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Present Perfect Simple and Present Perfect Continuous

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by

Ángel Mogollón

on 25 May 2014

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Transcript of Present Perfect Simple and Present Perfect Continuous

Present Perfect Continuous with "how long", "for" and "since"
Structure
Use 1:
We use the Present Perfect Continuous to talk about actions that
started in the past
and that
continue to the present.
Use 2:
FOR vs SINCE
We use FOR and SINCE to talk about periods of time from the past to the present.
Present Perfect Simple and Present Perfect Continuous
She started to work 40 years ago, but she continues being a doctor in the present.
FOR
FOR is used to talk about periods of time (=The duration of the action).
It answers questions with "how long".
SINCE
We use FOR to talk about points of time (=It mentions when the action started).
It answers questions with "when".
Examples:
For forty years, for five hours, for a minute, etc.
How long has he been teaching? FOR 10 years. (=This is the duration of the action).
Examples:
Since 1965, since last year, since 2004, since six o'clock
When did he start teaching? He started in 1996. So, he's been teaching since 1996.
IMPORTANT!
IMPORTANT!
These phrases are used with Present Perfect Continuous, but they don't need FOR or SINCE:
All day
All my life
All morning
All month
All week
All year
Don't use FOR or SINCE with Present Simple.
PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS AND PRESENT PERFECT SIMPLE
1. In many cases, you can use the Present Perfect Simple and the Present Perfect Continuous with FOR and SINCE, and the meaning won't be different.


I've been living in this house for over a year.
=
I've lived in this house for over a year.
PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS AND PRESENT PERFECT SIMPLE
2. If a verb describes a state ( example like, love, be, have, see, know) we DON'T use the PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS.

Don't say:
We've been knowing each other for more than fifty years.

Say:
We've known each other fore more than fifty years.
Full transcript