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Nothing Gold Can Stay

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by

Alyssa Eyre

on 19 October 2014

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Transcript of Nothing Gold Can Stay

Poetic Narrative
Nothing Gold Can Stay
Human Experience
Nothing Gold Can Stay
The Power of Language
Nothing Gold Can Stay
Poetic Themes and Messages
Nothing Gold Can Stay
Poetic Devices
Nothing Gold Can Stay
So dawn goes down to day.
Her early leaf's a flower,
But only so an hour.
Nothing Gold Can Stay
Robert Frost
Nature's first green is gold
Her hardest hue to hold.
Then leaf subsides to leaf.
So joy transforms to grief,
Nothing gold can stay.
Nothing gold can stay.
Nature's first green is gold
a
Her
h
ardest
h
ue to
h
old.
a
Her every leaf's a flower,
b
But only so an hour.
b
Then leaf subsides to leaf.
c
So joy transforms to grief.
c
So
d
awn goes
d
own to
d
ay.
d

Nothing gold can stay.
d
Rhyme pattern
aabbccdd
Alliteration falls on the stressed syllables of
lines 2 and 7
Nature is personified
as a woman
Iambic trimetre. Each line is consisted of three 'iambs,’ an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed one.
Metaphor is used to describe
nature's colours and characteristics
in lines 1 and 3
At first light, the sun's early rays bathe the entire landscape in hues of gold, for a brief time illuminating even the most plain of leaves. As day takes hold, the golden dawn recedes and nature retains its bland and common characteristics. The poem concludes that no golden beauty such as this can last forever.
Nothing Gold Can Stay
discusses much more than dawn, but is a broader metaphor which examines the temporary nature of one's heyday.
The cycle of day is compared to the circle of life, the golden moments of dawn representing fleeting, yet beautiful youth. The sun rises spectacularly and fades,
On a literal level, Frost's poem describes sunrise.
demonstrating the exuberance and joy of this period as it 'transforms to grief' (line 6) with age.
It may also be thought to reflect upon the transitory tendencies of happiness.
The poem concludes by surmising that no golden period is permanent, and because of this all opportunities must be embraced 'in the moment'.
Human experience is conveyed through the use of emotive and expressive language, but also through reflection upon the inevitable stages of life.
The final line of the poem conveys a real sense of sadness at the loss of one's youth, with darker undertones of regret and almost resent.
It is a reflection and sharing of human experience, calling the inexperienced to embrace the beauty of youth and 'seize the day'.
The final verse is an anticlimax, cryptically encouraging the audience to search for the deeper meaning within the poem.
Nature
's first
green
is
gold
Her hardest hue to hold.
Her every
leaf
's a
flower
,
But only so an hour.
Then leaf
subsides
to leaf.
So
joy

transforms
to
grief
.
So dawn goes
down
to day.
Nothing gold can stay.
Descriptive passages such as these make use of adjectives which assist in the formation of an image in the reader's mind.
Emotive language is used to evoke an emotional response in the audience.

Words

such as
joy
and
grief
achieve this.
The poem begins with fleeting scenes of joy, many of which subside. Dawn goes
down
to day, rather than rises, contributing to an anticlimax and darker sense at the poem's conclusion.
Full transcript