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Respiration Rates of Plants vs. Animals

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Shruti G

on 26 November 2013

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Transcript of Respiration Rates of Plants vs. Animals

Respiration Rates of Plants vs. Animals
Question
What is the effect of type of organism on rate of respiration?
Hypothesis
If the organism is larger and more complex (i.e. a worm), the rate of respiration of higher, because the organism requires more energy for growth, mobility, and body function. If the organism is smaller and stationary (i.e. germinating peas), the rate of respiration is lower, because the organisms require less energy, as they are stationary and have less complex body functions. We also hypothesize that the glass beads have the lowest rate of respiration because the are not living and cannot respire.

by: Shruti Goli, Pranathi Gutala, Manasa Vemuri, Sahana Asokan
Procedure (Part 2)
e. Place the germinating seeds in 2 of the vials, glass beads in 2 of the vials, and the worms in the last 2 vials. Place the stoppers with the pipettes attached onto the vials.

f. Fill the water bath with room temperature water (Ours was measured at 21.0 C).
g. Make a sling of masking tape attached to either side of the water baths. Place the vials in the water bath with the pipettes held out of the water by the tape sling. Wait 7 minutes for the vials to calibrate.

h. After 7 minutes, squeeze a few drops of food coloring into the tip of the pipettes to be able to read the oxygen level when it is immersed
i. Immerse the vials completely in the water and allow it to calibrate for another 3 minutes before taking the readings.
j. After 3 minutes, start reading the oxygen levels in mL on the pipet for every 5 minutes until 20 minutes.
Discussion Part 1
In this lab, we found that respiration in animals (worms) occurred at a faster rate than respiration in plants (germinating seeds). In the first worm, the amount of consumed oxygen increased from from 1.7 mL to 3.65 mL In the second worm the amount of consumed oxygen increased from 2.9 mL to 5.0 mL. In the first germinating seeds vial, the amount of oxygen consumed went from .8 mL to 2.3 mL. In the second germinating seeds vial, the amount of oxygen consumed went from .7 mL to 2.1 mL. In the first glass beads vial, the amount of oxygen remained constant of 1.2 mL and the second glass beads vial had a constant oxygen consumption of 1.1 mL. We then used a linear regression to calculate the average slope to determine the rate of respiration. The respiration rate for the first worm vial was 1.5626 + .1049x, where x was time. The respiration rate for the second worm vial was 2.6889 + .1135x, where x was time. The respiration rate for the first seed vial was .7161 + .0781x, where x was time. The respiration rate for the second seed vial was .6809 + .0796x, where x was time. The glass beads did not have a slope because the oxygen consumption did not change. The respiration rate of the first glass bead vial was 1.2, where x was time. The respiration rate for the second glass bead vial was 1.1, where x was time. We found that the slopes of the equations for the worms were about 0.03 mL to 0.04 mL greater than the slopes for the equations of the germinating peas.

Discussion Part 2
This means that the rate of respiration for the worms was greater than the rate of respiration for the plants. It also means that the rates of both the worms and the plants were significantly higher than the rate of respiration of the glass beads. All these results supported our hypothesis that the worm respiration would be faster than the peas respiration. The reason why the rate of respiration for the worms was greater is that worms are more complex and mobile organisms that require much more energy than do plants. As plants are stationary and have much simpler systems, they do not need to respire as much in order to produce energy. Though we did not find any unusual data, a source of error could have been that the masses of the worms and the peas were not exactly equal, and this could have caused the peas to have lower respiration rates. Another source of error is that the vials may have gently shifted during the experiment, causing the respirometer to read incorrectly. To answer our original question, worms respired at a higher rate than the peas, and larger, more complex organisms respire at a higher rate than simpler, smaller organisms. Also, the glass beads did not respire at all because they are non-living. If we were to do any future investigation, we would would experiment with larger animals or different plants.
Data Equations

Worm Vial 1 Equation:
y = 1.5626 + .1049x

Worm Vial 2 Equation:
y = 2.6889 + .1135x

Germinating Peas 1 Equation:
y = .7161 + .0781x

Germinating Peas 2 Equation:
y = .6809 + .0796x

Procedure (Part 3)
In this experiment the controls were the two vials with the glass beads. The independent variable was the type of organism, and the dependent variable was the rate of respiration.
Procedure (Part 1)
a. Procure a box of live earthworms and measure out 2 groups of equal mass of worms using a scale. Set the worms aside.
b. Using the same scale, measure out two groups of germinating peas of equal volume to the groups of worms. Set the peas aside. Using the same scale, measure out two groups of glass beads of equal volume as the control.
c. The worm groups were 7.56 grams and 7.82 grams, and the pea groups were 7.56 grams and 7.61 grams. The glass bead groups were 7.6 grams and 7.62 grams.
d. To assemble the respirometers, obtain 6 vials (2 trials for each) with stoppers. Place a small wad of cotton at the bottom of each of the vials. Saturate the cotton with 40 drops of 15% KOH. Make sure that the KOH does not touch the sides of the vial when saturating the cotton. Place another equally sized wad of cotton above the saturated cotton.


Data
Glass Beads 1 Equation:
y = 1.2

Glass Beads 2 Equation:
y = 1.1
Full transcript