after sending a letter asking to be free.
James Armistead
Saul Matthews
He was enslaved and enlisted as a soldier under Colonel Josiah Parker. Parker sent Saul into British
camps several times on spying missions. Saul faced great danger but always returned
with important information about British troop positions and movements. Saul was always praised by his leaders.Still, he was returned as a slave but was released in 1792.
How African Americans Effected the Revolutionary War
Now we will focus on African Americans and how they helped during the revolution. There where many African Americans that helped in the revolution. There where African American minuet men that began fighting in 1775 during the battles of Lexington and Concord. There were about 200 African American men in the Rhode Island Regiment. The Royal Ethiopian Regiment was made up of only African Americans that agreed with Lord Dunmore’s Proclamation the Royal Ethiopian Regiment was made up of 800 musket carrying men that wore shirts with “Liberty to Slaves” written on them. We will focus on two spies that worked for the coloniststheir names are James Armistead and Saul Matthews

Colonist Contributions to the Declaration

At the time, the Declaration was being drafted. The war was started because of the intensity of British control. The Declaration of Independence stated why the colonies were leaving British control.
THANKS FOR WATCHING
Besides the fact that the colonists wrote the Declaration, there are some key points that the colonists contributed.
"All men are created equal"
"Resolved, That these United Colonies are, and of right ought to be, free and independent States..."
"Let us prepare for the worst. We can die here but once."
The Declaration and Today's World
The Revolutionary War and Today's World
The Declaration symbolized freedom and equality, and as well as being who you want without anyone telling you otherwise.
As human beings, we quarrel about almost every little thing. But we won't let that get in the way of what we want from life. The colonies wanted independence, and the British wanted to conquer land. And they would stop at nothing to get what they wanted.
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