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School-to-Prison Pipeline

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Madison McPadden

on 21 May 2014

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Transcript of School-to-Prison Pipeline

Refers to school policy that assigns explicit, pre-determined punishments to rule violations, regardless of the situation or context in which the behavior occurred

Punishments are often severe, including suspension and expulsion for even minor incidents
Examples of Zero-tolerance used in "Minor" Offenses
6 year old
kindergartener handcuffed, arrested, fingerprinted, charged with a felony and sent to jail after throwing a temper tantrum over jellybeans
13 year old
girl strip-searched after being suspected of possessing non-prescription ibuprofen
5 year old
suspended and threatened with expulsion while playing cops and robbers on the playground.
16 year old
was expelled for bringing a nail clipper to school.
12 year old
was arrested and handcuffed after he returned a punch after being hit by a classmate.
2nd grader
was suspended for sexual harassment after smacking another second grader on the bottom


Narrative Comparison
Michael and James are students at Orca Elementary School. Michael is an African-American male and James is a Caucasian male. Both students attend the same schools, are in the same classes and have the same academic and learning ability.
Michael
Age: 6 Months
James
Age: 6 Months
Narrative Comparison
Michael
Age: 6 Years
James
Age: 6 Years
Likes school
Likes to draw
Best friend is Michael

Narrative Comparison
Unknowingly brought a pocketknife to school
First incident
Police refused to believe it was accidental

Michael
Age: 8 Years
James
Age: 8 Years
Knowingly brought a pocketknife for Show and Tell
First incident
Parents were involved only

Narrative Comparison
Caught cheating on test
Suspended for three days

Michael
Age: 12 Years
James
Age: 12 Years
Caught cheating on test
Parents were involved only

Narrative Comparison
Skipping class
Arrested for inappropriate sexual contact
Punishment - arrested and booked
Released and found not guilty
Michael
Age: 15 Years
James
Age: 15 Years
Skipping class
Only parents were involved
Punishment - parents grounded him for two week

Narrative Comparison
Expelled out of high school
started alternative School
Dropped out
two years later ended up in jail

Michael
Age: 18 Years
James
Age: 18 Years
Completed all my advanced classes
Had a partial scholarship to state university
Went on to grad school

How can school districts divert the
school-to-prison pipeline?

1.
Increase the use of
positive behavior
interventions and supports.
2.
Compile
annual reports
on the total number of disciplinary actions that push students out of the classroom based on gender, race and ability.
3.
Create agreements with police departments and court systems to
limit arrests at school
and the use of restraints, such as mace and handcuffs.
4.
Provide simple
explanations
of infractions and prescribed responses in the student code of conduct to ensure fairness.
5.
Create appropriate limits on the
use of law enforcement
in public schools.
6.

Train teachers
on the use of positive behavior supports for at-risk students.
Educational Inequality Does Not Need to Continue
Real Life Example of the
Effects of Zero-tolerance

Local Seattle Organizations and Agencies that Work
with School-to-Prison Pipeline
America Reads
http://americareads.as.ucsb.edu/get-involved/

NewHolly Teen Center
http://www.seattlehousing.org/redevelopment/newholly/community/

East African Community Center
http://www.eastafricancs.org/get-involved

Seattle Young People's Project
http://sypp.org/get-involved/

Urban Youth Justice
http://urbanyouthjustice.wordpress.com/stpp/



References/Sources
Acluvideos. (2013, September 20). Gone Too Far: Our Kids in Handcuffs [Video file]. Retrieved from
http://www.tolerance.org/magazine/number-43-spring-2013/school-to-prison

Neuman, S. (n.d.). Violence in schools: How big a problem is it?
NPR
. Retrieved May 15, 2014, from http://www.npr.org/2012/03/16/148758783/violence-in-schools-how-big-a-problem-is-it

Parker, D. (2014, May 17). Segregation 2.0: America's school-to-prison pipeline. msnbc.com. Retrieved from http://www.msnbc.com/msnbc/brown-v-board-students-criminalized

The School-to-Prison Pipeline. (n.d.). Teaching Tolerance. Retrieved May 18, 2014, from http://www.tolerance.org/magazine/number-43-spring-2013/school-to-prison

Suspension Stories. 2012. Are Our Children Being Punished into Prison. [Image file]. Retrieved from http://www.suspensionstories.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/STPPgraphic.jpg

U.S. Department of Education Office for Civil Rights. (2014). Civil rights data collection: Data snapshot (School discipline) (Issue Brief No. 1) Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, Retrievedfrom http://ocrdata.ed.gov/Downloads/CRDC-School-Discipline-Snapshot.pdf

Zero Tolerance & Loss of Freedom . (n.d.). Kjos Ministries. Retrieved May 18, 2014, from http://www.crossroad.to/News/zero.html


Spread awareness about educational inequality
Advocate on behalf of local students
Participate in in-school or after-school programs
Tutor undervalued students, empower them to succeed
Challenge youth to be their best self as a mentor
Volunteer with organizations/associations passionate about demolishing the school-to-prison pipeline
68%
of all males in state and federal
PRISON
do not have a high school
DIPLOMA


70%
of students involved in "in-school"
ARRESTS
or referred to law enforcement are black or latino

Despite the fact that
16%
of all students enrolled in U.S. public schools are black, while
51%
are white. Nevertheless, black students are suspended and expelled at
three times
the rate of white students.

What is Zero-tolerance Policy?
The School-to-Prison Pipeline forces students, especially students of color, out of the educational system and into the criminal justice system

"Police officers have become a regular and growing presence in schools across America, particularly in low-income neighborhoods and communities of color."

- DENNIS PARKER, ACLU RACIAL JUSTICE PROGRAM DIRECTOR
Source: Parker, D. (2014) Segregation 2.0: America's school-to-prison pipeline.
msnbc.com
, from: http:www.msnbc.com/msnbc/brown-v-board-students-criminalized
The intent of zero-tolerance policy was to combat heightened student safety concerns and to deter illegal or dangerous behavior from students.

Whatever the cause, the zero-tolerance policies have gone too far in schools across the country, resulting in criminalization of the classroom.



Source: Nueman, S. (2014). Violence in schools: How big a problem is it? NPR. http://www.npr.org/2012/03/16/148758793
Criminalization of student misbehavior extends to even the youngest students... In Texas, students as young as 6 have been ticketed at school in the past five years, and it is not uncommon for elementary school students to be ticketed by school-based law enforcement.
Source: U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights. (2014) Civil rights data collection: Data snapshot - School disciple (Issue Brief No. 1) Washington, DC: US. Government Prining Office, from http://ocrdata.edu.gov/downloads/CRDC-School-Discipline-Snapshot.pdf
Source: U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights. (2014) Civil rights data collection: Data snapshot - School disciple (Issue Brief No. 1) Washington, DC: US. Government Prining Office, from http://ocrdata.edu.gov/downloads/CRDC-School-Discipline-Snapshot.pdf
Source: Suspension Stories. 2012. Are Our Children Being Punished into Prison. [Image file]. Retrieved from http://www.suspensionstories.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/STPPgraphic.jpg
Likes school
Best friend is James
Likes to play basketball

While black students represent
16%
of student
enrollment
, they represent
27%
of students referred to
law enforcement
and
31%
of students subjected to a
school-related arrest
.
Source: Acluvideos. (2013, September 20). Gone Too Far: Our Kids in Handcuffs [Video file]. Retrieved from
Source: Parker, D. (2014, May 17). Segregation 2.0: America's school-to-prison pipeline.
msnbc.com
. Retrieved from http:/www.msnbc.com/msnbc/brown-v-board-students-criminalized
Source: Zero Tolerance & Loss of Freedom . (n.d.). Kjos Ministries. Retrieved May 18, 2014, from http://www.crossroad.to/News/zero.html
Source: Study: With more police in schools, students in Dallas and other big Texas districts get more tickets. (n.d.). The Dallas Morning News. Retrieved May 18, 2014, from http://www.dallasnews.com/news/education/headlines/20110109-study-with-more-police-in-schools-students-in-dallas-and-other-big-texas-districts-get-more-tickets.ece
Source: Suspension Stories. 2012. Are Our Children Being Punished into Prison. [Image file]. Retrieved from http://www.suspensionstories.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/STPPgraphic.jpg
Source: The School-to-Prison Pipeline. (n.d.). Teaching Tolerance. Retrieved May 18, 2014, from http://www.tolerance.org/magazine/number-43-spring-2013/school-to-prison

Described as an effort of federal state and local policies that leads African American youth in particular, and other youth of color away from high school completion and towards involvement with the criminal justice system

This source of injustice involves policies that are centered on enforcement of punishment justified through the intent to create a safe school environment

Source: TeamChild. (2011).
Introduction: The school to prison pipeline in Washington state.
Retrieved http://www.teamchild.org/stp/introduction
What is School-to-Prison Pipeline?
How you can stop the school-to-prison pipeline?
Modify the zero tolerance policy and educating administrative staff on best practices in regulating sanctions or punishments for inappropriate conduct.

Engage parents/guardians in the students' academic and behavioral progress, in new ways including:
Orientation and information sessions on school 'survival skills'
Information on culturally sensitive communication and interaction
Emphasis on the importance of student civil rights

Eliminate targeting youth of color and equally distributing punishment for all students. Reducing long term suspensions, reevaluating current expulsion standards and ensuring youth have alternate options, such as:
In-school suspension
After-school detention
In-school restriction
Mandatory service learning
THE SCHOOL TO PRISON PIPELINE:
CHALLENGING THE ZERO TOLERANCE POLICY IN OUR NATION'S SCHOOLS

SUPPORT CHANGE FOR OUR CHILDREN TODAY.
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