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Bacterial Radar

Mitchell shepherd

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Transcript of Bacterial Radar

Sensitivity
A genetic mutation can occur more easily than you might think. There are so many segments just changing one could be catastrophic. However most of the time these mutations are harmless. These are known as silent mutations. These can be helpful or neutral, as genetic mutations are completely random. Hence the word mutation instead of alteration.
Microorganisms
Microorganisms are everywhere; in us, on us, around us. There's no avoiding them. They can be helpful or hurtful or somewhere in between! There are three main types of microorganisms: protists, bacteria, and viruses.
Cancer
How Mutation Helps
Besides the fact that genetic mutation can be very hurtful, it is how all microorganisms come to be. Even though mutation can be bad it is also a base of micro life! New microorganisms good or bad always come out of genetic mutation. Indeed mutation is a good thing. Without mutation humans could never exist! Humans are full of microorganisms which all mutated to help us survive, and some mutated to hurt us!
Fun Facts
* When you flush a toilet the aerosol droplets, which include microorganisms go up to 20 feet.
*Eye and hair color are counted as mutations.
*Some viruses can't directly hurt you but they can indirectly hurt you. They do this by attacking bacteria that help you survive.
*You are "infected" with many viruses but most can't hurt you.
*The common cold mutates every year to survive.
Don't get caught with a bacteria:
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Bacterial Radar
Where Diseases Come From
A virus can't reproduce on its own so it needs help form another cell. The virus lands on the cell and either injects its DNA into the cell or it tricks the cell into welcoming the virus's DNA inside.
Next, once inside the cell, the virus DNA merges with the cell DNA. Then the cell does its job. Copies of the DNA get weaved through things just like 3D printers, copying the cell DNA and the virus DNA. Then the small virus copies grow and eventually break out of the cell
The sickle blood cell is an excellent example of genetic mutation. Scientists say that one kind of sickle blood cell strand can be beneficial while the other can be deadly.
The protists are always bad. They are mostly referred to parasitic worms; such as "Loaloa" or the dreaded "Tapeworm". Some other parasites, like the "Round Worm", are big enough for the human eye to see thus making them even more scary.
Sometimes the DNA gets coped wrong, This is when the 3D printers make a mistake. This is called a genetic mutation.
The Deadly Mutation
Cancer is a genetic mutation . It is caused when certain cells reproduce incorrectly. Then the cancer cells reproduce making it constantly grow out of control. In the DNA strand you can see the damaged segment, this is essentially what happens when cancer strikes.
Cancer is especially hard to cure because even though all cancers are cells growing out of control each cancer is completely different mutation.
Most of the time silent mutations aren't even detected because they aren't ever hurtful making them harder to notice.
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