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Adverbs

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Krista Dotson

on 6 December 2010

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Transcript of Adverbs

Adverbs What are they?? Let's explore them together. An adverb is a word that modifies (describes) a verb, an adjective, or another adverb.
- Explorers eagerly chase adventure.
-Eagerly is an adverb because it is modifying the verb, chase.
- Some explorers visit amazingly beautiful places.
-Amazingly is an adverb because it is modifying the adjective, beautiful.
- Others quite bravely explore the unknown- space.
- Quite is an adverb because it is modifying the adverb, bravely, which is modifying the verb explore. I know it's a lot of information. But I promise, it will help you. it's also a lot easier than you think. so don't throw a fit :-) Adverbs answer the questions how, when, where, or to what extent.
- How? suddenly, carefully, sadly
- When? now, later, soon
- Where? there, up, ahead
- To What Extent? completely, totally, fully Adverbs can appear in different positions in sentences.
The tourists boarded the bus eagerly. (after the verb)
The tourists eagerly boarded the bus. (before the verb)
Eagerly, the tourists boarded the bus. (at the beginning)
Adverbs that modify adjectives or other adverbs usually come directly before the words they modify. They usually answer the question to what extent.
Marco Polo told really wonderful tales of China.
Really modifies the adjective, wonderful.
People were very eager to hear his stories.
Very modifies the adjective, eager.
They nearly always hung on every word.
Nearly modifies the adverb, always. Many adverbs are formed by adding the suffix, -ly to the end of an adjective. Sometimes the spelling if the base word changes when –ly is added.
Near: add –ly to make it an adverb- nearly
Gentle: drop the e and add –ly to make it an adverb- gently
Easy: change the y to i and add –ly to make it an adverb- easily
Comparative adverbs The comparative form of an adverb is used when you compare a person or thing with one other person or thing.
He finished sooner than she did.
If the adverb has one syllable, add an –er to make it comparative.
slow = slower
soon = sooner
If the adverb has two or more syllables, add more to the beginning to make it comparative.
calmly = more calmly
briskly = more briskly
Superlative adverbs The superlative form of an adverb is used when you are comparing a person or thing with more than one other person or thing.
He is the quickest of the three boys.
If the adverb has one syllable, add an –est to make it superlative.
slow = slowest
soon = soonest
If the adverb has two or more syllables, add most to the beginning to make it superlative.
Calmly = most calmly
Briskly = most briskly
OTHER THINGS TO KNOW.... Use only one sign of comparison at a time.
Do NOT use more and –er together or most and –est together.
Incorrect: That beach has the most whitest sand.
Correct: That beach has the whitest sand.
The comparative and superlative forms of some adjectives and adverbs are completely different words:
good, better, best
bad, worse, worst
well, better, best
much, more, most
little, less, least
And now for our feature presentation :-)
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