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INTRODUCCION

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by

Alejandro Restrepo

on 4 November 2014

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Transcript of INTRODUCCION

HISTORY
INTRODUCTION
REFERENCE
TECHNIQUES
Crawl
Fathom
Butterfly
Back
Stroke Side

THE SWIMMING
Swimming is the art of holding and moving,
using your arms and legs, on or under the water. It can be done as a recreational activity or as a competitive sport. Because humans do not swim instinctively, swimming is a skill that must be learned.

The sport of swimming has been recorded since prehistoric times; the earliest recording of swimming dates back to Stone Age paintings from around 10000 years ago. Written references date from 2000 BC. Some of the earliest references to swimming include the Gilgamesh, the Iliad, the Odyssey, the Bible, Beowulf, The Quran along with others. In 1538, Nikolaus Wynmann, a German professor of languages, wrote the first swimming book, The Swimmer or A Dialogue on the Art of Swimming (Der Schwimmer oder ein Zweigespräch über die Schwimmkunst).
Swimming emerged as a competitive sport in the 1830s in England. In 1828, the first indoor swimming pool, St George's Baths was opened to the public.
By 1837, the National Swimming Society was holding regular swimming competitions in six artificial swimming pools, built around London.
Captain Matthew Webb was the first man to swim the English Channel (between England and France), in 1875. He used breaststroke, swimming 21.26 miles (34.21 km) in 21 hours and 45 minutes.
Swimming became part of the first modern Olympic Games in 1896 in Athens.
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