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Introduction to Writing in the CCSS

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Educators Cooperative

on 24 October 2012

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Transcript of Introduction to Writing in the CCSS

Supporting ELA Shift 1 Driving Questions Outcomes: What does writing look like in the CCSS? How does this support ELA shift 1? What does writing look like in the CCSS and how does it support ELA shift 1?
How can I integrate CCSS writing tasks into current and future inquiry projects? 1. Understand the 3 types of writing emphasized in CCSS
2. Identify opportunities for these types of writing in ELA, Math and Projects
3. Plan specifics on incorporating at least one of these writing tasks into next project The ability to write logical arguments based on substantive claims, sound reasoning, and relevant evidence is a cornerstone of the writing standards, with opinion writing—a basic form of argument—extending down into the earliest grades.

Research—both short, focused projects (such as those commonly required in the workplace) and longer term in depth research —is emphasized throughout the standards but most prominently in the writing strand since a written analysis and presentation of findings is so often critical.

Annotated samples of student writing accompany the standards and help establish adequate performance levels in writing arguments, informational/explanatory texts, and narratives in the various grades. CCSS increases the amount of informational vs. narrative text:
50:50 at elementary level
75:25 at secondary level (includes ELA, science, social studies) An Introduction to Writing in the CCSS (NAEP) National Assessment of Educational Progress recommends the following percentages for student writing: ELA SHIFT 1: Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction Focus on type of writing is important:
65% (4th grade)
70% (8th grade)
80% (12th grade)
of student writing should be focused on explaining, analyzing and evaluating nonfiction... supporting the shift to focus on informational texts. Source: CCSS, Key Points in English Language Arts Outcome 1:
Understand the 3 types of writing emphasized in CCSS Opinion /
Argument Narrative Informative /
Explanatory In your grade level
team: Analyze the expectations for the 3 types of writing in your grade level

Analyze your current or future project for opportunities to incorporate writing

Identify when and how this writing will occur Analyze the expectations for the 3 types of writing in your grade level Compare the standard for each type of writing with student example from CCSS Appendix C

What evidence do you see in the sample to support the expectations in the standard? Analyze your current or future project for opportunities to incorporate writing Use your project planning template to identify one or more opportunities for writing (opinion or informative) Identify when and how this writing will occur Use your project planning template to describe the type of writing - including any instruction and resources needed Students will write an opinion piece to defend the
habitat they believe should be preserved Teacher will model an example of this type of writing
Students will be taught the expectations based on the CCSS, and will identify these expectations in the model
Students will use the information from the team's research as their evidence to support their opinion. Teacher designed model
Student checklist for opinion writing
Team research notes to identify supporting evidence What in the driving question encourages written responses?

What in the outcome may require a written response?

How could writing be used by a student to explain or provide information on what was learned?

When could a student develop and write about an opinion, supported by evidence from their research?
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