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The Philosophy of Veganism

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Mike Koegle

on 17 February 2015

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Transcript of The Philosophy of Veganism

The Philosophy of Veganism:
No Animals Were Harmed in the Making of This Presentation

The Logistics
What is
veganism
?

But
why
would you do this to yourself?

Common Misconceptions
According to a 2009 study from
The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
, "vegan diets tend to be higher in:
dietary fiber, magnesium, folic acid, vitamin C, vitamin E, and iron
,
and lower in:

calories, saturated fat, cholesterol, [and] long-chain omega-3 fatty acids.
"
veg-an-ism
\ve-ge-ni-zem\: is the practice of abstaining from the use of animal products, particularly in diet, as well as following an associated philosophy that rejects the commodity status of sentient animals. A follower of veganism is known as a
vegan
.
Source: Wikipedia
Image used without artist's consent
References, Resources, and Additional Readings
Environmental Veganism
Ethical Veganism
Personal Health Veganism
- reduced saturated fat intake (improves overall cardiovascular health and lowers risk of cardiac diseases)
- increased fiber intake (fights colon cancer, healthy bowel movements, and reduces prostate cancer risks)
- introduces more phytochemicals (prevent and fight cancers, work with antioxidants, and boost protective enzymes)
- reduces risk for heart disease (prevention of heart attacks and stroke, as well as reduces blood pressure issues)
- "weapon against Type II Diabletes" (veganism is said to be easier than the recommended ADA Standard Diet)
- combats and prevents various types of cancer (prostate, colon, and breast)
- helps prevent the onset of macular degeneration and cataracts (leafy green, gourds, and fruits support eye health)
- lowers Body Mass Index (BMI) (used as an indicator of health and a lack of fat on the body)
- increases personal energy levels and healthy skin (nuts and vegetables provide essential vitamins for healthy skin)
- longevity (studies indicate that those who adopt vegan lifestyle/diet live three-six years longer on average)
- allergy reduction (75% of humans are allergic to dairy; reduction in dairy/eggs tied to alleviation of allergy symptoms)
Source: Nursingdegree.net
Nutrition
Disease Prevention
Physical Benefits
Source: CulinarySchools.org
Our oceans, rivers, lakes, and watersheds...
Our atmosphere and planetary future...
Food = Fuel
This land is your land, this land is my land...
"It is increasingly obvious that environmentally sustainable solutions to world hunger can only emerge as people eat more plant foods and fewer animal products. To me it is deeply moving that the same food choices that give us the best chance to eliminate world hunger are also those that take the least toll on the environment, contribute the most to our long-term health, are the safest, and are also, far and away, the most compassionate towards our fellow creatures."
-
John Robbins, Author
Diet for a New America
"The time will come when men such as I will look upon the murder of animals as they now look upon the murder of men."
- Leonardo Da Vinci
"My refusing to eat meat occasioned inconveniency, and I have been frequently chided for my singularity. But my light repast allows for greater progress, for greater clearness of head and quicker comprehension."

-Benjamin Franklin
Professor Mike Koegle BICM, M.A.
Special Education Specialist/Science & Technology
Sequoia School, William S. Hart Union HSD


Campbell, C. & Campbell, T. (2005).
The China Study.
BenBella Books.
Fuhrman, J. (2003).
Eat to Live!
Little Brown & Co
.
Mason, J. & Singer, P. (2006).
The Way We Eat: Why Our Food Choices Matter.
Rodale.
Popper, P. & Merzer, G. (2013).
Food Over Medicine
. BenBella Books.


Literature
Film/Media

Fat, Sick, & Nearly Dead
. A Joe Cross Film (2010)
Food, Inc.
A Robert Kenner Film (2008)
Food Matters
. Colquhoun J. & Ledesma, C. (2008)
Forks Over Knives
. A Lee Fulkerson Film (2011)
From Farm to Fridge
. YouTube.com
Vegucated
. Wolfson, M. (2011)
Online Resources

VegNews Magazine
www.vegnews.com


Vegetarian Resource Group
www.vrg.org

VegSource.com
www.vegsource.com

theveganr.d.
www.theveganrd.com

The Reasonable Vegan
www.rvgn.org

The Vegan Society
www.vegansociety.com

Making Vegan Easy
www.vegan.com

OhSheGlows Recipes
www.ohsheglows.com

Vegan Health
www.veganhealth.org
Broccoli/Sirloin Comparison from spectrumwellness.net
Okay, let's do a little math...
...to eat or not to eat, that is the question...

People for the Ethic Treating of Animals
www.peta.org
Veganism is a way of living which seeks to exclude, as far as is possible and practicable, all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food, clothing or another purpose.
Saf Restaurant/Saf Express, London England
Source: VeganSociety.com
So, basically...
Source: AnimalEquality.net
According to
Animal Equality
, a Los Angeles-based animal rights organization, 56 billion farmed animals are killed each year for human consumption. That breaks down to 3,000 animals per second worldwide. These staggering statistics do not account for the millions of tons of oceanic life caught each year for human consumption.
Source: USDA
But we need meat so that we can feed the world, right?
This view does not take into consideration the unanimous cry from the vegan community to end cruelty and celebrate sentience
Pollotarian, Pescatarian
Source: FSA
Source: FSA
So, what do vegans really eat?...
Fruits, vegetables, grains, legumes, herbs, fungi, just nothing that has anything to do with other sentient, living creatures!

One Green Planet
www.onegreenplanet.org
To Perpetuate the Stereotype, Let's Make Some...Hummus!
Roasted Red Pepper Hummus
Hummus Caprese
Ingredients
The Journey
Ingredients
The Journey
2 cups chickpeas (cooked, drained, and cooled)
2 Roasted and peeled Red Bell Peppers
1/4 cup Tahini (stirred and mixed
thoroughly
)
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
1-2 garlic cloves, minced
2 Tbsp. Extra Virgin Olive Oil
1/2 tsp. cumin, ground
pinch of cayenne pepper
pinch of Kosher salt (optional)

Roast peppers by placing flat, cored halves skin-side up approximately 5-6 inches under broiler for 10-12 minutes. Then place in covered bowl or bag to allow steaming to loosen skins. Remove skins after 5-8 minutes in bowl/bag and moderately dice peppers.

In a food processor, blend together tahini, oil oil, lemon juice, minced garlic, cayenne pepper, cumin, and salt (optional) for 30 seconds. Scrape sides and process for an addition two minutes. The mixture will begin to "cream" or "whip" up nicely.

Add chickpeas to food processor in two steps, half at a time. Be diligent in scraping sides with every addition. Add most of the roasted peppers, leaving some for garnish. Continue blending/processing for 1-2 minutes until smooth. If the consistency is too grainy, add a couple tablespoons of water while processing.

Scrape the hummus into your display bowl with a small well in the middle for your roasted pepper garnish. Dash of cayenne/cumin to finish. Serve with warmed pita chips.

2 cups chickpeas (cooked, drained, and cooled)
3-4 Roma tomatoes, diced and seeded
10-12 basil leaves, cleaned and cut
1/4 cup Tahini (stirred and mixed
thoroughly
)
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
1-2 garlic cloves, minced
2 Tbsp. Extra Virgin Olive Oil
1/2 tsp. cumin, ground
pinch of Italian Seasonings
pinch of Kosher salt (optional)

Dice and seed tomatoes. Wash and cut basil leaves (with shears) and set aside for garnish.

In a food processor, blend together tahini, oil oil, lemon juice, minced garlic, cumin, and salt (optional) for 30 seconds. Scrape sides and process for an addition two minutes. The mixture will begin to "cream" or "whip" up nicely.

Add chickpeas to food processor in two steps, half at a time. Be diligent in scraping sides with every addition. Continue blending/processing for 1-2 minutes until smooth. If the consistency is too grainy, add a couple tablespoons of water while processing.

Scrape the hummus into your display bowl with a small well in the middle for your diced tomato and basil garnish. Dash of Italian Seasonings/cumin to finish. Serve with baguette crisps.
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