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Migrants

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on 25 September 2013

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Transcript of Migrants

Migrants
The Poem and Bruce Dawe's releveant Biographical info..
Analysis of the Poem
Migrants
In the fourth week the sea dropped clear away and they were there…
At first the people’s slurred indifference surprised them (was there a word for love in this wry tongue, or did they say all things with similar lack of emphasis?)
But still the skies stayed friendly, even if
They found themselves being shouted at like deaf
-Mutes whom one naturally hates the more of this

But that too, passed. Their children now less often
Came red-eyed home from school.

Dour neighbours bent
Slowly like hazel twigs towards that sound,
Guttural, labial, but beginning to soften,
In which both earth and water were being blent
As it pushed up in the rich well from underground

General Information
Poetic Form
Sonnet
How is the form applied
At first the people’s slurred indifference surprised them (was there a word for live in this wry tongue, or did they say all things with similar lack of emphasis?)
But still the skies stayed friendly, even if
They found themselves being shouted at like deaf
-Mutes whom one naturally hates the more of this

But that too, passed. Their children now less often


Themes explored
Change
Voice of the poem
Tone of the poem
Atmosphere created
Mood evoked
Sound imagery
Bruce Dawe
Sometimes Gladness..
Migrants
1969
Publishing Year
"It is not in the stars to hold our destiny but in ourselves."

14 lines
4 Quatrains
Dour neighbours bent
Slowly like hazel twigs towards that sound,
Guttural, labial, but beginning to soften,
In which both earth and water were being blent
As it pushed up in the rich well from underground

Conclusion
sums-up
Iambic pentameter
Features of Sonnet
Aftermaths of Wars
Discrimination
“Guttural, labial, but begging to soften. In which both earth and water were being blent”
“their children now less often came red-eyed home from school”
In the fourth week the sea dropped clear away and they were there…
3rd Person
they
were
....ed
that
Indifferent
compassionate
“Mutes whom one naturally hated the more for this”
“ Dour neighbours bent slowly like hazel twigs towards that sound,”
Optimistic and hopeful
Emotional-sympathetic
“but still the skies stayed”




“In which both earth and water were being blent”

s........s
Alliteration
b.......b
w........w
Sight Imagery
“But still the skies stayed friendly”
“They found themselves being shouted at like deaf”
“Their children now less often came red-eyed home from school”
A good poem indeed....
Sometimes gladness
A Sonnet
everyone is equal
No specific rhyming pattern
The discrimination the migrants faced
the Wry tongue
personification
melancholic
and
gloomy
Addressed to an audience

“Was there a word for love in this wry tongue, or did they say all things with similar lack of emphasis?”
sympathetic/compassionate
serious
“But that too, passes. Their children now less often came red-eyed home from school”
”At first people’s slurred Indifference surprised them”
heartened
dejected mood
Free verse
no specific order
no rhyming scheme
A-B-A-B|..
Unpacking Themes!!
=
Bruce Dawe
Full transcript