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White Fang by Jack London

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by

John Liddy

on 25 September 2013

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Transcript of White Fang by Jack London

Wind

This house has been far out at sea all night,
The woods crashing through darkness, the booming hills,
Winds stampeding the fields under the window
Floundering black astride and blinding wet

Till day rose; then under an orange sky
The hills had new places, and wind wielded
Blade-light, luminous black and emerald,
Flexing like the lens of a mad eye.

At noon I scaled along the house-side as far as
The coal-house door. Once I looked up -
Through the brunt wind that dented the balls of my eyes
The tent of the hills drummed and strained its guyrope,

The fields quivering, the skyline a grimace,
At any second to bang and vanish with a flap;
The wind flung a magpie away and a black-
Back gull bent like an iron bar slowly. The house

Rang like some fine green goblet in the note
That any second would shatter it. Now deep
In chairs, in front of the great fire, we grip
Our hearts and cannot entertain book, thought,

Or each other. We watch the fire blazing,
And feel the roots of the house move, but sit on,
Seeing the window tremble to come in,
Hearing the stones cry out under the horizons.

Ted Hughes
First Encounter
First encounter
White Fang by Jack London
Writing creatively: a look at our writing circle
Alliteration: the use of the same consonant or sound group.
The first word of the story
Dark
sets the tone and mood. It links with
fading light
and
desolation.
The word
movement
is a very important word in the story.
darkness
a cruel use of the word
laughter
The Writing Circle

November/December 2012
Revised Sept. 2013

(Six sessions of fifteen minutes)


WORKING WITH PROSE

First encounter

1. Focus on opening sentence of story and point out its eye-catching qualities, i.e. choice of words, use of dramatic tone and detailed description.
2. Read through the first paragraph for other redeeming qualities, i.e. introduction of character(s), additional description, particular words that develop our perception of the character or place.
3. Draw students’ attention to the possible reasons the writer has for the use of description for people and place, i.e. creating atmosphere, necessary for the story.
4. Finish reading the first paragraph and point out how it closes. Is it a complete paragraph, i.e. does it adhere to its thesis statement in the topic sentence. Explain what this means.
5. Give students a copy of the next 4/5 paragraphs and get them to write notes using the points made in 1,2, 3 and 4 above. Arrange next session and remind them to bring their notes.

Second encounter

1. Open discussion about notes students took on the paragraphs.
2. Comment on their notes and add where necessary.
3. Finish the story, taking turns to read.
4. Discuss remaining paragraphs of the story.
5. Did the story achieve its purpose, what the writer wanted to tell?
WORKING WITH POEMS

First encounter

1. Examine the workings of a poem for its choice of words, sounds and emotions. What function does rhyme serve? Does it make the poem easier to read or to remember? Is there any use of image? simile? metaphor? Explain these poetic devices. Use of ‘like’, ‘as’.
2. Is each stanza complete? Is anything being described? What words are used for this description?
3. Is there any relationship established between opening line and end line of poem?
4. There is a change in mood in the poem. Point out where this change takes place.
5. Give students a copy of another poem and get them to take notes as above on points 1,2 and 3 and bring those notes to second encounter.

Second encounter

1. Discuss their notes on the poem. Add to what is being said.
2. Show them more poems and lists of poems from various books and anthologies. What themes are being used for poems? What subject-matter?
3. Now they think about a subject for a poem they would like to write. Brainstorm this for next encounter and develop into notes or points for inclusion. Get them to research the subject.
4. They must bring their ideas to third encounter.

Third encounter

1. Get them to talk about their ideas and notes on their poems to each other. Prompt, encourage and suggest where necessary.
2. Get them to make a start on the poem, working alone.
3. Bring first draft to fourth encounter

Fourth encounter

1. Make copies of drafts. While students read over each other’s poems teacher looks over drafts, makes suggestions on how to improve vocabulary and highlight emotion, use of metaphor, simile, images.

Fifth encounter

1. Students work on final versions with face to face advice from teacher. Remind them of the points raised in previous encounters. Write out finished poem.

Sixth encounter

1. Hand in final poem .Get them to read their poem to each other.
Reunion and party for all members of the Writing Circle during World Book Week celebrations.
Tell members of the Writing Circle that a selection of the best work will be published in the YearBook.

John Liddy
Oct. 23, 2012/Sept. 10, 2013


WORKING WITH POEMS

First encounter

1. Examine the workings of a poem for its choice of words, sounds and emotions. What function does rhyme serve? Does it make the poem easier to read or to remember? Is there any use of image? simile? metaphor? Explain these poetic devices. Use of ‘like’, ‘as’.
2. Is each stanza complete? Is anything being described? What words are used for this description?
3. Is there any relationship established between opening line and end line of poem?
4. There is a change in mood in the poem. Point out where this change takes place.
5. Give students a copy of another poem and get them to take notes as above on points 1,2 and 3 and bring those notes to second encounter.

Second encounter

1. Discuss their notes on the poem. Add to what is being said.
2. Show them more poems and lists of poems from various books and anthologies. What themes are being used for poems? What subject-matter?
3. Now they think about a subject for a poem they would like to write. Brainstorm this for next encounter and develop into notes or points for inclusion. Get them to research the subject.
4. They must bring their ideas to third encounter.
Wind by Ted Hughes
Second Encounter
Thanks very much for your time and attention.
john.liddy@britishcouncil.es
Excerpt from White Fang by Jack London. Adventure Stories chosen by Clive King, Kingfisher.
WIND by Ted Hughes. Poets of the Century. Selected and edited by Barrie Wade. Nelson, 1989.
Full transcript