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Segregation "Africville"

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by

Herpo Derpo

on 20 October 2014

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Transcript of Segregation "Africville"

Lorenzo - In the poem "Africville," Maxine Tynes use of the speakers thoughts and feelings emphasize that a community is segregated when invdividulas are hostile between one another; ultimately leading to an isolated society

"We are all dispossessed Black of the land/creeping with pain away from our home" (Tynes 2,8)

"I talk Africville... untill it is both you and me/till it stands and lives again" (Tynes 13,20-21)

"We mourn for the burial of our houses, our church our roads;/but we wear our Africville face and skin and hair" (Tynes 32-33)
"We are Africville/ we are the dispossessed Black of the land" (Tynes 1-2)

"We mourn for the burial of our houses, our church, our roads" (Tynes 32)

"Africville...Africville...Africville" (Tyne)
Image by Tom Mooring
Segregation of "Africville"

Noel - In the poem "Africville", Maxine Tynes' use of figurative language emphasizes that when a community's structure is segregated, individuals tend to be hostile towards one another, which ultimately leads to an isolated society.
Owen - In the poem "Africville", Maxine Tynes' use of structure and sound devices emphasizes that when a community's structure is segregated, individuals are hostile towards one another, which ultimately leads to an isolated society.
The stanza breaks throughout the poem indicate that the narrator changes the subject from stanza to stanza (Tynes)

"Black, so black with community./ I talk Africville/ to you/ and to you/" (Tynes 16-19)

"but we wear Our Africville face and skin and hair./ For the world./ For Africville" (Tynes 33-35)
By: Lorenzo Pestana, Noel Erpelo and Owen Thouless
Connection: Text to Media
Connection: Text to Media
Connection: Text to Media
Full transcript