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Elena Drautz

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Business Value Goals Design of a new or changed service for introduction into the live environment
Identify and address the management and operational requirements
essential part of Service Design
reduce the possibility of issues arising in later stages of the Service Lifecycle Objectives Design easily maintainable and enhanceable services
Design efficient and effective processes
Design secure and resilient technologies
Design measurement methods and metrics
Maintain methods for designing solutions
Identify and manage risks
Develop skills Key Principles Scope People The Four Ps Processes Products Partners 3. Technology Architectures and Management Systems 1. Service
Solution 2. Service Management Systems and Tools 4. Process 5. Measurement Methods and Metrics Five Aspects of Design ITIL (2009): Passing your ITIL Foundation Exam, S. 49
ITIL® (2009): ITIL® v3 Foundation Handbook, S. 42
Image: http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRgJKGONThvcFJ7LZdi8S3xLmaR9n_j9kMtbAcxTwowK_1pHGYA ITIL (2009): Passing your ITIL Foundation Exam, p. 49
ITIL® (2009): ITIL® v3 Foundation Handbook, p. 42 f.
Rudd, C. & Lloyd, V. (2007): Service Design: Office of Government Commerce (Itil), p. 31
Image: data:image/jpeg;base64,/9j/4AAQSkZJRgABAQAAA Requirements
Extracted from the Service Portfolio
Analyzed, documented and agreed
Used as a basis for the design of new or changed service

The solution is then passed to the Service Transition and later to the Service Operation stage Reduced costs
Improved consistency of service and better integration with infrastructure components
Simpler implementation
Improved quality of service
Improved service alignment to ensure changed service match business needs
More effective Service Management and processes ITIL® (2009): ITIL® v3 Foundation Handbook, p. 43 f.
Image: http://t1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSRQNHSOeCbmdjHPr5bFnR8ceUxmuzu6gzJirJPDlzxVm9wG7qu Service Design "The Service Design stage takes business requirements and creates services, their supporting practices and management tools which meet business demands for quality, reliability and flexibility." ITIL (2009): Passing your ITIL Foundation Exam, p. 45 ff. ITIL (2009) Holistic approach for all Service Design areas ensuring consistency and integration across the entire IT technology
Balancing act between
Functionality requirements and the performance requirements (Service Utility and Service Warranty)
Skills, technology, people, budget, costs
Timescale constraints 1. Service Solution (1/3) Design of new or changed service solutions to meet changing business needs (marketing)
Formal and structured approach
Balance of functionality, cost, and timing
Interactive and incremental process
Flexible enough to adapt to changing requirements identified during the process ITIL (2009): Passing your ITIL Foundation Exam, p. 50
ITIL® (2009): ITIL® v3 Foundation Handbook, p. 51 1. Service Solution -
Tasks (2/3) Analyze business requirements
Design service solution
Create Service Acceptance Criteria (SAC)
Agree on the costs
Continuously re-evaluate and confirm the benefits for the business
Agree on Service Level Requirements (SLRs)
Ensure the solution service is in accordance with the other key aspects
Ensure governance controls are considered
Establish an organizational readiness assessment
Identify requirements for suppliers and supporting contracts ITIL (2009): Passing your ITIL Foundation Exam, p. 51 1. Service Solution -
Service Design Package (3/3) ITIL (2009): Passing your ITIL Foundation Exam, p. 51
Rudd, C. & Lloyd, V. (2007): Service Design: Office of Government Commerce (Itil), p. 367 "A Service Design Package is a document defining all aspects of an IT service and its requirements through each stage of its lifecycle."

= SDP
Designed for each new service, major change or removal of a service
Output from the processes, methods and techniques
Applied through Service Design
Passed on to Service Transition
Foundation document for subsequent testing, introduction and operation of the service ITIL (2009) 2. Service Management Systems and Tools New or changed service should
Be consistent with all other services it depends on or interfaces with
Support existing services in order to meet the needs of all stakeholders
If not, adaptations of either product are required

The Service Portfolio is the most critical management system at the current stage of the lifecycle and describes all of a provider's services in terms of business value.
It includes:
Service Pipeline
Service Catalogue
Retired Services Catalogue ITIL (2009): Passing your ITIL Foundation Exam, p. 51
ITIL® (2009): ITIL® v3 Foundation Handbook, p. 52
Rudd, C. & Lloyd, V. (2007): Service Design: Office of Government Commerce (Itil), p. 58 3. Technology Architectures and Management Systems

“The fundamental organization of a system, embodied in its components, their relationships to each other and to the environment, and the principles guiding its design and evolution. “

Simple and clear set of norms and standards
Ensure capability to operate and maintain new services
Guarantee maximum cohesion with systems and services already in place ITIL (2009): Passing your ITIL Foundation Exam, p. 52 f.
ITIL® (2009): ITIL® v3 Foundation Handbook, p. 52 f.
Rudd, C. & Lloyd, V. (2007): Service Design: Office of Government Commerce (Itil), p. 62 Rudd, C. & Lloyd, V. (2007) Architecture: 4. Process Structured set of activities organized around a set of objectives
Transforms inputs into defined outputs
Continuous review of the outcome by project owner to make sure it meets the objectives

Processes should be
Practical and appropriate
In-built improvement mechanisms (effectiveness and efficiency)
Documented and controlled so they can become repeated and manageable
Consistently measured, controlled and improved

Ensures that the processes, roles, responsibilities and skills
Are capable to operate, support and maintain a new or changed service
If not, revise new service or enhance existing processes ITIL (2009): Passing your ITIL Foundation Exam, p. 53
ITIL® (2009): ITIL® v3 Foundation Handbook, p. 54 f.
Rudd, C. & Lloyd, V. (2007): Service Design: Office of Government Commerce (Itil), p. 74 f. 5. Measurement Methods and Metrics Effectively managed processes and outcomes have to be measured
Measurements and metrics selected need to reflect the process’s objectives
Process measurements need to be appropriate to the level of ability and maturity of the process being measured
Drives behavioral changes in the organization

Four types of metrics
Progress (milestones)
Compliance (with government requirements or regulations)
Effectiveness (deliver the “right” result)
Efficiency (productivity and speed) ITIL (2009): Passing your ITIL Foundation Exam, p. 53
ITIL® (2009): ITIL® v3 Foundation Handbook, p. 55
Rudd, C. & Lloyd, V. (2007): Service Design: Office of Government Commerce (Itil), p. 74 f. Make effective and efficient use of the Four Ps
Ensure the 4 Ps are taken into account at every stage throughout the Service Lifecycle
Achieved through the 5 Key Principles of Design 1. Service Catalogue Management Only part of the Service Portfolio published to consumers
Support sale and delivery of IT services

Single, central source of consistent information on all of the agreed services ITIL (2009): Passing your ITIL Foundation Exam, p. 54
ITIL® (2009): ITIL® v3 Foundation Handbook, p. 58 ff.
Rudd, C. & Lloyd, V. (2007): Service Design: Office of Government Commerce (Itil), p. 101 ff. Service
Catalogue Business
Service
Catalogue Technical
Service
Catalogue Database or structured document
Available, accurate, current, picture of the IT services that are (about to) run operationally
Includes information about deliverables, prices, contact points, ordering and request processes
Details of services as they progress through the design, transition and operation stages of the Service Lifecycle
Support activities and provides basis for analysis Ensure that agreed level of service is provided
Define, document, agree, monitor, measure, report and review consistently
Acts to present the service provider to the business and the business to the service provider
Improves communication and relationship with customers
Ensures proactive improvement measurements are implemented ITIL (2009): Passing your ITIL Foundation Exam, p. 54
ITIL® (2009): ITIL® v3 Foundation Handbook, p. 58 ff. 2. Service Level Management (2/8) -
Service Level Requirements (SLRs) Customer requirement for a service, thus based on business objectives and service expectations
Used to negotiate agreed service level targets
Form the very start for the testing criteria as the service progresses through the lifecycle
Are gradually redefined through the process until it eventually becomes a pilot Service Level Agreement (SLA) ITIL (2009): Passing your ITIL Foundation Exam, p. 56 f.
ITIL® (2009): ITIL® v3 Foundation Handbook, p. 61 ff.
Rudd, C. & Lloyd, V. (2007): Service Design: Office of Government Commerce (Itil), p. 351 ff. Type I
Internal SP 2. Service Level Management (1/8) -
Goals and Objectives Type II
Shared SP Type III
External SP Service
Provider Example
Service Level Management The receptionist asked Brigitte 'Did your stay meet your expectations?'
She had expected the room to be clean, to smell good, and the bed neither to be too soft nor too hard.
Furthermore she had expected hot milk for coffee, fresh fruits as well as cheese and bred for breakfast.
The staff had a warm and friendly attitude towards guests
Most of her expectations were met - except for the hot milk
'Yes, my stay did live up to my expectations.' --> receptionist typed answer into IT system
--> normally they get the feedback from travel agency to discuss service level (restaurant opening hours, room service) ITIL (2009): Passing your ITIL Foundation Exam, p. 49 f.
Image: http://www.google.com/search?q=where+s+the+beef& Please note:
The activities must not happen in isolation
Instead the implication for the other aspects must be taken into account Please note:
The activities must not happen in isolation
Instead the implication for the other Ps must be taken into account Service Design Processes 1. Service Catalogue
Mgmt 2. Service Level
Mgmt 3. Supplier
Mgmt 4. Capacity
Mgmt 5. Availability
Mgmt 6. Service Continuity
Mgmt 7. Information Security
Mgmt Service Level Agreements (SLAs) Based on SLR namely the requirements from the customer
Agreement between service provider and customer(s)
Describes service, records service level targets and responsibilities (on both sides)
May cover multiple services or multiple customers
SLM develops SLAs for all services and ensures the services continues to be delivered in line with the agreements made in the SLA Definition Elena Drautz 183357
Tanja Reuschle 182815 Design of a new or changed service for introduction into the live environment

All processes are necessary in order to produce a high-quality, comprehensive design meeting exactly the business requirements

Consistency with existing processes

Define, document, agree, monitor, measure, report and review consistently assuring that agreed level of service is met

Service Design builds the basis for the following Life Cycle stages, namely Service Transition, Service Operation and Continual Service Improvement
Therefore one should avoid mistakes or issues at an early stage Summary ITIL® (2009): ITIL® v3 Foundation Handbook, p. 65 ITIL V3
Service Design Hochschule Heilbronn
Strategic Information Management
MU2
Prof. Dr. Christine Reck
27.03.2013 Goals, Objectives, Scope & Business Value Key Principles Challenges & Risks Summary 4. Capacity Management (1/2) Ensures that IT capacity meets current and future business requirements in a cost-effective manner
A process extending across the whole Service Lifecycle
Basic concepts
Balance (cost vs resources / supply vs demand)
Capacity plan
Used to manage the resources required to deliver services
Contains scenarios for different predictions of business demand ITIL v3 Foundation (2011): Exam Prep Study Guide: How to pass on your first try, p. 28
ITIL (2009): Passing your ITIL Foundation Exam, p. 62 f.
ITIL® (2009): ITIL® v3 Foundation Handbook, p. 66 ff. 3. Supplier Management Manages suppliers and the service they supply
Provides seamless quality of IT services to the business and ensure that value for money is obtained
Ensures that Underpinning Contracts and agreements with suppliers are aligned to business needs
Basic concepts
Supplier and Contract Database
Achieves consistency and effectiveness in the implementation of the policy (together with roles and responsibilities)
Used to manage supplier contracts throughout their
lifecycle ITIL (2009): Passing your ITIL Foundation Exam, p. 61 f.
ITIL v3 Foundation – Exam Prep Study Guide: How to pass on your first try, p. 26 f. Hotel is too small to employ an electrician of its own
Best experience with the electrician Jacob
Always keeps them informed about the progress of his work as well as any risks for delay
Three-year contract
Hotel can call Jacob at all hours
On the other hand Jacob is the first choice whenever an electrician is needed Example
Supplier Management 4. Capacity Management (2/2) Three sub-processes
Business Capacity Management
Manage capacity to meet future business requirements for IT services
Service Capacity Management
Manage ongoing service performance as detailed in a SLA or SLR
Component Capacity Management
Identify and manage each of the components of the IT Infrastructure ITIL v3 Foundation (2011): Exam Prep Study Guide: How to pass on your first try, p. 28
ITIL (2009): Passing your ITIL Foundation Exam, p. 62 f.
ITIL® (2009): ITIL® v3 Foundation Handbook, p. 66 ff. Only a few weeks a year the hotel manager has to turn customers away from the hotel
Why no expansion then?
Until now, hotel wasn't occupied enough to justify the investment
Based on the trend and the town plans for expanding the nearby industrial area a new wing with rooms is planned Example
Capacity Management 5. Availability Management (1/2) Ensure that the level of service availability deliverd in all services meets current and future business needs, and that the business impact of any unavailability is minimized

Basic concepts
Availability Mgnt is completed at two interconnected levels:
Component Availability: all aspects of component availability involved
Service Availability: all aspects of service availability and the impact of component availability ITIL v3 Foundation (2011): Exam Prep Study Guide: How to pass on your first try, p. 30
ITIL (2009): Passing your ITIL Foundation Exam, p. 63 ff.
ITIL® (2009): ITIL® v3 Foundation Handbook, p. 70 ff. 5. Availability Management (2/2) ITIL v3 Foundation (2011): Exam Prep Study Guide: How to pass on your first try, p. 30
ITIL (2009): Passing your ITIL Foundation Exam, p. 63 ff.
ITIL® (2009): ITIL® v3 Foundation Handbook, p. 70 ff. Brigitte plans to come back to the hotel next month
„If you make a reservation a few days ahead there is usually no problem“ Example
Availability Management Key aspects
Availability (ability of a service to perform an agreed function)
Reliability (freedom from operational failure)
Maintainability (measure of how quickly and effectively a service can be restored to normal working after a failure)
Serviceability (ability of a third-party supplier to meet the terms of their contract, managed by supplier management) Process
Activities Reactive
Activities Monitoring, measuring, analysis, reporting and reviewing Proactive
Activities Risk assessment and management, plan and design for new and changed services 6. Service Continuity Management Supports the overall Business Continuity Mgmt by ensuring that the required IT infrastructure and the IT service provision can be recovered within required and agreed business time scales ITIL v3 Foundation (2011): Exam Prep Study Guide: How to pass on your first try, p. 31 A fire destroyed most of an other hotel
The disaster was managed very badly and no one seemed to be prepared for a situation like this
No plan for re-housing the guests
Customer lost confidence
> hotel went bankrupt
> people lost their jobs
Even though the insurance had covered the reconstruction of the hotel Example
Service Continuity Management Basic Concepts Business Continuity Management and Plans Business Impact Analysis Risk
Analysis
Process responsible for managing risks that could impact the business
> reducing risks to an acceptable level, sets the objectives, scope and requirements for IT Service Continuity Management
Strategies and actions to take place to continue Business Processes in the case of a disaster Purpose is to quantify the impact to the business that loss of service would have
hard impact: financial loss
soft impact: public relations, morale, health and safety or competitive advantage
Identifies the most important services to the organization (strategy input)
Defines the recovery requirements for IT services (time, minimum service level, ect.) Assessment of the risks that may give rise to service disruption or security violation
Assessing and reducing normal operational incidents
Used by Availability Management to maintain availability and reliability
Evaluative Assets, Threats and Vulnerabilities 7. Information Security Management Ensures that the confidentiality, integrity and availability of an organization's assets, information, data and IT services is maintained
Basic concept is the Information Security Framework ITIL v3 Foundation (2011): Exam Prep Study Guide: How to pass on your first try, p. 32 Why a peaceful little hotel in the Alps is mounting a card key system
There have been a number of thefts from the hotel, mainly cigarets but also other objects
Plan for improvements: a part of the implementation is to restrict the physical access to the hotel Example
Information Security Management Security Measures
Prevention/Reduction
Detection/Repression
Correction/Recovery
Evaluation Consider the following four perspectives to ensure that a balanced approach to security:
Organizational
Procedural
Physical
Technical Challenges Alignment with current architectural directions, strategies and policies
Use of diverse and disparate technologies and applications
Unclear or changing requirements from the business
Lack of awareness and knowledge of service and business targets requirements
Resistance to planning
Insufficient use of resources
Poor relationships with customers
Only perceived a subtopic ITIL v3 Foundation (2011): Exam Prep Study Guide: How to pass on your first try, p. 57 Risks If maturity levels of 1 process low – impossible to achieve maturity of other processes
Business requirements not clear to staff
Insufficient testing
Lack of coordination between IT and business
Insufficient resources and time ITIL v3 Foundation (2011):Exam Prep Study Guide: How to pass on your first try, p. 57 Main Activities
Tune and optimize services, workloads and resources
Manage and control thresholds
Manage demand
Model and trend utilization
Application sizing Appropriate SLA structure to ensure that all services and all customers are covered in manner best suited to the organization’s needs ITIL (2009): Passing your ITIL Foundation Exam, p. 57
ITIL® (2009): ITIL® v3 Foundation Handbook, p. 62 ff. 2. Service Level Management (3/8) -
SLA Framework SLA
framework Service-
based SLA Customer-
based SLA Multi-
level SLAs Underpinning, internal agreement between a service provider and another part of the same organization that assists with the provision of services
Defines the goods or services to be provided and the responsibilities of both parties
E.g. service provider and procurement department ITIL (2009): Passing your ITIL Foundation Exam, p. 57 f.
ITIL® (2009): ITIL® v3 Foundation Handbook, p. 63 2. Service Level Management (4/8) -
Operational Level Agreement (OLA) Underpinning Contract (UC) Legally binding agreement between service provider and a third party, the supplier
Defines targets and responsibilities that are required to meet agreed service level targets in an SLA Helps monitor and report achievements against service level targets
RAG chart (red, amber, green)
Mostly for the last 12 mths ITIL (2009): Passing your ITIL Foundation Exam, p. 58 f.
ITIL® (2009): ITIL® v3 Foundation Handbook, p. 62
Image: http://www.givainc.com/images/dashboard/dashboard_08.png 2. Service Level Management (5/8) -
Service Level Agreement Monitoring (SLAM) chart Periodically, usually monthly, as a minimum quarterly
Review service achievements with customers
Preview upcoming issues
Valuable input to the Service Improvement Plans




Formal plan to implement improvements to a process or service
Program of prioritized improvement actions, encompassing all services and all processes, together with associated impacts and risks ITIL (2009): Passing your ITIL Foundation Exam, p. 59
ITIL® (2009): ITIL® v3 Foundation Handbook, p. 63
Rudd, C. & Lloyd, V. (2007): Service Design: Office of Government Commerce (Itil), p. 127 2. Service Level Management (6/8) -
Service Reviews Service Improvement Plan (SIP) All agreements must be kept up to date
Still current and comprehensive
Still aligned to business needs and strategy
Ensures that services covered and targets for each are still relevant



Process of planning, coordinating, drafting, agreeing, monitoring and reporting of SLAs
Ensure that the required and cost-justifiable service quality is maintained and gradually improved ITIL (2009): Passing your ITIL Foundation Exam, p. 59 Activities 2. Service Level Management (7/8) -
General Take care to identify and involve the right people within the customer base when drafting and agreeing the SLA (e.g. different targets between manager and staff)
If the organization is new to SLM, carefully select an appropriate service to start with (not too complex)
Agreement on both sides, appropriate involvement from service delivery staff 2. Service Level Management (8/8) -
Challenges ITIL® (2009): ITIL® v3 Foundation Handbook, p. 65 „ Passing your ITIL Foundation Exam”, published by TSO (The Stationery Office Ltd) 2009 (ISBN 9780113312061)

„ Itil V3 Foundation Certification Exam Preparation Course in a Book for Passing the Itil V3 Foundation Exam - The How to Pass on Your First Try – Second Edition” The Art of Service, Emereo Pty Ltd; 2009 (ISBN: 1742440169)

„ ITIL V3 Foundation Handbook”, TSO (The Stationery Office Ltd); 2009 (ISBN-10: 0113311974)

„ Service Design Book (itil)”, TSO (The Stationery Office Ltd); 2007(ISBN-10: 0113310471) Literature ITIL® (2009): ITIL® v3 Foundation Handbook, p. 65 SLA covers one service for all the customers of that service SLA covers agreement with an individual customer group Subdivided in: Corporate level, Customer level, Service level
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