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Life of Pi: One View of God ENG 4UE

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by

Jared Young

on 27 July 2016

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Transcript of Life of Pi: One View of God ENG 4UE

Life of Pi:
One View of God
by
Jared Young

Muhammad Ali once said...
a belief in a god
The divisions seen between religions have been a very common topic throughout the history of mankind. Although Hindus, Muslims and Christians each differ in the way that they practice their faith they all share one common element-
Therefore,
in the novel
Life of Pi
by Yann Martel, the protagonist Pi's devotion and love for God motivate him to follow different religions to further strengthen his belief in the Creator.
Hinduism
is the faith that Pi first becomes familiar with due to his family's belief in the religion.
Furthermore,
what the author is saying about religion itself through the use of Hinduism is that a belief in God provides a person with comfort.
Pi worships Hinduism because the aspects of Brahman appeal to him.
These ideals can be seen in Pi's beliefs when he says, "Brahman expressed not only in gods but in humans, animals, trees, in a handful of earth, for everything has a trace of divine in it. The truth of life is that Brahman is no different from atman, the spiritual force within us, what you might call the soul" (Martel 53).
The view of a divine force being a part of all things further motivates Pi to practice his original faith. This aspect shows Pi believes that God is a part of the human soul itself and this comforts him making him motivated to exclaim this part of the Hindu faith.
Pi goes through great struggles throughout his journey in the novel and his belief in divine gives him the comfort during the horrific journey. Religion is a key to giving people hope and through the beliefs of Hinduism; Yann Martel is able to show the reader this.
Hinduism plays a very prominent role as a religion in Life of Pi assisting the protagonist in many ways.
Christianity
is another faith that Pi devotes himself too. For instance, Pi worships the faith due to the sacrifice made by Jesus Christ.
This is seen when Pi states, “We must all pass through the garden of Gethsemane. If Christ played with doubt, so must we. If Christ spent an anguished night in prayer, if He burst out from the Cross, "My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?" then surely we are also permitted to doubt.” (Martel 31).
The sacrifice made by Jesus is compelling to the protagonist because the Messiah gave up his own life because he loved mankind. The aspect of love and the courage to make a sacrifice is what motivates Pi to follow Christianity.
Alternatively,
Martel uses the Christian faith as an example of how sacrifice is an important part of life and religion.
The sacrifice of Pi’s religious beliefs is made in order for him to survive the struggle on the boat. An example of this is when Pi gives up on being a devote vegetarian by killing a fish. This clarifies that Martel is trying to show that sometimes sacrifice needs to order to achieve your goals and that in religion you must sacrifice many things in order to follow a faith.
The use of the Christian faith helps Pi in many ways to make it through his journey.
The final religion that Pi becomes a part of is Islam.
To illustrate, the frequent amount of worship done in Islam appeals to Pi’s devotion to God.
This can be seen when he says, “I challenge anyone to understand Islam, its spirit, and not to love it. It is a beautiful religion of brotherhood and devotion.” (Martel 67)
The sheer amount of prayer and worship given to God through the Islamic faith motivates Pi to continue to practice the religion because he wants to prove his devotion to God and this ideal helps him to do so.
Martel uses the Islamic faith to proclaim the importance of worship in religion.
Finally,
The amount of prayer Pi puts in shows he is truly faithful to the Lord. An example of this is when he prays 5 times a day when at sea. The ability for a person to put so much effort in to worship the divine shows that Martel believes that worship is a key component to being religious.
The Islamic faith is used very effectively through the journey in the novel.
In conclusion,
Whether it is through the Hindu, Christian, or Islamic faith, Pi shows his devotion to God through using aspects from each of the three religions he follows. Through the view of the divine being a part of all things, the need for sacrifice and love and the importance of worship, Martel is able to truly craft a great description on what religion is. The boundaries that spread faiths apart do not affect one man’s love for God and Pi perfectly shows this.
Works cited

Cross. Digital image. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 July 2016.

Hindu Symbol. Digital image. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 July 2016.

Islam. Digital image. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 July 2016.

Kalyanverma. "Life of Pi Soundtrack - Pi's Lullaby -
English Sub-Titles." YouTube. YouTube, 10 Jan. 2013. Web. 26 July 2016.

"Life of Pi." Chapters 16–32: Religion. N.p., n.d. Web. 22
July 2016.

Life of Pi Book Cover. Digital image. N.p., n.d. Web. 26
July 2016.

Muhammad Ali. Digital image. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 July
2016.

Martel, Yann. Life of Pi: A Novel. New York: Harcourt,
2001. Print.

Pi's Beliefs. Digital image. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 July 2016.

Pi Fish. Digital image. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 July 2016.

"The LitCharts Study Guide to Life of Pi." LitCharts.
N.p.,n.d. Web. 22 July 2016.

"Rivers, ponds, lakes and streams - they all have different names, but they all contain water. Just as religions do - they all contain truths."
Full transcript