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The Tyger

Text with connections and background info
by

Joel Agee

on 16 October 2013

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Transcript of The Tyger

The Tyger
from Songs of Experience
(1794)
by William Blake
Tyger
! Tyger! burning bright
In the forests of the night,
What immortal hand or eye
Could
frame

thy
fearful
symmetry
?

In what distant deeps or skies
Burnt the fire of
thine
eyes?
On what wings dare he aspire?
What the hand dare seize the fire?

And what shoulder, and what
art
?
Could twist the
sinews
of thy heart?
And when thy heart began to beat,
What dread hand? and what dread feet?

What the hammer? what the chain?
In what furnace was thy brain?
What the anvil? what dread grasp
Dare its deadly terrors clasp?

When the stars threw down their spears,
And watered heaven with their tears,
Did he smile his work to see?
Did he who made the
Lamb
make thee?

Tyger! Tyger! burning bright
In the forests of the night,
What immortal hand or eye
Dare frame thy fearful symmetry?

William Blake
is another one of those artists/poets
that people didn't really catch on to until
after he had died. But when people looked
back on all he had written and painted, they
agreed: this guy changed everything.
(1757-1827)
Songs of Innocence and Experience
is considered one of Blake's most important
works. It's a collection of poems with matching
illustrations split into two halves:
Songs of Innocence
explores life from the point of view of childhood innocence and wonder, the light side of life.
Songs of Experience
explores the same topics as the Songs of Innocence, only this round from the point of view of the harsher realities understood by people who have experienced more of the world, life's darker side.
The Lamb
The two collections coordinate:
Lighter side
Darker side
The Tyger
Question: Animal, who made you?
Songs of Experience
Songs of Innocence
old English spelling for Tiger
imagine; build
your
design
your
tendons
check out the bubble on the right side of the poem
in this case: method or art form
Full transcript