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Group Work Case Study

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Emily Fox

on 5 December 2017

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Transcript of Group Work Case Study

Case Study:
"
Soon Mrs. Freeman noticed strange interactional patterns emerging in the class. At first, she let students choose their own partners for pairwork, as she felt it was more democratic. Yet few native English speaking students would choose to work with any EL" (Metro & Pinnow, 2017, p.1).
Course Reading:

"In setting up a classroom for second-language learners, teachers can point out to English-speaking children that there are children in the classroom who speak a different language, that it will take time for the second-language learners to begin to speak a new language, and that there are some ways that the English-speaking children can help in this process" (Tabors, 2008, P. 103).
Make the students feel included when they might be isolated from the group by saying their name and asking them to join the group. This is a routine that could be used by the students and not just the teacher.
Group Work Case Study
Introduction
3 reasons why group work is important for ELs:

2nd Grade Teacher: Mrs. Freeman
ESOL Teacher: Mr. Hernandez
Mistakes/Misconceptions
Case study quote:

“Finally, she let Juan and Maria work together. At first Mrs. Freeman tried to enforce the school’s “English only” policy, but she soon found that when Juan and Maria spoke to each other in Spanish, they could sometimes complete at least a little of the work. So she told them just to do the work in Spanish and not worry about the English" (Metro & Pinnow, 2017, p.1).
Course reading:
“EL learners do not in any case have time to study English as a subject before they use it to learn other things: they must begin to use it as a medium for learning as soon as they enter school, simultaneously developing academic English hand in hand with curriculum knowledge” (Gibbons, 2002, P. 59).

The Principal: Mrs. Jones
School Counselor: Mrs. Smith
Spanish-English Interpreter: Ms. Diaz
1. More chances to interact with other speakers
2. Tend to take more turns
3. Comprehension increases
(Gibbons Ch. 3)
Positive Steps Towards Change
Collaboration Ideas
Misconceptions/Mistakes
Positive Steps Towards Change
Collaboration
Misconceptions/Mistakes
Positive Steps Towards Change
Collaboration
Misconceptions/Mistakes
Positive Steps Towards Change
Collaboration
Misconceptions/Mistakes
Positive Steps Towards Change
Collaboration
References
Conclusion
Group-work according to Gibbons:
“Well-designed and well-run group work offers many affordences for language learning and has important advantages for second language development”. (Gibbons, year, P. 49).
Case Study: "Suggested EL students work in groups on their own in a separate classroom, using computer programs to learn English." (Metro & Pinnow, 2017, p.1)
Course Reading:
Case Study:
"The problem might be, she suggested, that Mrs. Freeman wasn't being tough enough on ELs. Ranking students according to their test results on the classroom wall, so the ELs could see how they measured up, might help." (Metro & Pinnow, 2008, p.3)

Course Reading:
"From an educator's point on view, however, how quickly a child gains control over a second language may be more than simply academic interest." (Tabors, 2008, p.82)
"During groupwork, for EL learners, comprehension is also increased, because asking questions, exchanging information, and solving problems all provide a context where words are repeated, ideas are rephrased, problems are restated and meanings are refined" (Gibbons, 2002, p. 50).
Case Study:
"Under pressure from a small, vocal group of parents who were unhappy about the presence of the Latino families, Mrs. Jones instituted an "English only" rule on school grounds."(Metro &
Pinnow, 2017, p.1 )
Course Reading:
"In the process of learning English, children's primary cultural and linguistic identities should not be submerged, nor should the process of learning a new language and culture be a one-way journey away from family and community."(Gibbons, 2015, p.29)
"...The mother tongue can be incorporated into and English-Medium classroom and used as a resource for learning." (Gibbons, 2015, p.29)
Case Study:

"Ms. Dias was alarmed to hear that Sally had hardly spoken all year- her own kids had picked up conversational English within a few months..." (Metro & Pinnow, 2017, p.3)

Course Reading:
"it is possible that the amount of time they spend in the nonverbal period may be related to how long it takes for them to make the decision to start learning the new language." (Tabors, 2008, p.76)
Case Study:
"When Mr. Hernandez heard Juan and Maria's stories of how they'd been bullied by native English speaking peers during group work, he urged Mrs. Freeman to stop using group work at all. Mr. Hernandez advised the EL's to stay aloof from their native English-speaking peers until they'd become more fluent (Metro & Pinnow, 2017, pg 3).
Case Study:
"Mr. Hernandez advised the EL's to stay aloof from their native English-speaking peers until they'd become more fluent (Metro & Pinnow, 2017, pg. 3).


Course Reading:
"Second-language learners hear more contextualized language from English speaking peers in groups than would have been possible if their only conversational partners had been the teachers in the classroom" (Tabors, 2008, pg. 102).
Case study:
"Under pressure from a small, vocal group of parents who were unhappy about the presence of Latino families, Mrs.Jones instituted an "English only" rule on school grounds." (Metro & Pinnow, 2017, p. 1)
Course Reading:
"Recognize that children can and will acquire the use of English even when their home language is used and respected. This recommendation actually combines two important points: Young children 1) can and will learn a second language in a supportive social setting, and 2) do not have to give up their first language to learn a second language." (Tabors, 2008, p.178)
"Suggested the ELs could work in groups on their own in a separate classroom, using computer programs to learn English." (Metro & Pinnow, 2017, p.1)
Case Study:

"Mrs. Freeman asked to meet with Mr.Hernandez, the ESOL teacher; Mrs. Jones the principle; Mrs. Smith, the counselor; and Ms. Diaz, the Spanish-English interpreter." (Metro & Pinnow, 2017, p.4)

I think this was a great idea on Mrs.Freeman's part. For future collaboration, Mrs. Jones should immediately schedule weekly meetings for all the teachers and herself to review their own group work, while collaborating with each other. But, most importantly to discuss issues they are still having in the classroom or things they have noticed a change in and help one another with the ELs in their classrooms.
Course Reading:
"Allowing children to participate in group work helps them to join the social group and be exposed to more English language" (Tabors 2008, pg. 99).
To take positive steps forward, I could admit that I am wrong and have all students work together in the same classroom so they are able to interact with the English language more.
My collaboration is with the ESOL teacher and the interpreter. I would have one or both come in a few times a week to work in small groups(while the ELs are working with each other and English speakers in the classroom).
Have meetings with them to ensure curriculum is the same.
I could also collaborate with other teachers in my grade that have ELs in their class to discuss which methods are working or not working for them.
Work with Mrs. Smith to hold an assembly over bullying. Also have in-class mini lessons over bullying, how to be good friend, and accepting others. This will foster relationships in the classroom and make group work more effective because students should be more accepting of the EL's and want to help each other in their learning.
"In general, language proficiency may be defined as the ability to use language effectively and appropriately throughout the range of social, personal, school, and work situations required for daily living in a given society." (Peregoy & Boyle, 2004, p.34)

This definition of language proficiency, demonstrates just how large of a role the English Language Learner's social environment plays. Intentional group work done well is a essential component of a well-rounded curriculum that supports second language acquisition.





Gibbons, P. (2002). Scaffolding Language, Scaffolding
Learning: Teaching Second Language Learners in the
Mainstream Classroom. (1st ed.). Portsmouth, NH:
Heinemann

Peregoy, S. F., & Boyle, O. F. (2004). Reading, Writing and
Learning in ESL: A Resource Book for K-12 Teachers. (4th
ed.). Allyn & Bacon

Tabors, P. (2008). One Child, Two Languages: A Guide for
Early Childhood Educators of Children Learning English as
a Second Language. (2nd ed.). Baltimore, MD: Paul H.
Brookes Publishing Co.
Work with teachers to create buddy systems where ELs will be partnered with English speakers. This will foster relationships in the classroom and make group work more effective because they can help eachother in the learning process.
"Group work should not encourage talk, it should require it" (Gibbons, 2002, p. 56
I could work with Mr. Hernandez the ESOL teacher and meet with the EL students who struggle socially.
In these meetings I woud help provide these students with the language skills necessary for giving them the confidence to get involved in group work
Full transcript