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the Physics of Snowboarding

a slide show showing the history and physics of snowboarding
by

Joe Donnelly

on 9 April 2013

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Transcript of the Physics of Snowboarding

The board is floating on water during its entire run over snow, which is constantly subjected to what physicists call a "phase transition" of turning from ice crystals into water.
At the tail of the board a second phase change takes place as the abrupt end of friction returns the water to snow. This puts an incredible demand on the gliding wax applied to the board's underside which must smoothly facilitate the rapidly changing forms of H2O. The board and the snow Snowboarding is a sport that involves descending a slope that is covered with snow on a snowboard attached to a rider's feet using a special boot set onto a mounted binding.
The development of snowboarding was inspired by skateboarding, sledding, surfing and skiing.
It was developed in the U.S.A. in the 1960s to 1970s and became a Winter Olympic Sport in 1998 Snowboarding Thank you By Joe Donnelly The Physics of Snowboarding
Modern riders competitions
Deduction
Source list
video link
Ending slide
Outline “Current slide”
*Also pictures throughout * Outline Cover
Snowboarding
History of snowboarding
History of snowboarding
Jake Burton
Whinterstick
Phyics of a snowboard
physics of aerial tricks on a snowboard

video link
The board and the snow
The board and the snow II http://www.eweek.org/site/News/Features/snoboard.shtml
www.Youtube.com
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Who_are_the_Top_ten_snowboarders
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snowboarding
http://www.real-world-physics-problems.com/physics-of-snowboarding.html Sources Top Ten Riders Today Through layered combinations of: fiberglass, wood, epoxy, polyurethanes and engineering wonders such as Kevlar
Kevlar-created from the discovery of a polymade solvent in 1966 by a woman engineer, Stephanie Kwolek
snowboard manufacturers tune the flexibility of the board The composition of the snowboard The first snowboard http://youtube.com/watch?v=cgl9EyExcTc Any strong but thin piece of wood.
Small thin sheet of fiberglass
Paint (generally silk screening)
Two flat metal sheets
Liquid hardeners Components used in assembly of a snowboard As the nose hits the snow, it encounters frozen water particles, but the friction of the board causes an instant heating that turns the snow into water. The National Engineers Week Committee points out, an amazing piece of thermodynamics takes place when the board passes over the snow. The board and the snow Modern Riders Competitions Some of the larger snowboarding contests include: the Air & Style, the X-Trail Jam, Burton Global Open Series, Shakedown, and the X Games and the dew cup. In 1970, Milovich, an east coast surfer, had an idea while he was sliding around on cafeteria trays in the snow of upstate New York helping to contribute to the making of snowboards In the begining $15 bought a snurfers a board and about 1 million where sold in a little less than 10 years.
But the snurfer as a mass phenomenon disappeared quickly because they were to hard to control. Snowboarding history In 1975, they were mentioned in American magazines such as Newsweek and Playboy.
In 1980, the company went bankrupt.
Jake Burton, a 23-year-old student back then, was completely into snurfing and kept on improving: Foottraps for better control and fins for more stability Snowboarding is a sport that involves descending a slope that is covered with snow on a snowboard attached to a rider's feet using a special boot set onto a mounted binding.
The development of snowboarding was inspired by skateboarding, sledding, surfing and skiing.
It was developed in the U.S.A. in the 1960s to 1970s and became a Winter Olympic Sport in 1998 Snowboarding Started to develop snowboards following the example of the new short surf boards. He even used rudimentary steel edges.
He experimented with laminating glass and gravel on the board and also used nylon straps for better control.
His company "Winterstick" is to be considered the first snowboard company ever. Jake Burton Deduction Beyond its dependence on phyisics, even the pedigree of snowboarding is rooted in engineering.
The National Engineers Week Committee proudly points out that the first snowboard was made by an engineer.
In 1965, an industrial-gases engineer, Sherman Poppen of Muskegon, Michigan, saw his daughter attempting to stand up on her sled while sliding downhill.
Using dowels, Poppen screwed two child snow skis together and gave it to his daughter, who created a local rage for the new invention. A snowboarder typically gains speed by converting gravitational potential energy into kinetic energy of motion.
So the more a snowboarder descends down a hill, the faster he goes. The picture above show a snowboarder going down a mountain.
However, since the side of the mountain is very steep, the snowboarder must prevent himself from going too fast and losing control.
He does this by skidding his board on the snow, in a controlled zig-zag pattern (shown in the first picture). This creates frictional resistance with the snow and prevents his speed from reaching dangerously high levels. Physics of snowboarding Physics Of Snowboarding — Aerial Tricks

For some tricks, a snowboarder performs aerial acrobatics, spinning and twisting in the air.
The basic physics principle at work here is the conservation of angular momentum. The angular momentum of the snowboarder is determined at takeoff (from the ramp), and cannot be changed once the snowboarder is airborne.
So to make turns in the air the snowboarder must give himself initial rotation upon takeoff.
Once airborne, the snowboarder can alter his body shape in order to produce an impressive aerial display of tricks and twists for the crowd, during which his angular momentum remains constant.
When it comes to aerial tricks, the physics of snowboarding is similar to the physics of skateboarding.
The picture below shows a snowboarder performing a frontside 180. Physics Of Snowboarding — Pumping On A Half-Pipe

Pumping on a half-pipe is used by snowboarders to increase their vertical take-off speed when they exit the pipe. This enables them to reach greater height and perform more aerial tricks, while airborne. The principle is exactly the same as for skateboarders pumping on a half-pipe.

The figure below shows a snowboarder in the curved portion of the half-pipe.





The figure below shows a snowboarder after he has exited the half-pipe and is airborne.






The snowboarder is able to increase his speed on the half-pipe with his feet remaining firmly on the board. This begs the question, what is the physics of snowboarding taking place that enables the snowboarder to increase his speed on the half-pipe?
To increase his speed, the snowboarder crouches down in the straight part of the half-pipe. Then when he enters the curved portion of the half-pipe he lifts his body and arms up, which results in him exiting the pipe at greater speed than he would otherwise.
The basic snowboarding physics behind this phenomenon can be understood by applying the principle of angular impulse and momentum. Where:
wi is the initial angular velocity of the body (consisting of snowboarder plus board), at position (1)
wf is the final angular velocity of the body, at position (2), which is the point at which the snowboarder exits the half-pipeVi is the initial velocity of the center of mass G of the body, at position (1)
Vf is the final velocity of the center of mass G of the body, at position (2)ri is the initial distance from the center of rotation o to the body's center of mass G, at position (1)
rf is the final distance from the center of rotation o to the body's center of mass G, at position (2)
g is the acceleration due to gravity
N is the normal force acting on the snowboard, as shown
F is the friction force acting on the snowboard, as shown
It is assumed that the half-pipe is a perfect circle with center at o. #1 -Shaun White #2-Terje Haakonsen #3-Andreas Wiig #4- Travis Rice #5-Mason Aguirre #6-Ross Peterson #7-Tara Dakides #8-Craig Kelly #9-Danny Kass #10-Scott Stevens ( My Favorite Rider)(video link) In 1964 a young surf freak called Sherman Poppen built a surfboard for the snow
His first prototype was two kids' skis bolted together to create a long plastic plank that was about 1.20 meters long
His idea was put into production: Carried out together with a bowling-ball manufacturer, and the product was called the "snurfer" (snow-surfer) Composition of the board Top ten riders snowboarding fails *
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