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Storytelling

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Cigdem Barac

on 22 July 2013

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Transcript of Storytelling

Why tell a story? - benefits of stories
Outline
Why tell stories? - benefits of stories

Choosing the right story - criteria

Classroom storytelling activities

How to tell a story - work phases with a story

Example - Dinosaurs by Michael Foreman

Problems

References

Classroom storytelling activities
1. Tell and re-tell

2. Tell the story from another perspective

3. Conduct interviews with well-known story characters.

4. Find several versions of the same stoy
Choosing the right story - criteria


Problems
„We dream in narrative, daydream in narrative, remember, anticipate, hope, despair, believe, doubt, plan, revise, criticize, construct, gossip, learn, hate and love by narrative.“

Barbara Hardy

• represent a rich resource for intercultural learning
• make readers aware of cultural practices, social conditions but also of thoughts, emotions, and values
• can be the starting point for great variety of activities
• link well to topics and cross-curricular work
• offer a major source of language experience
• are enjoyable and create a positive learning atmosphere

--> Storytelling is unmatched as a tool for stimulating the imagination.

students:

develop listening skills
increase concentration
develop vocabulary --> it produces a sense of joy in language and words
listen with a purpose
are motivated to find and construct coherence and meaning
are supported in understanding by the pictures
can identify themselves with the characters in the story
Children who struggle with reading and writing can be a very good storyteller in the class.
enjoy the participation in the story


content to engage learners
• values and attitudes
• level of language
• literary devices
• educational potential
• potential for follow-up work
• appealing illustrations/layout
• arouse curiosity


How to tell a story


• content to engage learners
• values and attitudes
• level of language
• literary devices
• educational potential
• potential for follow-up work
• appealing illustrations/layout
• arouse curiosity

Working phases with a story

Why?
- to get the students in the right mood
- to arouse the students’ interest
How?
- pictures, sounds, objects
- guess, describe and associate
Why?
- to support the plot
- to motivate
How?
- use of facial expressions and gestures
- use of pictures and objects
- work with your voice
- to involve the students in the story
- use of music/songs

pre-listening activities/
story warmers
while-listening/presentation of the story
Why?
- to consolidate the content
- to work with the story in a meaningful context
how?
- comment on the story
- draw a picture
- work with pictures and speech bubbles
post-listening activities
students from different nations may not be able to respond to the story
References
Stories

• help to store information in the brain and to organize and remember information, and tie content together.
• are interactive
• become a shared experience --> it brings a sense of intimacy and community.
• offer a whole imaginary world created by language
• support all types of learners
• provide authentic data for language learning
• provide motivating content
• unlock students’ creative potential
- draw a picture
- choose and write down some of the vocabulary from the
preparation list
- choose five new words

Follow-up/Post-listening activity:
vocabulary learning

after listening:
 respond to the story
 express feelings about the story
E.g.:
I liked it when …
I thought that …

Main language learning goal:
The children understand enough of the
story to enjoy it.

Core/While-listening activity:
reading the story

first reading:
 read on through the story
 not stopping too much

second reading:
 pause at the end of each page
 repeat key words or ideas
 recall/predict what happens next

Core/While-listening activity:
reading the story

Contrasting vocabulary

What comes to your mind when looking at these two pictures?

- collect the words/phrases on the board
 - two semantic networks
 - key words
pollution
and
paradise

 --> Teacher can translate!


Preparation/Pre-listening activity:
brainstorming vocabulary

Preparation/Pre-listening activity

plot:
A man builds a rocket to escape the polluted earth, lands on a distant star but finds it inhospitable. He then sets off again and lands back on Earth, without realising it. While he has been away, the dinosars have woken up and cleaned up the pollution to create a green and pleasant land again. When the man lands back on Earth, he thinks he is in paradise.

Dinosaurs by Michael Foreman

Example:
Dinosaurs by Michael Foreman

Work phases with a story

Example:
Dinosaurs by Michael Foreman

Work phases with a story

Example:
Dinosaurs by Michael Foreman

Work phases with a story

Example:
Dinosaurs by Michael Foreman

Work phases with a story

plot:
A man builds a rocket to escape the polluted earth, lands on a distant star but finds it inhospitable. He then sets off again and lands back on Earth, without realising it. While he has been away, the dinosars have woken up and cleaned up the pollution to create a green and pleasant land again. When the man lands back on Earth, he thinks he is in paradise.

Cameron, L . (2009): Teaching Language to Young Learners. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Legutke, M. K. & Müller- Hartmann, A. & Schocker-v. Ditfurth, M. (2012): Teaching English in the primary school. Stuttgart: Klett Lerntraining.

Watts, E (2011). Oxford Basics for children: STORYTELLING. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Wright, A. (1998). Storytelling with children. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Wright, A (2004). Storytelling with children. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Internet:

Hamilton, M., & Weiss. M. (2005). The Power of Storytelling in the Classroom. Retrieved from
http://www.rcowen.com/PDFs/CTS%20Ch%201%20for%20website.pdf.
Full transcript