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Copy of Bird Beak

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by

silas Oshea

on 2 October 2012

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Transcript of Copy of Bird Beak

Roseate Spoonbill
"Platalea ajaja" Description Habitat By Nick and Silas (cc) photo by theaucitron on Flickr (cc) photo by theaucitron on Flickr Physical description
Roseate Spoonbills are medium sized wading birds. They are 71 to 86 cm long with a wingspan of 120 to 130 cm. As the name suggests, Roseate Spoonbills body's are rose colored but their heads and beak are bare and olive grey. Beak description
The Roseate Spoonbill's beak is spoon shaped and small relative to its body. It has no feathers on it and is grey. The inside of the beak is filled with nerves. Diet
The Roseate Spoonbill eats mostly small fish such as minnows and killifish. They also eat small shrimp, mollusks and aquatic bugs. Problem Once upon a time, there was a Roseate Spoonbill called Rosy. One day she was looking for her favourite fish in a stream when she noticed the glint of sunlight off of something shiny. Thinking it was a minnow, she bent down and snapped her beak around it. Unfortunetly, it was not a minnow but a tangle of barbed wire that a human had dumped there. As she tried to get free, her beak snapped off. Adaptations Physical adaptations
Beak
Feeding habits
Advertising
Legs Behavioural adaptations
Plumage
Courtship displays
Groups
Mates only for babies World Distribution The Roseate Spoonbill lives in marshes and mangroves, ranging from Florida and the Caribbean to the bottom of South America Algea Small fish Roseate Spoonbill coyote Coyote Body Roseate Spoonbill Small Fish Coyote Algea Roseate Spoonbill Bibliography http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roseate_Spoonbill
www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Roseate__Spoonbill/id
(library book) World animals # 14 birds, Waterbirds
http://rosemondgiffordzoo.org
http://www.honoluluzoo.org/roseate_spoonbill.htm Group Member Member Member (cc) photo by theaucitron on Flickr (cc) photo by theaucitron on Flickr copy paste branches if you need more.... Experiment Purpose:
To determine if a first class lever can pick up a range of small items submerged in water in 30 seconds. Hypothesis:
We think that if we submerge a range of small objects, then our first class lever will pick up at least ten, because the load shape is adapted to pick up small items in water. Results:
Test one: 14
Test two: 10
Test three: 11
Test four: 10
Test five: 11
Average: 11.2 Procedure:
1. Empty sand into basin.
2. Pour water into basin until it is at least halfull.
3. Drop animals into water and stir around.
4. Using bird beak, try to pick up as many objects as you can in thirty seconds.
5. Record data. 6. Put all objects taken out back in water.
7.Repeat steps 5 and 6 four more times and find average.
8. Use paper towel to clean up any water that has spilled. Materials needed:
sand
basin of some sort ( 5.3 cm by 4.5 cm by 9.5 cm)
water
beads
small gummy animals
paper towel
stop watch
bird beak ( model of a roseate spoonbills beak ) Conclusion: In our hypothesis, we stated that if we submerge a range of small objects, then our first class lever will pick up at least ten, because the load shape is adapted to pick up small items in water.
Our experiment's results are as follows:
Test one: 14
Test two: 10
Test three: 11
Test four: 10
Test five: 11
Average: 11.2
Because our average amount of objects picked up exceeds our expected number of objects picked up, we are forced to accept our hypothsis. water bugs small fish ( minnows and killifish ) small crustaceans water plants raccoons Result Test 1 Test 2 Test 3 Test 4 Test 5 14 10 11 10 11 11.2 Average Test 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 The relationship between the amount of submerged items picked up in thirty second to the trial. Number of submerged items picked up Trial 1 x y 2 3 4 5 average variables tested
Independent: Number of submerged items picked up
Dependent: Trial Modifications Problems: Modifications: Did it help? Our first fulcrum design didn't allow the beak to open or close. Changed the fulcrum design Yes Getting the beak to fit in the "body" Redesigned the size of the "body" Yes The plaster of paris wasn't working as well as it should have Added more water to the mixture Yes We accidently drilled right through Rosy's head when putting the eyes in place Filled in the hole using a mixture of paper, glue and primer Yes Problem Modification Did it help? http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Roseate_Spoonbill/sounds
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