Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

What the fizz?

This prezi is designed to guide students through a chemical stoihciometry lab. The purpose of the lab is for students to use preliminary data from 2 different trials to determine which reactants to use, then use stoichiometry to make the best drink.
by

Valerie Henderson

on 11 March 2016

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of What the fizz?

What the fizz?
A fizzy history
Joseph Priestly in 1767
First man-made non-alcoholic carbonated drink
Used:
chalk (calcium carbonate) and sulfuric acid
produced carbon dioxide
the carbon dioxide produced bubbles
Carbonated drinks had been produced prior
sugar + yeast carbon dioxide + alcohol
fermentation
Purpose
Citric Acid
H C H O

highly soluble
acid
used in drinks to enhance flavor
adds a sour fruity taste
Background Lab Trials aka The Kool Aid Trials
Trial 1:
Plain Kool Aid
1. Pour Kool Aid into a small cup until it is about 1/4 full
2. Observe general characteristics and taste
3. Record observations
Students will decide which two reactants they should use and complete stoichiometric calculations to determine the amount of each reactant to produce the best tasting fizzy drink.
3
6
5
7
Baking Soda
NaHCO

aka sodium hydrogen carbonate
white powder
base
used in cleaning, deodorizing, buffering, fire extinguishing
3
Trial 2
: Kool Aid and Citric Acid
1. Pour Kool Aid into a small cup until it is about 1/4 full
2. Add 0.5 g citric acid to the Kool Aid
3. Observe general characteristics and taste
4. Record observations
Trial 3:
Kool Aid and Baking Soda
1. Pour Kool Aid into a small cup until it is about 1/4 full
2. Add 0.5 g baking soda to the Kool Aid
3. Observe general characteristics and taste
4. Record observations
Class Discussion of Observations from Background Lab Trials
What did you observe in trial 1?
Taste:
What did you observe in trial 2?
What did you observe in trial 3?
Fizz:
What did you observe in trial 1?
What did you observe in trial 2?
What did you observe in trial 3?
Your turn!
Design a lab experiment to create the best tasting fizzy Kool Aid drink.
How could you make the best tasting fizzy Kool Aid drink?
Hint: What have we previously combined?
plain Kool Aid = control group
Kool Aid + citric acid = sour taste
Kool Aid + baking soda = salty bitter taste
You will be given 0.3 grams of citric acid.
You must calculate the amount of baking soda you will need to make the best fizz.
Writing a testable question:
Related to the lab purpose
Gives an idea of what you will use and what data you will collect.
A claim:
Answers a testable question
Based on a scientific law/theory
Background Research:
Necessary to answer testable question
States how this is relevant to your life
Procedure:
You must develop your own procedure.
Things to consider:
1. You will start with 1 small cupfull of Kool Aid.
2. Make your calculations based off of 0.3 grams of citric acid.
3. You will need to start by creating a balanced equation so you can calculate how much baking soda to use.
4. Pour the Kool Aid into a larger cup so you don't bubble over.
Extra Help:
Reaction occurs best if both reactants are in solution and then mixed together.
What to combine:
citric acid and baking soda
The reaction of citric acid with baking soda produces sodium citrate, water, and carbon dioxide.
Where do the bubbles come from?
CO
2
How to write and balance the chemical equation.
How to complete the stoichiometry required.
How to write the balanced chemical equation.
Step 2: write the chemical formulas from names to make the skeleton equation
The reaction of citric acid with baking soda produces sodium citrate, water and carbon dioxide.
Step 1: identify the reactants & products
citric acid
+
baking soda
sodium citrate
water
+
+
carbon dioxide
H C H O
3
6
5
7
+
NaHCO
3
Na C H O
3
6
5
7
+
H O
2
+
CO
2
Step 3: balance the skeleton equation
H C H O
NaHCO
Na C H O
H O
CO
3 6 5 7
3
3 6 5 7
2
2
+
__
+
___
+
___
___
___
H:
C:
O:
Na:
H:
C:
O:
Na:
8
+
1
=
9
6
+
1
=
7
7
+
3
=
10
1
5
+
2
=
7
6
+
1
=
7
7
+
1
+
2
=
10
3
3
x3
=
3
x3
3
11
x3
3
9
x3
9
16
3
x3
3
9
x3
6
14
3
x3
6
11
x3
3
16
Data Collection
What is data analysis?
math performed on the data
percent error
What kind of data do you need in order to perform data analysis?
qualitative
quantitative
numbers
desriptions
What kind of data could you take that is quantitative?
remember the reaction between baking soda and citric acid is an acid + base reaction...
double replacement
Take the pH!
What will you compare the pH of your soda in order to determine what pH your soda should be?
What about the pH of other sodas?
Could you determine a pH range that is acceptable to consider your soda, good soda?
Full transcript