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Leeds accent

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by

Alia Abbas

on 5 March 2013

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Transcript of Leeds accent

Regional variation Leeds Most common phonetic sounds heard in the Leeds accent Jean Aitcheson's theory The damp spoon syndrome "My accent is the thing I hate the most" Leeds accent The Typical Leeds accent Where is Leeds? Loiners Historical Background Leeds Leeds is a city and metropolitan borough in West Yorkshire, England.

Leeds has an estimated population of 751,000. Leeds comes from the name 'Loidis'.

Leeds was anciently a forested area of the Celtic kingdom of Elmet.

The settlement existed at the time of the Norman conquest of England.

In the 17th and 18th centuries Leeds flourished and expanded as a centre of the woolen industry and it continued to expand rapidly in the Industrial Revolution. The nickname for people from Leeds is 'Loiners'.

This is said to come from the area of Briggate as locals referred to numerous nearby streets as 'loins' in the local accent, as a corruption of the word 'lanes'. People who gathered in these loins to gossip were therefore termed Loiners. "Don't , Know, Won't, Snow" "ello, I'm off to shop with our lad" "May accent is the theng ay haate the moehst" In Leeds "the" is not used in their speech.
They use "ta" as a substitute.


This shows signs of the 'Damp spoon syndrome' as missing out the determiner "the" is a sign of laziness when it is a key word in a sentence. Lanes- 'ay' becomes 'oy'- Loins Emphasis on the 'oy' sound becomes "Doehn't, Knoehw, Woehn't, Snoehw" "Hello, I'm going to the shop with my boyfriend" Leeds way of saying it Leeds accent "Ello, I'm off to shop with our lad" Crumbling castle "eeya, it's a wee bit nippy, put wood in hoyle" This is where English language is viewed as an ancient respected language that should be kept as 'perfect' and correct.
Any change to this would be letting the English language down. Standard english "ooh, it's really cold in here, will you please shut the door" Leeds English This is not standard English as most of these words are typical Yorkshire slang which has been spread throughout Yorkshire over time. West Yorkshire Summary The Leeds accent is very different from other accents in England.
The Leeds accent is broader, flatter and more round. for example words like "Doehn't knoehw".

There is a lack of the determiner "the" which is an example taken from Jean Aitcheson's 'Damp Spoon Syndrome theory'.

The typical Yorkshire dialect is also an example of Jean Aitcheson's 'Crumbling Castle' effect which deviates from the standard English. Thank you!
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