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Smarter Balanced in Depth: Claims & Assessment Targets

At the heart of the Common Core is to have every student college and career ready by the time they graduate from high school. Claims were developed by Smarter Balanced in order to assess the achievement of that goal. Assessment Targets stem from each
by

Robert Gutierrez

on 15 February 2013

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Transcript of Smarter Balanced in Depth: Claims & Assessment Targets

FUSD Secondary Instruction
Preparing for the Common Core
In-Depth Series Smarter Balanced in Depth:
Claims & Assessment Targets Claims
Overall Claims
Four Claims
Assessment Targets
Preliminary Summative Assessment Blueprints Claims This Module will Cover Overall Claim Assessment Targets Assessment Targets for Claim #1 The overall claim of the SBAC for grade 11 is to have all students demonstrate college and career readiness in ELA and Mathematics

Additional claims were made in order to assess whether student have achieved the overall claim Four Claims The four additional claims that are tied to the overall claim for Math are:
Claim #1 – Concepts & Procedures
Students can explain and apply mathematical concepts and interpret and carry out mathematical procedures with precision and fluency Four Claims Claim #2 – Problem Solving
Students can solve a range of complex well-posed problems in pure and applied mathematics, making productive use of knowledge and problem solving strategies Four Claims Claim #3 – Communicating Reasoning
Students can clearly and precisely construct viable arguments to support their own reasoning and to critique the reasoning of others Four Claims Claim #4 – Modeling and Data
Students can analyze complex, real-world scenarios and can construct and use mathematical models to interpret and solve problems Assessment Targets For each one of the four claims, there are assessment targets to measure a student’s achievement in a particular claim

What follows are lists of assessment targets for each of the four claims A) Extend the properties of exponents to rational exponents.

B) Use properties of rational and irrational numbers.

C) Reason quantitatively and use units to solve problems.

D) Interpret the structure of expressions.

E) Write expressions in equivalent forms to solve problems.

F) Perform arithmetic operations on polynomials.

G) Create equations that describe numbers or relationships.

H) Understand solving equations as a process of reasoning and explain the reasoning. I) Solve equations and inequalities in one variable.

J) Represent and solve equations and inequalities graphically.

K) Understand the concept of a function and use function notation.

L) Interpret functions that arise in applications in terms of a context.

M) Analyze functions using different representations.

N) Build a function that models a relationship between two quantities.

O) Prove geometric theorems.

P) Summarize, represent and interpret data on a single count or measurement variable. Assessment Targets for
Claim #2 Claim #3 Claim #4 A) Apply mathematics to solve well-posed problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace.

B) Select and use appropriate tools strategically

C) Interpret results in the context of a situation.

D) Identify important quantities in a practical situation and map their relationships (e.g., using diagrams, two-way tables, graphs, flow charts, or formulas). A) Test propositions or conjectures with specific examples.

B) Construct, autonomously, chains of reasoning that will justify or refute propositions or conjectures.

C) State logical assumptions being used.

D) Use the technique of breaking an argument into cases.

E) Distinguish correct logic or reasoning from that which is flawed, and—if there is a flaw in the argument—explain what it is.

F) Base arguments on concrete referents such as objects, drawings, diagrams, and actions.

G) At later grades, determine conditions under which an argument does and does not apply. (For example, area increases with perimeter for squares, but not for all plane figures.) A) Apply mathematics to solve problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace.

B) Construct, autonomously, chains of reasoning to justify mathematical models used, interpretations made, and solutions proposed for a complex problem.

C) State logical assumptions being used.

D) Interpret results in the context of a situation.

E) Analyze the adequacy of and make improvements to an existing model or develop a mathematical model of a real phenomenon.

F) Identify important quantities in a practical situation and map their relationships (e.g., using diagrams, two-way tables, graphs, flow charts, or formulas).

G) Identify, analyze, and synthesize relevant external resources to pose or solve problems. Preliminary Summative Assessment Blueprints You are at the end of this module
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