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Monocular vs Binocular Vision

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Kofi Mensah

on 11 March 2014

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Transcript of Monocular vs Binocular Vision

Monocular vs Binocular Vision
What are monocular and binocular vision??
Monocular and binocular vision both serve an unique purpose.
The difference between the two is the ability to judge distances, known as
depth perception
In binocular vision, two eyes work together to focus on a single point, so the brain can determine depth and distance.
Monocular vision exists in animals with eyes on opposite sides of the head, which prevents the two eyes from having a common focal point
Monocular vision also exists in animals that had binocular vision but lost vision in one eye.
Animals - Binocular
Most carnivorous (meat-eating) mammals and all birds of prey have binocular vision, in which two eyes face forward.
Binocular vision allows predators to hone in on prey using both eyes. They can then quickly and accurately judge striking distance.
This ability is sometimes known as binocular acuity and is common to nearly all predators including humans
A few predators that do not rely on binocular vision are bats, dolphins and some whales, all of which use echo location to spot prey. Snakes use tongue flicking.
Animals - Monocular
Prey animals like deer, who have eyes on opposite sides of the head, need a wide range of vision to inform them when a predator is near
Most prey animals have monocular vision. This type of vision does not prevent the animal from seeing an object in the distance, but it does prevent them from being able to tell exactly how far away the object is.
Prey animals do not need the ability to precisely assess a predator’s location, but are better equipped to survive by having the increased field of view that monocular vision offers them
In fact, animals with monocular vision can see two completely different scenes out of each eye simultaneously, allowing for an increased chance of spotting a predator.
Animals - Monocular
Acquired monocular vision occurs when an animal with binocular vision loses vision in one eye. Humans who have lost one eye are aware of the difficulties of living without the ability to determine depth perception
Driving a car or even stepping off the porch can be treacherous for people who have acquired monocular vision. Monocular and binocular vision both depend on the brain's ability to process the images coming in.
Luckily, the brain is highly adaptable and able to compensate in cases of acquired monocular vision. Ultimately, it is the brain that drives all forms of vision.
Quiz
Firstly, you look at the eyes of the animal, then you guess the animal
Then, you say whether it uses monocular or binocular vision, and then whether the animal is generally a predator or prey
Ready???
Number 1
Lizard
Monocular
Prey
Number 2
Ape
Binocular
Predator
Number 3
Horse
Monocular
Prey
Number 4
Dog
Predator
Binocular
Number 5
Badger
Binocular
Predator
Number 6
Bat
Monocular
Predator
Number 7
Human
Binocular
Predator
Number 8
Rabbit
Monocular
Prey
Number 9
Cat
Binocular
Predator
Number 10
Bird
Monocular
Prey
Number 11
Fish
Monocular
Prey
Number 12
Snake
Monocular
Predator
In summary,
most
animals with monocular vision are prey and are caught by other animals.
Most
animals with binocular vision are predators and catch their prey to eat
Full transcript