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Twenty Five - Stories from Australia's First Parliament

Storyboard approval
by

Nicola Forbes

on 28 February 2013

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Transcript of Twenty Five - Stories from Australia's First Parliament

Storyboard Approval Rare book - Report upon the progress made in roads and in the construction of public works in New South Wales, from the year 1827 to June 1855:[manuscript], Mitchell, Thomas Livingston, Sir The Last Duel Photograph album, Photographs of Federation of Australia 1901 One People, One Destiny Menu - Menu For Banquet for Members of National Federation Convention, 2 March 1891 Counting the People Settlers Muster Book 1800 Rare book, Voyage de La Perouse autour de la monde, La Perouse, Jean-Francoise de Galaup What News of La Perouse? Petition - Mr Weaver - enforcement of present liquor law A Reel Petition Emigration Posters Coming to New South Wales Sketch of a proposed mace in the traditional style Symbol of Authority Sketch of a proposed mace in the modern style Final story panel to conclude exhibition with story of NSW Parliament in 2012 Moving Forward Artwork, Founding of Australia, Algernon Talmage Founding of Australia Artwork - Major Frederick Goulburn, Augustus Earle Friend of Australia Artwork, Miss Millicent P S Vaughan, Jerrold Nathan Pulse of Victory Artwork, Sir Henry Parkes, Tom Roberts Father of Federation Photograph album - Opening of New South Wales Parliament by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II A Devoted People Record Album - H.M, Queen Elizabeth II - Opening of New South Wales Parliament - Australian Broadcasting Commission Projection of Macquarie Visions images by AVICCO and David Clare Photograph Visions from the Past Invitation - Official Opening of the Sydney Harbour Bridge - Honourable T Waddell MC and Mrs Waddell Crossing the Harbour Twice Object - Scissors used to cut the ribbon, southern approach Object - Ribbon - Official Opening of Sydney Harbour Tunnel Dressed Mannequin in jabot, jacket, cuffs, shirt Sartorial Flair Buka Basket The Pacific Bowl - kerosine wood inlaid with mother of pearl Figurine - nguzu nguzu - grey Figurine - nguzu nguzu - black Sustainable Collections Management for NSW Parliament The Flow Down Effect Understanding the Significance Tools Sustainable Collections Moving Forward Legislative and Policy Positon Case Study Painting, Oil on Canvas, Framed, Founding of Australia, Algernon Talmage Founding of Australia Speaking a Common Language What is Significance? Photograph Album - Opening of the New South Wales Parliament by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II A Devoted People Record Album - H.M. Queen Elizabeth II - Opening of New South Wales Parliament - Australian Broadcasting Commission Case Study Case Study What is movable cultural heritage? Buka Basket Pacific Connections Bowl - kerosine wood inlaid with mother of pearl Figurine - Nguzu Nguzu What would it look like? Settlers Muster Book 1800 The Muster Book A tool which will help us:
Define our collection
Manage in a sustainable way
Gain stakeholder agreement
Create Collections policy for everyday duties
Finding synergy between three domains
Agreed definition for financial stocktake purposes What are we looking for? Case Study Coat of Arms of New South Wales Newly Risen, How Brightly You Shine Proposals for New Parliament House, Architects Sketch of Proposal 1896 Grand Designs Menu - Luncheon, in honour of His Royal Highness The Duke of Gloucester, Parliament House A Meal Fit for A King Knife, fork, dessert spoon, wine glass, dinner plate, soup bowl (dinner service purchased 1949 for Royal Visit 1953) But How Would We Use It? Reel to Reel Recorder Duty to Report Manual "The Caligraph, shorthand notebook, draft Hansard Elector's Right Certificates Right to Vote Report with maps of Electoral Districts 1893 Bust on Pedestal, W C Wentworth, Achille Simonetti A New Britannia But First...
Defining "The Collection" Painting, Oil on Canvas, Framed, Sir Henry Parkes, Tom Roberts Father of Federation The Last Duel Story Sir Thomas Mitchell, the author of this beautiful book, was many things. He was a soldier in the wars against Napoleon. In Australia, he was an explorer who led four expeditions up country. From 1827 to 1855 Mitchell was the Surveyor General for New South Wales, which means that he planned many of the roads we still use today. This book is a record of that work.

Restless by nature and quick to take offence, Mitchell's other claim to fame is that he fought the last duel in Australia. This was against no other than Stuart Donaldson, who in 1856 was to become the first Premier of New South Wales. Like a lot of arguments, the duel was over nothing much. Words were said; apologies demanded; friends got involved; and somehow things went from bad to worse. The duel was fought on 27 September 1851, at half-past four on a Saturday afternoon. The Sydney Morning Herald wrote that both Mitchell and Donaldson fired three shots, one passing through "Mr Donaldson's hat", another "within an inch" of Mitchell's throat.

A close call for the future Premier! For Mitchell, too, a man who said he spent all his life "between extremes". Footprints in the Future Story Think of the building you are in, New South Wales Parliament House, as a time capsule, not only of time past and present, but also of the future. In amongst the history, the portraits of Premiers past, there are present developments that have important implications for future years. In particular, the Parliament is very much aware of the need to use and conserve our natural resources in a way that contributes to a sustainable future.
Seeking to apply innovative solutions to today's environmental concerns, since 2008 a project has been in place to improve solar, water and energy consumption at Parliament House. Called the "Parliament House Sustainability Program", the project has to date included the installation of 162 solar panels, a recycled water system, and energy saving lighting and electricity systems.
So far, we have saved 8 million litres of water, 72 tonnes of CO2 and prevented around 220 cubic meters of landfill per year. Each year we have also generated an average of 30,000 kilowatts of power and harvested around 7,000 litres of rain water.
Look on them as steps towards making Parliament House's future environmental footprint as invisible as it can be. The very opposite of the footprint it will make in the State's political future. What is Movable Cultural Heritage? Movable Cultural Heritage is:

A term used to define any natural of manufactured object or collection of heritage significance. It does not include archaeological relics found underwater or underground. Most commonly it refers to artworks, rare books, archives, objects, furniture, clothes, fossils and botanical specimens, transport items, machinery.

Movable cultural heritage which is an integral part of the significance of heritage places is particularly important and should where possible, remain in situ.

Because movable cultural heritage is portable, it is easily sold, relocated or thrown away during changes of ownership, fashion and use. For this reason, movable cultural heritage is vulnerable to loss, damage, theft and dispersal, often before its heritage significance is appreciated. Statement of Significance includes Significance Assessment and broad stakeholder consultation. This is the high level publicly available statement.
Collection Management Policy This is an internal document based on the Statement of Significance which provides guidance on the day to day management of collection. It sets out guidelines to assist staff when making decisions on collection issues such as transportation, conservation, insurance, deaccession, acquisition and loans.
Procedures or Working Instructions These may be different for Archives, Library or Facilities and be based on the methodology used by the different disciplines in the day to day management of the Collection. Movable Cultural Heritage is:

A term used by NSW Heritage Office.
"A term used to define any natural of manufactured object or collection of heritage significance. It does not include archaeological relics found underwater or underground. Most commonly it refers to artworks, images, rare books, archives, objects, furniture, clothes, fossils and botanical specimens, transport items, machinery.

Movable cultural heritage which is an integral part of the significance of heritage places is particularly important and where possible, should remain in situ.

Because movable cultural heritage is portable, it is easily sold, relocated or thrown away during changes of ownership, fashion and use. For this reason, movable cultural heritage is vulnerable to loss, damage, theft and dispersal, often before its heritage significance is appreciated." Significance is:
the values and meanings that items and collections have for people and communities. It is the historic, artistic, scientific and social or spiritual values that items have for past present and future generations. Significance is a concept - a way of deciding value.
A Significance Assessment is the process of researching and understanding the significance of a Collection.
A Statement of Significance is a summary of how and why a Collection is significant. We would use the Significance process:

for policy and strategic planning;
to understand the pattern and context of why Parliament collects and what it collects;
to reflect on strengths and weaknesses;
to identify significant themes;
to set collecting directions for the future;
to identify priority items for conservation and/or imaging;
to identify priority items for disaster preparedness;
to develop collecting strategies;
to provide information to feed into public programs. Each of the four collecting domains - libraries, galleries, archives and museums has it's own policies, procedures and methodologies. Significance has been designed to work with these to add value. In a collection environment that is increasingly becoming connected and intertwined, particularly with online access, users and management increasingly want one strategic direction or statement not a detailed description of different practices. What is a Sustainable Collection? Phil, Nicola and Annette form Collection Working Group to workshop an approach to a Significance Assessment for the Collection; What is Our Collection? Assets
(antiques,
artworks,
artefacts) Records and Archives Library Material The Collection Two mace designs, modern and traditional by Garrard & Company, London, 1974 Map of the Nineteen Counties, Surveyor-General of New South Wales, Mitchell, Sir Thomas, 1834 Moving Forward Phil, Annette and Nicola form working part to look at concept of significance and how it can be used in NSW Parliamentary context;
Phil and Nicola continue to work on assets policy with Jan Legislative Assembly Tabled Paper – Petition - Mr Weaver – Enforcement of present liquor law
Legislative Assembly of New South Wales, 1941 Julian Ashton, Sir Henry Parkes, 1913
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