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Copy of ARTS AND CRAFTS OF THAILAND

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marzeus katigbak

on 9 July 2014

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Transcript of Copy of ARTS AND CRAFTS OF THAILAND

THAI ARTS AND CRAFTS
ARTS AND CRAFTS OF THAILAND
CRAFTS AS STATUS SYMBOLS
Before, it was the custom for craftsmen and artists to live in the houses of wealthy families, producing excellent crafts and sharing their skills. They were known as “chang” roughly meaning “craft” or “craftsmen” and were attached directly to the court.
- The resin from a rak or hak tree is applied in layers to wood, allowing each layer to dry and polishing it with rough leaves or sandpaper – a process that can take weeks or even months
LACQUERWARE
MOTHER-OF-PEARL INLAY
- Can be traced as far back as the 6th century
- the shell used is called muk fai – meaning ‘mother-of-pearl with flame’, which can only be found at the Gulf of Thailand
- used extensively to adorn royal food containers, furniture, Buddhist objects of worship

GOLDWORK
- artisans produced jewelry, cosmetic jars, betel-nut containers, etc. for royalty
- gold creations were more than personal ornamentations, they symbolized the rank and authority, sometimes believed to give supernatural powers

NIELLOWARE
- is done through inlaying the niello to fill a carved pattern on the silver, then baked in an open fire to let the alloy harden. It would be then smoothened and buffed
- used to decorate royal thrones, manuscript covers, and a wide variety of trays, boxes, bowls, urns, vases, and teapots

SILVERWARE
- Chiang Mai – the traditional center of Thai silverware in the North
- Repousse – characteristic of the northern silver, a technique in which a malleable metal is hammered from the reverse side to create ornaments in low relief
BENCHARONG
- multi-colour enamelled terracotta ware with floral decorations, or figures of Buddha and lotus leaves, originally made in China for export in Thailand
- Lai Nam Thong - overglazed enamel ware to which gold has been applied

CEREMONIAL CRAFTS
Ceremony is a big part of Thai culture. A variety of forms are created for different purposes, such as religious rites, royal occasions and the high-spirited sanuk or fun of village festivals.
thammat

- or pulpit, on which monks sit when delivering sermons or chanting

thammat thaen or tieng - simplest pulpit consisting of a rectangular seat without a back panel
thammat yot - largest form of Buddhist pulpit, consisting of an elevated seat for one or more monks, sheltered by a multi-tiered spired roof
Single steps are often carved like these in the form of kneeling animals.
talum - ceremonial trays used for the presentation of offerings to Chakri kings
traditional Thai garlands known as malai
VILLAGE CRAFTS
Many Thai household crafts evolved from the requirements of the kitchen. Bamboo is the commonest craft material, as they grow plentiful throughout the country.
khood maprow – device for grating coconut; made of wood with iron grater; a common form is the kratai khood maprow in the shape of a rabbit
storage containers made of woven lacquered bamboo from northern Thailand
an all-in-one traditional stove known as cherng khan made of baked clay
glutinous rice containers known as kong khao used both for steaming rice and keeping it until meal time
decorative wooden clappers from the northeast tied around the necks of water buffaloes so that they can be easily located when they stray from the fields
TEXTILES
Thais most likely brought weaving skills with them on their migrations down from southern China. Thai textiles were mostly woven to fulfill the basic needs of clothing and merit-making offerings to monasteries.
Romanticized French view of Thai upper-class dress; from an account of his journey to Ayutthaya in 1687 by Simon de La Loubere
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