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italian renaissance theatre

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odrien ortiola

on 22 August 2013

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Transcript of italian renaissance theatre

Early in the Renaissance,
plays were held in churches and outdoors.
ITALIAN THEATER
The Italian Renaissance gave birth to many innovations in theater architecture and scene design, including the proscenium arch stage, painted-flat wings and Torelli's mechanized
pole-and-chariot system.
RENAISSANCE:
CONTRIBUTIONS TO THEATER
Neoclassical ideal in playwriting and criticism
Italianate staging and architecture
Commedia dell’Arte
PLAYWRIGHTS
COSTUMES
Costumes and fashion was derived from Roman arts. Gothic was very popular in Europe but it never picked up in Italy.
THE ACTOR'S LIFE
Just like the plays, the actors mirrored Romans and Greeks, all female roles were given to males.
Acting was a full-time job. An actor would have just one role.

ITALIAN RENAISSANCE
RENAISSANCE
***
The revival of art and literature under the influence of classical models in the 14th–16th centuries.
Around 1485,
Italian rulers began to finance productions of Roman plays and imitations of them.
This prompted interest in rewriting Roman plays into Italian as well as the writing of new plays.
One of first important vernacular tragedy was Sofonisha by Giangiorgio Trissino. A chorus of 15 was used, in keeping with the number in the Roman choruses.
Between the 14th and 16th centuries Renaissance drama developed in Italy, marking an end to medieval practices and a release of traditional Roman ways of presenting drama.
Proscenium arch
An arch framing the opening between the stage and the auditorium in some theaters.
FLATS
The invention of perspective painting in the 14th and 15th centuries led to painted scenery that attempted to create the illusion of reality.
CHARIOT-AND-POLE SYSTEM
A system of ropes and pulleys helped get a simultaneous shift of scenery (flats attached to pole).
The architects of the Renaissance derived their architecture in part from a revived interest in Roman and Greek ruins, from the change of classical texts on architecture, particularly the Roman writer Vitruvius's ten books on architecture.
by Giacomo Torelli
Interest in the ancient "rediscovered" classics – based more on Roman (where Italy now stood) than on Greek
Verisimilitude: "truth seeming" – what is truth?
Decorum:
characters were expected to display traits normally held by members of their class, or to suffer ridicule or punishment if not.
Good was to be rewarded, and evil punished – there was an eternal truth.
Purity of Genres:
Comedy and tragedy were not to be mixed – NO element of one should be in the other.
The Three Unities: -- for verisimilitude.

Unity of Time: --required a reasonable time – no more than 24 hours – or actual time.

Unity of Place: --no more than one room, place or a town

Unity of Action: --no sub-plots, counter-plots, secondary plots--


Five act form:
probably derived form Horace and Seneca
Two-fold purpose:
to teach and to please.
CENTRAL CONCEPTS
The commedia, the "comedy of professional artists," was the popular theatre of Renaissance Italy
There were no scripts. All of the dialogue and much of the business was improvised.
Pantalone – the old man, a fool
Dottore – the doctor, a drunk or glutton
Capitano – braggart soldier
Inamorati – the young lovers – the only "normal" characters
"zanni" -- foolish servants; Harlequin (or Arlecchino) was the most popular

CHARACTERS
LUDOVICO ARIOSTO
Influenced by Tibullus and Horace
Wrote comedies like Cassaria, I suppositi, Il Ignorante, La Lena and I studenti
Torquato Tasso
His two most significant pieces were Aminta(1573) and King Torrismondo(1578)
Niccolo Machiavelli
He was a politician, philosopher and writer who got involved in some controversial political matters.
He is best known for his adaptation of "The Prince" -a political novel and "Mandaragola"
Rediscovery of Roman writers
– Vitruvius: Scene Design
– Horace: How to write a play
Single Point of Perspective
• Scenery with wings that recede
to the vanishing point
scenery was behind the proscenium arch – a background for action
"raked" stage – higher in back (UP-stage), tilting down to the front (DOWN-stage) – to increase the sense of depth – although sometimes the acting area was level
By 1550, the periaktoi, triangular flats were used for changing wings
ITALIANATE STAGING
Pietro Aretino
Called the “scourge of princes” because his satire focused more on the corruption of the Italian society

Angelo Beolco (1502—1542)
Represents a major link between the Comedia Erudiita and Commedia dell’arte

Aberto Musato
Earliest known playwright to have written tragedy

Giambattista Chinthio (1504-1573)
-major tragic playwright
-focused on what Italian audience would enjoy

MEN'S COSTUME
Consisted of short doublet with puffed-out trunk hose, an ankle length gown with shoulder pats and plain shoes
WOMEN'S COSTUME
Women's roles were played by men. Their headdresses were commonly worn as they differed in style and material from which social class you belonged to. In theatre, the headdresses were used in order to display which social ranking a women had.
In addition, the hoopskirt, also known as the farthingale, had a cartwheel or drum-shaped appearance. Combined with ballooned sleeves and expanded ruffs or circular lace collars, it made a woman appear formidable or even unapproachable.
INFLUNCE OF ITALIAN RENAISSANCE
Sketch Comedy
Improvisational scenes
Theater structure
END OF REPORT
ORTIOLA, KEVIN ODRIEN C.
OASAN, JOANNE ELI
CRISPIN, MARIA INNA LOUISE
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