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FDR First Inaugural Address

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by

Mary Psaltakis

on 2 December 2013

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Transcript of FDR First Inaugural Address

Franklin D. Roosevelt
First Inaugural Address

Wrap up
Franklin D. Roosevelt did a wonderful job in using persuasive techniques to gain his audience's attention and support for his beliefs. His
parallelism
and
varying sentence length
allows him to show great emphasis for his main points, while his use of
personification
and
metaphors
appeals to
pathos
causing his audience to feel a great sense of unity and hope for their nations' restoration.
"The Only Thing we Have to Fear is Fear Itself"
Literary Techniques
Metaphors
Parallelism
Length of Sentences
Personification
Pathos
Metaphors
"
We
must move as a
trained and loyal army
willing to sacrifice for the good of a common discipline"
Parallelism
Roosevelt uses parallelism throughout his entire speech to allow the speech to be read smoothly. He also uses parallelism to help emphasize his beliefs.
Sentence Length
Personification
Roosevelt uses personification within his speech to help prove his points and to help inspire the American people.
Pathos
Roosevelt appeals to pathos by persuading his readers that they can find joy and happiness in their lives. He also appeals to his audience's emotions by presenting all citizens as one united group, including the highest and lowest of classes, critically needed in order to restore the Nation.
Background Information
Franklin D. Roosevelt was born in New York in 1882. He is a cousin of Theodore Roosevelt who was also a president and an icon in American History. In 1905 he married his distant cousin and had 6 children. but only 5 survived. In 1921 he caught polio while on vacation and never regained function in his legs. He became president during the Great Depression (1933). His First Inaugural Address was given during a time of economic hardship with the fear of war consuming the minds of the American people.
It can be helped by preventing
realistically

the tragedy of the growing through foreclosure of our small homes and our farms.
It can be helped

by
insistence that the Federal, State, and local governments act forthwith on the demand that their cost be drastically reduced.
It can be helped

by
unifying of relief activities which today are often scattered,
uneconomical
, and
unequal
.
It can be helped by
national planning for and supervision of all forms of
transportation
and of
communications
and other utilities.
"Recognition of the falsity of material wealth as the standard of success goes hand in hand with the abandonment of the false belief that
p
ublic office and high
p
olitical
p
osition are to be valued only by the standards of
p
ride of
p
lace and
p
ersonal
p
rofit; and there must be an end to a conduct in banking and in business which too often has given to a sacred trust the likeness of callous and selfish wrongdoing
.
Small wonder that confidence languishes, for it thrives only
on honesty
,
on honor
,
on the sacredness of obligations
,
on faithful protection
,
on unselfish performance
; without them it cannot live
.

Restoration calls, however, not for changes in ethics alone
.
This
N
ation asks for
action
, and
action
now
.


Roosevelt uses metaphors to relate all the citizens of the United States of America to one strong united army, which he will proudly lead. He also uses this connection to an army as a way to show his audience that this can be their united stance for their war against the economic struggles they are facing.
"
Happiness
lies not in the mere possession of money; it lies in the
joy
of achievement, in the
thrill
of creative effort."
Nature
still
offers

her bounty and human efforts have multiplied it.
These dark
days
will be worth all they costs us if they
teach
us that our true destiny is not to be ministered unto but to minister ourselves and to our fellow men.
"
I
assume unhesitatingly the
leadership of this great army of our people
"
Roosevelt strategically varies his sentence length in order to create contrast and emphasize the main points he is striving to make. In this speech he often uses extremely long drawn out sentences filled with a great deal of information, parallelism, and other techniques, followed by short sentences filled with charged language.
"Through this program of action
we
address
ourselves
to putting
our
own
national house
in order"
Full transcript