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Music Education

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Kelan Rooney

on 20 December 2013

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Transcript of Music Education

Music Education
"Music expresses that which cannot be said and on which it is impossible to be silent." -Victor Hugo. The concept of music education is vast, stretching as far back as Aristotle and covering everything from singing simple melodies to performing the most glamorous of symphonies. Music education encompasses everything that is music as it is through school that most are first exposed to the concept of becoming a musician and it is only through continued schooling that the concept is realized. As a music educator, making sure that music is played, explored, advocated for, deconstructed, composed, and available in all possible ways to students is imperative. The building blocks of an excellent music educator can be found here in these mind-map forms. The basis of all music education exists within these topics and the best music educators can effectively combine each topic for a well balanced instruction program.
Music Education Practicum
History of Music Education
Beginning with Plato's imaginary idealistic society, music education has grown tremendously over the years. It's prominence in education has been ever waxing and waning however it's developmental importance has never once faltered. In America, it was a music book that was first published and mass produced in order to properly teach the country to sing together in church. It has since been advocated greatly by men such as Thomas Jefferson and Lowell Mason and with the industrial revolution and world wars one and two, the music program that exists today came to be.
What is an Effective Teacher?
An effective teacher is able to plan out their lessons in a way that most directly reaches their students to provide the maximum learning opportunity. Effective teachers can develop a strong set of objectives that are clear, concise, focused, observable, measurable, and can be placed in the correct context for each lesson. To be the most effective, teachers must also be able to properly assess their students through either diagnostic, formative, or summative forms of assessment. The concept of lesson planning is central to the success of a teacher and the proper components of the lesson plan must be addressed. A setting must be established, a rationale must be stated, an anticipatory set to demonstrate the goals of the lesson, the appropriate national and state standards must be addressed, as well as a list of necessary materials, a set objective, list of procedures, proper assessment mechanisms, and a strong closing; these are the components of a successful lesson plan.
Planning Instruction
Planning out instruction is a key task of the music educator and it is most effectively accomplished through the making of a lesson plan. A lesson plan breaks down each aspect of your lesson step by step. Lesson plans can be spread out over an entire curriculum individually, or even entire curriculum sized goals can be written out in a lesson plan format. Effective planning leads to effective teaching, and it is through planning that teachers are able to stay on schedule and not become over encumbered by smaller matters building up over the course of the program.
Standards for Music Education
The national standards for music education are relatively new have transformed the modern music classroom. They include singing, performing, improvising, composing, reading, listening, evaluating, understanding in relation to the arts and understanding in relation to history and culture. The standards are designed to unify the goals of all music educators across the country, and if each educator were to apply each of these concepts into their curriculum, the education system would theoretically be unified. A unified system of education would mean easier forms of assessment, higher total standards, and an increased level of learning for students as a result.
Assessment
Assessment is one of the trickiest aspects of teaching in a music environment as it is such an individualized activity; there is so much room for variation. The three main forms of assessment are Diagnostic, Formative, and Summative. Diagnostic assessment being a written worksheet or evaluation to gauge the level of the group, formative assessment being any sort of playing related or worksheet related, low-stakes evaluation, and summative assessment being a high-stakes written or playing exam. Assessment is a large issue in the music education community due to its inconsistencies, the debate over what level of assessment is necessary to prove growth and how that growth can be quantified: should a music teacher and his/her students be graded on the same assessment scale as a mathematics or English teacher?
Teacher Identity and Development
Identity is a constantly evolving part of you, and everyone has their own; it is a combination of every factor in your life from your gender to your choice in musical instrument and is truly the definition of who you are as a person. In reference to teaching, it can be as simple as asking "why do you want to teach?" which most music educators find to be a more difficult question to answer than expected; it is through development as a teacher, and towards certification that a teaching identity develops. The most effective way to develop is through hard work, putting your shoulder to the grindstone and getting everything that has to be done, done.
Classroom Management Techniques
Philosophy
Music Technology
Choral Music
Curriculum Basis
Diversity and Exceptionalities
Elementary Music
Basic Learning Theories
Teaching Repertoire

Observing and Analyzing Teaching Behavior
In order to be successful in a classroom environment, teachers must be prepared for classroom management. Music classrooms are especially hard to manage due to their size and the fact that the goal of the class is to create noise. It is very easy to loose control over a large class and it is through classroom management techniques that any problems can be avoided. In addition to maintaining the sanity of the teacher, management is necessary to foster learning as time can be easily wasted, any and all liability issues can be avoided, and students leave with a firmer grasp on the concept of self control. Fast paced instructions, complete teaching cycles, proper organization, establishing a lesson plan, being flexible with said plan, and providing specific feedback are all excellent ways to maintain control of your classroom.
A strong teaching philosophy is crucial to success in music education; whether it is written out and fine tuned to the most finite detail or entirely mental, a good teacher will apply their philosophy to everything they do. A philosophy is a set of guiding principals, something to set as an extra standard, a strong and personal belief that can be used to aide your students in any way possible. The teaching philosophy should be exactly that: personal beliefs, things that you want to see happen and that you will make yourself do. The standard philosophy should include a description of what is meaningful and uniquely valuable about your music ensembles, what student participation should look like according to your philosophical stance, and what role of the teacher is implied through that stance.
In an ever-changing, fast-paced technological world, every year the next "big thing" will be out, available, and advertising it's use in your classroom; knowing how to effectively handle these technologies is incredibly important whether it is through budgeting or short term exposure. Most importantly, technology is not a toy or a crutch but a tool in which to teach; it should never distract from the pedagogy, only enhance it. Accept the fact that most students will understand the technology better than yourself and use that as an opportunity to push farther. Technology can be a "gateway drug" into music for students that don’t already participate in a traditional ensemble and can be an excellent way to build your program. Just remember that no amount of new or exciting technology can substitute for bad pedagogy.
Thinking with spirals: the Jerome Bruner spiral curriculum concept depicts a large spiral in which the spiral itself is formative assessment and development, and benchmarks are found where each section of the spiral lines up with another above and below it in the form of summative assessment. With this visual in mind, a curriculum should include the programs philosophy, overall goals, all benchmarks, all required resources, implemented teaching strategies, assessment opportunities, and all required materials. Within the world of music education, it is important that curriculums are well structured and match their surroundings; to accomplish this, visiting the directors at other schools in the community, whether they are schools that feed into your program or schools that your program feeds into, matching your curriculum with those around you will help create the most effective situation for musical growth. It is important to remember that a curriculum is never set in stone for music educators; it should always be shifting, changing, and adapting like a living organism. Never settle!
Students at the elementary level are capable of so much more than we think they are, never hold back on the reigns because you never know where they might take you! That being said, don't over-step Piaget's stages of development in your classroom. In elementary music education, students can learn the basics of all music and have fun doing it through interactive singing, dancing, composing, and rhythmic games. The three most influential contributors to elementary music education are Carl Orff, Emile Jaques - Dalcrose, and Zoltan Kodaly; Orff focuses on an "elemental" approach utilizing body movements and the natural rhythm of children. Dalcrose believed that rhythm equals motion and is the fundamental source of music; he focused on singing, ear training, harmony, counterpoint, form, history, and application with a major emphasis on both vocal and instrumental ensembles. Kodaly believed that music should be, and is accessible to everyone stating that "No musical knowledge of any kind can be acquired without the reading of music." He believed music education should start between the ages of one and a half to two years of age and that children are most musically receptive between the ages of three and seven. Elementary music is a crucial aspect of the American public school system as it cultivates creativity and allows young students to express themselves.
Teaching Choir is totally unlike teaching instrumental music for the students themselves are the instruments. This means age, health, what they had for lunch, and even the time of day can effect how the students sound. That being said, singing is the most fundamental form of creating music and can be extremely rewarding as long as it is approached from the correct angle. Choir music in an ensemble is meant to develop the students as musicians rather than as an ensemble so great focus is placed on warm-ups and vocal training in addition to the repertoire. In relation to voice, it is important to understand the limits of each student's range as pushing them could potentially harm their voices.
In a balanced classroom, everyone is treated equally regardless of race, beliefs, disability, or otherwise; no student will be denied the chance to learn and grow. Diversities include gender and gender roles, formerly home schooled students, and different ethnicity/minorities. Disabilities and exceptions include anything from students who are blind, deaf, or physically handicapped, to students with mental retardation, ADHD, or behavioral disorders; even students who learn faster than others. Incorporating these factors into a program is difficult however there are strategies that can be used to address any special needs a student may have.
Learning theories are ideas that have been developed over the years by great minds such as Ivan Pavlov, Jean Piaget, Jerome Bruner, Benjamin Bloom, Lev Vygotsky, and many others who have dedicated their lives to studying how we learn. Learning theories can be broken down into three main categories, Cognitive, Behavioral, and Constructivist, each of which can be applied in many scenarios to promote the most appropriate style of learning for each student and each ensemble. Of the learning theories, Jean Piaget's concept of Stages of Development stands out for it's breakthrough in how teaching is approached; before his work, students were treated at all ages as smaller adults despite the fact that their brains are not even formally operational until age 11. Lev Vygotsky developed the idea of a Zone of Paraxial Development in which two people at different skill levels are put together, both benefit just as when a fresh log is placed by a log that is already burning, they both burn brighter.
A teaching repertoire is a device used to map out specific skills that could be used in a classroom environment. A strong teaching repertoire is detailed, strict and to the point, without any "fluff" as educators must be as specific as possible in all that they do. A teaching repertoire can include anything from how to teach scales to how students enter your classroom and what you say to their parents when they ask if they can help. It is a self-created guide to your classroom.
As an educator, observing and analyzing every teacher's behaviors in the field is an excellent way to see everything that is taught within the practicum class in action. In the field, students need to be able to notice "what works" in practice and what teachers may be doing wrong, these observations should be recorded in a notebook of some sort and analyzed through an observation form. Interactions with teachers in the field should always be respectful, dignified, and well mannered. Students should always be watching for examples of pedagogical knowledge, musicianship, correct rapport, good communication, professionalism, and classroom management and looking for ways to include these ideas in their own teaching styles.
The concept of cognitive conflict needs to be recognized as one of the many ways people learn. Through assimilation (similar or known ideas) accommodation (different or new ideas) and equilibration (balancing these ideas to create knowledge).
Pedagogy
Beliefs should be flexible but not breakable; an open mind is different from an empty mind. Don't shut out student's ideas, consider them and try your best to apply them.
Pedagogy
Pedagogy
The concept of cognitive conflict needs to be recognized as one of the many ways people learn. Through assimilation (similar or known ideas) accommodation (different or new ideas) and equilibration (balancing these ideas to create knowledge).
Knowing well the difference between sympathy and empathy; being able to walk in another person's shoes or simply understanding where they are coming from
Philosophy
Belief is held as truth by the one holding it and does not require external validation or evidence of truth.
Philosophy
An identity is a series of beliefs in which you filter every experience you have through. Throughout life you build communities, and your identity is the result of your trajectories to and from these communities.
Philosophy
Philosophy
Understanding where music education comes from is an important part of advocating for music today.
Philosophy
Music education history helps us understand how our program began and what helped or hindered its development over the years.
Philosophy
Ideas discussed by Plato and Aristotle are still relevant today and can make a difference in the music classroom
Pedagogy
Lessons learned from Plato regarding the overall state of educated society can impact how students can best be exposed to a proper music education and advocate for why this is important.
Pedagogy
Ensuring that everyone in your class has access to the same education, which is Aristotle's idea of a perfect education system, will improve opportunities for your students in the future and provide a level of excellence that can't be matched.
Pedagogy
Making sure students understand why they are in a music class, other than because they chose to be, will help enrich their development as musicians and students.
By Kelan Rooney
Philosophy
An effective teacher can get through to their students because they understand what it means to learn and be taught, effective teachers never stop learning.
Philosophy
An effective teacher can go beyond making a lesson plan and instead analyze why there is a lesson plan and why certain aspects of it are necessary or unnecessary.
Philosophy
Effective teachers are engaging and make full use of their time keeping things fast paced and challenging while still possible for all students' levels.
Pedagogy
Creating lesson plans for each lesson and mapping out entire semesters are two very necessary aspects of being an effective teacher.
Pedagogy
Effective teachers communicate well to their students making sure they know why they are in the class, what they will learn from it, and how they will know that they are ready to move on.
Pedagogy
Teachers need to properly utilize all forms of assessment in their classroom including the big three (formative, diagnostic, and summative) and any other forms one might think of.
MU 286 Music Education Practicum
December 2013
Mind Map Final Project
Colorado State University
Pedagogy
Every music classroom in the United States should have the national standards for music education posted somewhere inside where students can access them.
Pedagogy
Recognizing and following state standards will lead to a more proficient program as those standards are in place for a reason.
Pedagogy
Actually applying national and state standards to your lessons is imperative and will help both you and your students get the most they possibly can out of the program.
Philosophy
The creation of national music education standards was no small feat and they should be followed not only because they are excellent guidelines but because they symbolize the national force that is music education.
Philosophy
The standards were created to unify music education across America as to better provide for all of our students.
Philosophy
Unity in education is how and why America stands out in the world above many other cultures where only the privileged are educated, we do not allow anyone to fall behind.
Pedagogy
Use technology in a way that doesn’t distract you or your students, keep everything necessary and nothing extra.
Pedagogy
Play music for students as they enter your classroom, whether it's the song they will be playing that day or a piece on their listening test, make sure they are constantly exposed to what music actually sounds like.
Pedagogy
Tune the class electronically! In today's world, it should be extremely easy to set a tuner on the wall or whiteboard with a projector and have students learn what being in tune and being out of tune sounds like.
Philosophy
Technology is an excellent way to keep students engaged in the modern world and as students become more modern and technologically advanced, they start to crave more advanced ways of learning.
Philosophy
The internet can be a limitless resource as long as it is used responsibly; sites such as YouTube, Pandora, and even iTunes increase our ability to listen to music beyond what anyone ten years ago could have imagined.
Philosophy
It's hard to catch up to the ever-evolving state of our philosophy, try to think ahead when ordering new items in terms of how valuable they will be five years from now as opposed to how useful they would be right now.
Philosophy
Successful classroom management creates the perfect environment for learning whereas the lack thereof makes it impossible for students to learn.
Philosophy
Disciplinary systems should never be harsh, but instead teach students to make smarter decisions.
Philosophy
Have a plan for everything that could possibly go wrong and what you will do if it does go wrong; make sure students know enough of this plan to know what they are getting into if they willfully choose to act out.
Pedagogy
Have a set list of ensemble rules in addition or in tandem with your school rules and have that list posted on your office.
Pedagogy
Keep students bust so they don't have time to act out in any way, never have a student just sitting there.
Pedagogy
Lead the classroom, don’t command it! Allow students to step up into leadership positions, reward hard work and good behavior and punish bad behavior with the lack of a reward not a punishment.
Philosophy
Establishing a teaching philosophy holds you and your class to a higher standard. It's something to work for and to reach for, never settling for less.
Philosophy
Integrate your philosophy into your curriculum, see how it holds up with the national and state standards, develop a way to "make everyone happy" in that you follow the rules but are open to new and fun ideas.
Philosophy
Teaching philosophies are something to live by, not something to write and be done with, try to live by what you say and students will appreciate you that much more for it.
Pedagogy
Make your philosophy available to parents and students, pass it out on the first day and put it on your website. Assess yourself by giving letting the students assess you and how well you followed it at the end of the semester/year.
Pedagogy
Make what you write a reality! It is easy to write a bunch of wonderful things but to make them come true is a whole new story.
Pedagogy
Continue to develop it as you go, you never have a final draft and let every new experience you have remind you of this.
Philosophy
Think with spirals!
Philosophy
The concepts of benchmarks and forms of assessment must all be incorporated and timed appropriately for the students benefit.
Philosophy
A curriculum should never lay stagnant and must be constantly developing through your own experiences.
Pedagogy
Be willing to accept feedback from others, develop and evolve the curriculum semester by semester or year by year, make sure it fits in context with the schools surrounding you.
Pedagogy
Include everything in your curriculum, don't leave anything to chance and make sure you are as prepared to teach it as your students are to learn it.
Pedagogy
Stick to the curriculum you write! Feel free to add more if you have time but never do less that what you originally expect to do. Understandably if you decide a certain topic is irrelevant than it is acceptable to remove it.
Pedagogy
Lead with actions, make sure the students are engaged in some activity or another and use those activities to solidify the student's understanding of the subject.
Pedagogy
Correctly apply Piaget's stages of development by challenging the proficient students and reaching out a helping hand to any who are struggling.
Pedagogy
Be fun, be musical and be excited! Make sure your students take that from you and run with it, let them know that making music is fun and exciting.
Philosophy
Elementary students are the most energetic and open students you can possibly teach, so teach them correctly!
Philosophy
The theories of Orff, Dalcrose, and Kodaly should be applied in the elementary classroom at multiple levels, all used in tandem as opposed to one or the other.
Philosophy
Education at an elementary level is perhaps the most influential stage of a student's development and the availability of music as a form of expression is crucial.
Philosophy
Assessments are important for the students, they provide positive feedback on the work they have been doing and keep them on their toes, ex: if they know they have a playing test, they will work for it.
Philosophy
Diagnostic, Formative, and Summative assessments should be evenly spaced out by weight and time as to not overload the students.
Philosophy
Pedagogy
Emphasize the weight of performances, treat them all as forms of assessment whether it's playing in front of the class or in the final concert, everything is a performance.
Some students are lead to believe that music classes are "easy A's" and this leads to students giving less than their all. Remind them that they are as mush working to be better musicians as they are working for a grade.
Pedagogy
Scale tests, memorization tests, theory tests; make it clear that students are learning in your classroom.
Pedagogy
Plan and create effective tests! Don't just assume that since it is a music class the students don't need to be tested as often as other classes.
Philosophy
A lesson without a lesson plan will never go smoothly, because even if you are certain you know exactly what you want to teach and how, life will throw a curveball at you and you will stall.
Philosophy
Lesson plans help you stay on track during class time and are not hard to create outside of class; they are worth the extra effort for your students.
Philosophy
Effective planning leads to effective teaching.
Pedagogy
Apply what you write out in your lesson plans to your classes, don't write filler materials and "wing it".
Pedagogy
Let your students know what the plan is, write out your objectives on the board or which standards you will be addressing that day.
Pedagogy
Be willing to change your plan at a moments notice; don't stick to something that isn’t working.
Philosophy
Choral music is the most ancient musical tradition we know of and should always be given respect in that regard.
Philosophy
Vocal music is challenging and exposing, be open with your students, make sure they accept who they are and what they sound like, even if they think they sound bad chances are they are just insecure.
Philosophy
Encourage everyone to sing out, singing is fun and enjoyable, and choir class should be as well.
Pedagogy
Pay attention to vocal ranges and changing voices, pick appropriate repertoire for your ensemble.
Pedagogy
Use warm ups as vocal training, not just warm ups, they are too important to be glanced over.
Pedagogy
Choir programs require mush more individualized attention than any other ensemble, and while students should always be responsible for their own parts, it is important to work with them to develop their abilities both outside and inside the classroom.
Pedagogy
Breaking down lessons, holding separate sectionals, and doing anything extra and accommodating is absolutely necessary in addressing students will exceptional learning abilities.
Pedagogy
You must find ways to make music accessible to all forms of students, such as Braille sheet music and extra listening sessions for the hearing impaired.
Pedagogy
Accept anyone into your program, everyone who wants to learn has the right to.
Philosophy
Students with exceptionalities will never be denied the opportunity to learn under any circumstance.
Philosophy
Our society is full of both exceptional and diverse learners and people, programs that are accommodating to both with be the most successful.
Philosophy
Students that are ahead of the learning curve should be given opportunities to expand even farther, never stifled or used exclusively to help the struggling students.
Philosophy
Make sure these ideas are always in the back of your mind, but don't fixate on them constantly, be open to developing your own philosophies.
Philosophy
Survey your class, discover who is at which level of development and try to apply this to how you teach the class.
Philosophy
Learning theories should always be taken into account when teaching, the most direct way to get through to students is through their correct learning theory.
Pedagogy
Survey your class, discover who is at which level of development and try to apply this to how you teach the class.
Pedagogy
Pay attention to how your students are learning from you and adjust between theories as necessary.
Pedagogy
The Zone or Paraxial Development should be implemented in the classroom by mixing students by skill level, allow new students into the upper ensembles for a short amount of time so they can experience what it is like to perform at a higher level.
Pedagogy
Return to your teaching repertoire list as often as possible to revise it based upon your experiences teaching.
Pedagogy
Teach how you say you will teach, follow what you write.
Pedagogy
Write your teaching repertoire as a checklist, try to accomplish or focus on every subject each month/semester/year.
Philosophy
Teaching repertoire is pedagogy.
Philosophy
It is important for you and your students to know how you will conduct yourself in the classroom and for what reasons.
Philosophy
Continue to develop your teaching repertoire every day, every new idea is important.
Philosophy
Be eternally open to all opportunities for professional development.
Philosophy
Learn by watching, then doing, just as learning by rote can be effective in students learning, learning through observing is invaluable to music educators.
Philosophy
Be eternally open to all opportunities for professional development.
Pedagogy
Be extremely respectful to anyone you are observing, they are not only valuable connections but also people who have truly worked hard to be where they are and deserve respect.
Pedagogy
Grow from what you observe, actually implement the good ideas and avoid the bad ones.
Pedagogy
Go and observe everywhere, every time you have a chance to watch another person teach, no matter what grade or skill level, do it and analyze them.
Campbell, Musician & Teacher, An Orientation to Music Education
Thompson, Considering Beliefs in Learning to Teach Music
Mark, Music Education Source Readings - Plato and Aristotle; Charlemagne; Luther and Calvin; Pestalozzi
Brand, Music Teachers: What makes them great?
Lehman, A Vision of the Future: Looking at the Standards
Reimer, A Philosophy of Music Education
Langer, Expressiveness - Problems of Art
Hodges, Why study Music?
Leung, Rescores for Music Education Advocacy

Conway, Curriculum Writing in Music
Campbell Ch.7, Teaching Music to Children
Campbell Ch.13, Assessment
Goolsby, Assessment in Instrumental Music

Mark and Madura, Competencies that Music Teachers Need to be Successful
Bauer, Classroom Management for Ensembles
Campbell Ch.8, The Choral Classroom
Kelly, Equality of Education
Campbell Ch.11, Diverse Learners and Learning Styles

Kelly, Social Components of Music Learning
Campbell Ch.6, Theories of Musical Thinking and Doing.

Campbell Ch.15, Out in the Field: Look-Listen- Learn
Guest Lecture with Dan Berard
How can I develop myself as a teacher while I am still a student?
How can the ideas of Plato and Aristotle apply to today's extremely modern world? Do they still apply?
Will an administrator always require a lesson plan? How quickly should most objectives be accomplished in larger ensembles?
Should lesson plans be extremely in depth or more generalized? Does that change in certain situations?
How is it possibly to incorporate all aspects of the national standards in every ensemble? Wouldn't some be impossible/unreasonable for the students?
How can I break the stereotype that music classes are easy and shouldn't be taken seriously?
How will I be able to handle myself in the worst case scenarios? When will I be able to practice what it's like to be in a classroom that is entirely out of my control?
I know I agree with my philosophy, but what if multiple students of mine disagree? How flexible should I be in at least temporarily changing my beliefs for the benefit of the class?
In investing for new technologies, how can I possibly look ahead to the future when new products are being released so quickly?
As an instrumentally focused musician/person, how do I train myself to be able to teach choir as well? Especially if I personally don't have a strong singing voice?
Upon entering a new school, is it wise to stick with the curriculum already intact or substitute it with my own?
For students with learning disabilities, how do I keep them up to speed during class without slowing the rest of the class down?
If people spend their entire lives trying to understand Kodaly, Orff, and Dlacrose, how do I go about figuring them out in such a short amount of time?
Why isn't the Zone of Paraxial development more widely used? Does it have a prominent negative side effect?
How mush is too much? At what point do you have too many ways to teach than you can keep track of?
How would you approach an educator you are observing with an observation of their actions that you disagree with? Or would you let it pass and move on?
Basic Learning Theories should be applied as early as elementary school if not sooner; many of the men responsible for the learning theories knew or were influenced by Orff, Kodaly, and Dalcrose.
Elementary education teachers must be as effective as possible, the students have short attention spans and a fast paced lesson plan must be in place.
Being an effective teacher is being able to teach anything at any level where there is a need, in choral music there is no exception.
In many cases, being an effective teacher means being able to manage your classroom efficiently to keep everything productive.
Effective teachers learn from others and are able to apply what they learn to their own methods.
Successfully planning out your instruction with a lesson plan is a crucial part of becoming an effective teacher.
Lesson plans should be based off of your curriculum and work towards fulfilling the entire curriculum day by day.
Lesson plans should reflect reaching repertoire and allow for teachers to use their knowledge to their full potential.
Assessments should be regularly scheduled into your curriculum.
Technology can aide students with learning disabilities and exceptional learners.
Various forms of assessment are built into the national standards for music education
A strong teaching philosophy will incorporate all forms of assessment and how they play a role in the classroom.
Through establishing an identity as a teacher, you are building your philosophy.
When establishing a philosophy, apply the theories of basic learning.
Everything is Connected through this...
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