Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

CRDSC-Main Causes of Disputes and Prevention Strategies

No description
by

Passerelle bleue

on 14 July 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of CRDSC-Main Causes of Disputes and Prevention Strategies

BEFORE STARTING
Tips for Navigation

Navigate the document using the arrows
at the bottom of the window or the
left
and
right
arrow keys on your keyboard.


To
zoom in
and
zoom out
,
use the
up
and
down
arrow keys
on your keyboard or click
the bottom left SDRCC logo.
Decision maker
without proper
authority or
competence

Decision maker
unfamiliar
with policy or misinterpreting it

Decision-making inconsistent
over time

Complainant
perceiving
an injustice

Decision maker
in conflict of interest

Clear, well-founded, fair and transparent decision-making process
Respect of the principles of natural justice
Clear policy on conflicts of interest
Control
mechanisms / approval involving several
individuals

Decisions
compliant with policies and rules
Responsibilities matching knowledge/skills
Training
of volunteers
Well-written
policies
Communication of policies
Transition process and knowledge transfer
Well kept
minute book
Archiving of documents
The concept of fair play extends beyond how athletes compete on the field and behave on game day; fair play also applies to how sport organization meetings are run and how sport administrators conduct themselves. Whether to create sound policies, to clearly communicate information to all members or to foster an environment free from conflicts of interest, sport administrators have the responsibility to maintain an honest and transparent organization. Given their role as decision makers who help shape the lives of athletes, coaches, officials and support personnel, sport administrators have the ability and the responsibility to establish a level playing field where everyone can succeed and flourish.
This diagram recognizes that disputes are a fact of life, it also implies that good management practices can protect your sport organization by containing disputes or preventing them.
On the outside:
corresponding prevention strategies

Center of the diagram:
common causes
of disputes
When decision-making processes of an organization are not clear and transparent, members can too easily perceive an injustice when a decision is not in their favor. To reduce that risk, your organization can: assign the right people to decision-making roles and clarify to members who decides what (to each coach, administrator, or committee its own area of expertise and authority); specify which decisions require approval by the Board of Directors; when there is room for discretion, be sure it applies strictly to issues that cannot be settled by objective criteria; and ensure that decisions are based on solid facts and that they can be defended if challenged.
The two fundamental principles of natural justice must be respected:
the right to be heard
(the chance to present one’s case, submit evidence and arguments, and to know and respond to allegations made by other parties) and
impartiality
(the decision is made ​​by independent individuals, free from conflict of interest, and having considered all the evidence presented).

The smaller a sport organization is, the more common conflicts of interest are. Conflict of interest refers to a situation whereby an individual has a private or personal interest sufficient enough to appear to influence the objectivity of his or her function as a decision maker (for instance, an athlete’s parent sitting on a board when a decision affecting his or her child is being made). Your organization needs to adopt a clear policy on conflicts of interest to reassure members that individuals making decisions on behalf of the organization do not benefit personally.
Conflict of interest refers to a situation whereby an individual has a private or personal interest sufficient enough to appear to influence the objectivity of his or her function as a decision maker (for example, a businessman who sits on the board while it is making a decision to award a contract to his company). Your organization must have a clear policy allowing members to recognize problematic situations, declare a potential conflict, and voluntarily withdraw from the decision-making process without fear of repercussion
The structure of your organization should reassure its members that the decision-making processes are objective. Some mechanisms can reduce the concerns of bias, such as subjecting major decisions to review and approval by a higher authority (such as committee motions requiring executive or board approval, or coaches’ decisions requiring approval from the high performance committee. Another way of reducing the apprehension of bias is to assign decision-making to groups of individuals (committee or board) rather than to one individual (e.g. president, coach, etc.)
The best way to counter perceptions of subjectivity is to ensure all decisions abide by your organization’s policies and rules. While sometimes the decision maker can “appear” to be in a conflict of interest, the ruling is easier to defend if it correctly applies the policies and rules. In fact, sometimes, a proper decision alone is not good enough: the
process
leading to that decision has to comply with the rules as well.
Policies and rules should clearly identify who (e.g. president, coach, discipline committee, etc.) has the authority to make certain decisions in the implementation of the policy or enforcement of the rules. Any decision made by someone without authority conferred by a policy or rule could be overturned if challenged afterwards. The best way to reduce the risk that decisions are appealed is to ensure that decisions are in compliance with and respectful of the policies and rules adopted by the organization.
It is important to ensure that decisions are made by individuals who are qualified to do so. Decision-making roles should be entrusted to individuals who have at minimum the qualifications needed to carry out the duties of their positions in a reasonable manner. A reorganization of job descriptions may be necessary if elections or resignations leave gaps between skill sets and position requirements.
Individuals enlisted to make decisions on behalf of your organization should receive basic training or orientation that properly acquaints them with their roles and responsibilities and with the policies and rules that they have to respect and implement. Part of this orientation should focus on levels of authority of each position with an emphasis on where such authority ends. Individuals with a certain authority in an organization need to know the issues on which they have control and those under the authority or jurisdiction of another person or another committee.
Many sport organizations rely entirely on volunteers to serve on their Board of Directors, to manage daily operations and, in some cases, to coach or officiate. Individuals enlisted to make decisions on behalf of your organization should receive basic training or orientation, and each individual with a certain authority needs in-depth knowledge of the policies and rules on which his or her decisions are based.
Policies and rules of your organization must be well communicated to decision makers as well as the members to which they apply. It is essential for decision makers to understand both the wording
and
the spirit or intent of each policy or rule. In a situation where a decision maker has to interpret a policy because of an ambiguity in the wording, he or she will be able to do so more effectively if he or she understands the essence of the rule. Members will also be less inclined to challenge decisions if they know how and why they were made.
Not-for-profit organizations have to contend with high turn-over rates among their human resources. For more stability and continuity, it is essential to have a succession plan for a good transfer of information between outgoing and newly elected administrators. For example, one may consider a constitution that calls for multi-year terms of office that overlap, for a past-president’s position, or for elections that allow administrators to be appointed before their term officially takes effect. A good transition process and orientation of newly elected officers will facilitate consistency in decisions made by or on behalf of the organization.
The minute book is an essential tool for the transfer of information between successive administrators. Each board should keep the minute book very diligently and refer to it as often as necessary to ensure consistency in its decisions. Unless there is a desire to consciously change a practice that seems outdated or unreasonable, it should at the very least take stock of and consider the decisions and rulings of past boards.
An organization must maintain archives, not only to meet fiscal and legal compliance, but also for consistency in decisions. For instance, if your code of conduct provides for a discipline committee, all previous decisions of this committee should be available for consultation by future committee members so that interpretations of the code of conduct are consistent when applied to similar situations.
To ensure that your organization operates fairly and equitably, it is essential to follow some basic principles of good governance and create a harmonious environment to reduce the risk of conflicts and disputes. To do this, it is useful to know and understand some
common causes of disputes in sport organizations
. When you are aware of situations that are often a source of dispute, you will be in a better position to prevent them from occurring.
Main Causes of Disputes
and Prevention Strategies

A Must for Sport Administrators
These strategies are based on best practices in management that can be implemented within your sport organization.
Clear, well-founded, fair and transparent
decision-making process
Respect of the principles of natural justice
Clear policy on conflicts of interest
Clear policy on conflicts of interest
Control mechanisms / approval involving several individuals
Decisions compliant with policies and rules
Decisions compliant with policies and rules
Responsibilities matching knowledge/skills
Training of volunteers
Training of volunteers
Communication of policies
Transition process and knowledge transfer
Well kept minute books
Archiving of documents
Whether ambiguous (lack of clarity), incomplete (too many issues open to debate) or inconsistent (contradictions between clauses), a poorly written policy creates a tremendous risk of confusion and dissension within an organization. Despite the decision makers’ best intentions, it is possible that a decision be challenged simply because other members interpret a policy or procedure differently.
Well-written policies
Full transcript