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World War 1 Spies- Espionage

8C- 1
by

Dalia Weinstein

on 2 April 2013

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Transcript of World War 1 Spies- Espionage

by, Dalia Weinstein World War 1 Spies-
Espionage Spies could get information about
their enemies secretly and could
pass information secretly Why were spies so
important in WW1? 1. A famous spy Mata Hari Most famous: What were some gadgets
used by spies? Homing Pigeons- Used to carry messages Sabotage by Enemy agents Horses were infected with anthrax
Started fires
Blew up military installations, Invisible Ink + Mix lemon juice with potassium and write on paper with the solution. To read what the invisible note says, hold the paper to a light source and the message will appear Even human bodies were used for recording secret messages To get the messages off, rub in citrus Ways messages
were hidden *in tins
*in packets of chocolate
*in bars of soap
*sewn into clothes Mata Hari- most famous spy (AND female) of WW1 At start of war, spied for Germany
By 1916, was double agent for Germany and France
Had relationships with many high-ranking men in influential positions
Her relationships and connections took her across international borders- helping with her spying
Arrested by Germans on February 13th, 1917 in Paris
Tried by military court and sentenced to death for spying
Shot on October 15th, 1917 when she was 41
3. MI5- What is/was it? How did it contribute to WW1? The MI5 was the spy organization of Britain. It's purpose: protect Britain's national security VERY successful

•The spies were well-trained
•Not about how many other spies they caught, but how many secrets they uncovered Its founder:
Vernon Kell Kell Several female recruits held high positions in the MI5- start of more women's rights and jobs 4. Making Codes 5. Breaking Codes Helped keep messages secret
so enemies would not
discover secret plans Codes were used to write the Zimmermann Telegram

Germans sent it to Mexico and was intercepted by the British who broke its code The SMS Magdeburg German ship
Hit sand bank and Russian torpedo boat took over
Discovered naval codebook
Russians so inexperienced could not break code
Another codebook was captured on the Hobart which had keys for a superencipherment system
Helped Russians read the German naval messages ***Superencipherment- to encode a message that is already a cryptogram (a text written in code) To make a code, letters, numbers, or symbols replace different words/letters of a signal or message For example:
Morse Code . -.. - - . . - - - - - -. -
^
Can you guess what this says? Breaking codes can be really hard

One man took 16 years figuring out a code to decipher a message Cryptanalysts are people who break codes

"E" is used most often in English- so whichever symbol appears the most is probably the letter "E"
Look for two letter words ending in "E"- there are only four in English
Look for symbols on their own- only two in English- "I" and "A" Machines used to decipher codes Bombe Types of ciphers Simple Cipher Cipher Disk The two inside rings are rotated to align with numbers and letters in two outside rings.

This makes a simple substitution cipher in which one letter stands for another (This type of cipher is easy to break)

ex.) "W" stands for "E" Hey, I'm James Bond

"Britannica School." Britannica School. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Mar. 2013.
British Army Pigeon. Photographer. Encyclopædia Britannica Image Quest. Web. 21 Mar 2013. Http://quest.eb.com/images/115_2742541
Circa 1914: The L2. Photographer. Encyclopædia Britannica Image Quest. Web. 21 Mar 2013. Http://quest.eb.com/images/115_2817358
"Cryptology : Developments during World Wars I and II." Encyclopedia Britannica Online. Encyclopedia Britannica, n.d. Web. 20 Mar. 2013.
"THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE SECRET SERVICE BUREAU." N.p., n.d. Web. <http://webpath.follettsoftware.com/resource/viewurl?encodedUrl=XctVaDS_USpE4vrvFoaXmrVrKn19uAsD-oJ6EaM2LFY&version=1&appsignature=Destiny&appversion=10.5.6.0+%28RC6%29>.
"Firstworldwar.com." First World War.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Mar. 2013.
Mata Hari. Photographer. Encyclopædia Britannica Image Quest. Web. 19 Mar 2013. Http://quest.eb.com/images/115_2727031. Digital image. N.p., n.d. Web.
Mata Hari. Photographer. Encyclopædia Britannica Image Quest. Web. 21 Mar 2013. Http://quest.eb.com/images/115_2737402
"Mata Hari." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 22 Mar. 2013. Web. 23 Mar. 2013.
"The National Archives | Exhibitions & Learning Online | First World War | Spotlights on History." The National Archives | Exhibitions & Learning Online | First World War | Spotlights on History. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Mar. 2013.
N.p.: Mata Hari. Photographer. Encyclopædia Britannica Image Quest. Web. 19 Mar 2013. Http://quest.eb.com/images/115_2729674, n.d.
Platt, Richard, Geoff Dann, and Steve Gorton. Spy. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1996. Print.
"Revealed: Skin Messages, Invisible Ink and More Secret WWI Spycraft." Wired.com. Conde Nast Digital, 17 Apr. 0011. Web. 21 Mar. 2013.
The Sinking Of The Turkish Battleship Messudiyeh By Submarine B11 On 13th December 1914 . Fine Art. Encyclopædia Britannica Image Quest. Web. 21 Mar 2013. Http://quest.eb.com/images/108_282964
"The Sting - Enabling Codebreaking in the Twentieth Century." Http://www.sweetsearch.com/. N.p., n.d. Web.
Von Rintelen. Photographer. Encyclopædia Britannica Image Quest. Web. 21 Mar 2013. Http://quest.eb.com/images/115_873701
WILHELM CANARIS (1887-1945). - German Naval Officer.. Fine Art. Encyclopædia Britannica Image Quest. Web. 21 Mar 2013. Http://quest.eb.com/images/140_1662028
"SMS Magdeburg." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 28 Mar. 2013. Web. 28 Mar. 2013. Works Cited Thanks For Watching!!
:) (EE- pruh) (He actually worked for the MI5) It says EDGEMONT because Samuel F. B. Morse is the man who created morse code and that is where he lived.

p.s. Edgemont is here in Westchester! 2. and stragegies
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