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Shakespherean Sonnet Analysis

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by

Tabetha Kwasnica

on 14 February 2017

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Transcript of Shakespherean Sonnet Analysis

Figurative Language
Theme
"When proud-pied April dress'd in all his trim hath put a spirit of youth in everything. "
- This is personification because it gives the month April humanistic qualities(being proud and dressed well) and also that the month made everything seem younger, brighter, and more cheerful.


"Yet seemed it winter still, and you away."
- This supports the theme of despair in absence by stating that it felt like an eternal winter (gloomy and lonely) while he was separated from his lover.

"Yet nor the lays of birds, nor the sweet smell of different flow'rs in odor and in hue, could make me any summer's story tell."
- This supports the theme by illustrating how while his lover is away, he cannot fully appreciate the lovely summer that is all around him.
Shakespearean Sonnet XCVIII Analysis
Sonnet XCVIII
From you have I been absent in the
spring
When proud pied April, dressed in all his
trim
Hath put a spirit of youth in
everything,
That heavy Saturn laughed and leapt with
him
Yet nor the lays of birds, nor the sweet
smell
Of different flow'rs in odor and in
hue,
Could make me any summer's story
tell
,
Or from their proud lap pluck them where they
grew
,
Nor did I wonder at the lily's
white
,
Nor praise the deep vermillion in the
rose;
They were but sweet, but figures of
delight
,
Drawn after you, you pattern of all
those
Yet seemed it winter still, and you
away,
As with your shadow I with these did
play.

Subject
The poet laments over being apart from his lover. Though it is springtime and everything is lovely and youthful, he cannot fully appreciate the beauty around him because he is separated from his lover.
The theme of sonnet XCVIII is that with the absence of a loved one, the world may seem a darker and lonelier place.
Figurative Language
"That heavy Saturn laughed and leapt with him."
- This alludes to the Roman god, Saturn, who is generally associated with gloom and evil. It means that even the god of darkness became cheerful during the Spring.
Figurative Language

"They were but sweet, but figures of delight, drawn after you, you pattern of all those."
- The poet compares the wonders of Spring to his lover (metaphor), but says that they are derived from him and can never be as beautiful
Figurative Language Ties to the Theme!
Figurative Language
"Yet seemed it winter still, and you away, as with your shadow I with these did play."
- The poet compares his lovers absence to an eternal winter, implying that the world is a gloomy and sad place without his lover by his side. In the second part, the poet states that he can only play with the figures of beauty modeled after his lover, such as the flowers and birds. His "shadow" means the memory of his lover, or a reflection.

Created by Stephanie Davis
and Tabetha Kwasnica
Full transcript