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Copy of No Fear, Shakespeare!

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by

Gunilla Hanson

on 30 January 2013

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Transcript of Copy of No Fear, Shakespeare!

NO FEAR, SHAKESPEARE! I KNOW
JUST WHAT
YOU'RE
THINKING... it's boring! it's too hard
to understand! and what's it got to
do with me today? let's take Romeo & Juliet for example it was written around
the 16th century, performed in the
Elizabethan Era and is 3093
lines long! pretty old &
boring stuff RIGHT? perhaps you are
familiar with these
two films? She's the Man, 2006 10 Things I Hate About
You, 1999 BOTH of these films are based around plays that Shakespeare wrote; SHE'S THE TWELFTH NIGHT TAMING OF THE SHREW TRUTH IS... EVEN THOUGH Shakespeare lived hundreds of years ago... the plays he wrote are still relevant TODAY! 10 THINGS ABOUT YOU I HATE MAN DID YOU KNOW THAT ? so if we can enjoy movies like She's the Man & 10 Things I Hate About You... THEN WHY CAN'T WE THE SHAKESPEARE VERSIONS ? ENJOY ASWELL the characters are SIMILAR to us today with SIMILAR struggles & complications and themes that are FAMILIAR to modern teenagers!! FOR EXAMPLE... LOVE VIOLENCE "A thousand times the worse to want thy light. Love goes toward love as schoolboys from their books, But love from love, toward school with heavy looks."
- Romeo WAIT! WHAT
IS ROMEO EVEN
TALKING ABOUT? to rephrase it, Romeo is basically trying to say; Leaving Juliet is a thousand times worse than being with Juliet. A lover goes toward his beloved as enthusiastically as a schoolboy leaving his books, but when he leaves his girlfriend, he feels as miserable as the schoolboy on his way to school. MAKE MORE SENSE? SO ROMEO & JULIET is the most FAMOUS LOVE
STORY IN
THE
ENGLISH
LITERATURE
HISTORY and this is because
one of the main FOCUSES in the play is ROMANTIC L O V E especially the intense passion that SPRINGS at first sight between ROMEO & JULIET
how cute, right? AWW! NOT ALL BUT THAT'S the theme of love is also very prominent in Romeo & Juliet because for both characters, it begins to over ride all other values, such as; FRIENDSHIP Romeo abandons Benvolio & Mercutio after the party at Capulet Mansion, in order to see Juliet. FAMILY Juliet states that if Romeo wishes to marry her, she will forfeit her last name and lifestyle as a Capulet. AUTHORITY Romeo returns to Verona after being banished, for Juliet's sake. so...as you can see Romeo & Juliet's love for each other drives them to defy their entire social world which is why the play is the most well-known love story in the English literature history. HOWEVER, this play is also one of the most well-known TRAGEDIES of all time! WHICH LEADS TO OUR NEXT THEME OF ... this type of love did not only exist when Shakespeare was writing his plays... as a matter of fact, it is still happening in modern day society! let's take Princess Catherine Middleton for example... Princess Catherine had to give up her lifestyle with her family so that she could be with her BELOVED but, we'll get back to that later... LOVE AS A CAUSE OF VIOLENCE "What, ho! You men, you beasts,That quench the fire of your pernicious rageWith purple fountains issuing from your veins,On pain of torture, from those bloody handsThrow your mistempered weapons to the ground,And hear the sentence of your movèd prince." - Prince Escalus WHICH IS JUST A FANCY
WAY OF SAYING... Hey! You there! You men, you beasts, who satisfy their anger with fountains of each others' blood! I’ll have you tortured if you don’t put down your swords and listen to your outraged police man. just for a quick recap; ROMEO & is a very well- known TRAGEDY due to the
family feud between
the... CAPULETS vs. MONTAGUES JULIET although the reasoning behind the family feud is never actually stated in the play it is a major focus within. VIOLENCE OCCURS
THROUGHOUT THE ENTIRE play between the CAPULETS & MONTAGUES even from the very beginning of the play (in the prologue) and the opening scene we are informed that occurs throughout of the violence the play between the two families. "two households, both alike in dignity In fair Verona, where we lay our scene, From ancient grudge break to new mutiny, Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean" lord CAPULET & lord MONTAGUE ARE SO BLINDED by their ancient grudge that they fail to see the negative impact it has on their families FOR EXAMPLE; TYBALT (Juliet's cousin) When he sees Romeo at the Capulet mansion, he wishes to fight him, even against the death penalty enforced by Prince Escalus. ROMEO After Tybalt slays Mercutio (Romeo's best friend), he is so filled with anger that he kills Tybalt, resulting in Romeo being exiled from Verona. JULIET When Romeo is exiled from Verona due to extreme violence, Juliet is forced to marry Paris. In order to prevent this from happening, Juliet fakes her own death. ...So clearly, violence is a major part of Romeo & Juliet. Maybe even more so than the theme of love? Perhaps we can relate this to the Sydney shootings that have occurred recently? In 2011, there were close to 100
shooting incidents in Sydney, NSW. In 2012, there have been
several more of these shootings. These shootings are often without reasoning and have harmed innocent victims. The violence and onoging feud between the Capulets and Montagues is not just found in Shakespeare's plays, however is clearly still an occurrence in modern day society. So which theme is more evident in Romeo & Juliet? L O V E OR H A T E R O M A N C E OR V I O E L N C E ? well...let's take a
look at another THEME "These violent delights have violent ends And in their triumph, die like fire and powder." - Friar Lawrence Which
means... These sudden joys have sudden endings and will burn up like fire and gun powder. This is quoted by FRIAR LAWRENCE when he is wedding ROMEO & JULIET and he is trying to point out..... the DANGERS of LOVE and LUST and if you RUSH into LOVE you are likely to have an UNHAPPY ending and the Friar happened to be correct on this occasion... the connection between HATE VIOLENCE DEATH is easy to see however, the connection between LOVE VIOLENCE isn't as easy to see THE LOVE BETWEEN ROMEO JULIET ACTUALLY IS THE CAUSE OF MAJORITY OF THE VIOLENCE IN THE PLAY FOR EXAMPLE; SIMULTANEOUS LOVE & HATE At the same time as Tybalt noticing Romeo at the Capulet Mansion and wanting to fight him for tresspassing, Romeo catches sight of Juliet and falls for her in an instant. THOUGHTS OF SUICIDE Romeo experiences these thoughts when he has been exiled from Verona, the place where Juliet is.
Juliet experiences these thoughts when she is forced to marry Paris. RISK IN FAKING DEATH Juliet will go to whatever lengths she believes are necessary to prevent her marriage to Paris. She takes the risk of faking her own death by consuming a potion, because her love for Romeo is so strong that she would rather die than marry someone who was not him. the love that romeo & juliet had for each other was the cause of the most V I O L E N T & T R A G I C ENDING Bet you never thought of it that way BEFORE? and incase you didn't know how the ending unfolds... I highly recommend
you read... the most well-known tragic love story in the english literature history ROMEO & JULIET (Romeo and Juliet, Act 2, Sc. 2, 7) (Romeo and Juliet, Act 1, Sc. 1, 6) (Romeo and Juliet, Prologue) (Romeo and Juliet, Act 2, Sc.6, 1) "for never was a story of more woe
than this of Juliet and her Romeo." (Romeo and Juliet, Act 5, Sc. 3, 14)
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