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The Tyger and The Lamb: A poetry compare and contrast

Poems : William Blake Prezi: Heather Whitaker
by

Heather Whitaker

on 10 January 2013

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Transcript of The Tyger and The Lamb: A poetry compare and contrast

The Poems The Thesis Contrast: The Tyger Contrast: The Lamb Results The Comparison The Two Poems are alike because the both dabble with a bit of rhyme and that they both deal with the concept of creation and Identity.

The Speaker in the Tyger wonders how such a fearsome beast was created by the same Creator who made the Lamb.

The Speaker in the Lamb though also pondering is more concerned with the lambs discovery. Tyger by William Blake In the Poems The Tyger and The Lamb by William Blake we have a speaker who questions the creation of the two very different animals. Comparing one to God and the other confused that the same higher being could have actually created it. The Tyger and The Lamb: A Poetry Contrastparison This poem overall has a more dark feel to it. Leaving you intimidated by the creature. Making a Tiger out to be more of devil than an animal.

The rhyme in the poem is almost reminiscent to Lewis Carroll's Jabberwocky in the sense that is gives the poem an over all more eerie feel. This Poem on the other hand has an overall more story book and jovial feeling. Like a children's song.

The feeling this poem gives you kind of make you wanna giggle and eat cotton candy or something. Its fluffy. Like a Lambs Wool. Get it? Youve got two poems by the same Dead guy, who wrote them as companion pieces. They both deal with the same concept of creation and self identity (which is shown through the analysis of the differences between the two animals though they are "supposedly" created by the same God.) Both are similar in that respect but they are relayed to the reader in completely different ways. Poems: William Blake
Prezi: Whitaker Lamb by William Blake Tyger Tyger, burning bright,
In the forests of the night;
What immortal hand or eye,
Could frame thy fearful symmetry?

In what distant deeps or skies.
Burnt the fire of thine eyes?
On what wings dare he aspire?
What the hand, dare seize the fire?

And what shoulder, & what art,
Could twist the sinews of thy heart?
And when thy heart began to beat,
What dread hand? & what dread feet?

What the hammer? what the chain,
In what furnace was thy brain?
What the anvil? what dread grasp,
Dare its deadly terrors clasp!

When the stars threw down their spears
And water'd heaven with their tears:
Did he smile his work to see?
Did he who made the Lamb make thee?

Tyger Tyger burning bright,
In the forests of the night:
What immortal hand or eye,
Dare frame thy fearful symmetry? Little Lamb who made thee Dost thou know who made thee
Gave thee life & bid thee feed.
By the stream & o'er the mead;
Gave thee clothing of delight,
Softest clothing wooly bright;
Gave thee such a tender voice,
Making all the vales rejoice!
Little Lamb who made thee
Dost thou know who made thee
Little Lamb I'll tell thee,
Little Lamb I'll tell thee!
He is called by thy name,
For he calls himself a Lamb:
He is meek & he is mild,
He became a little child:
I a child & thou a lamb,
We are called by his name.
Little Lamb God bless thee.
Little Lamb God bless thee.
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