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Vocabulary Workshop - Level A - Unit 2 - Story

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by

Mrs. Angelette

on 13 March 2014

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Transcript of Vocabulary Workshop - Level A - Unit 2 - Story

Vocabulary Workshop - Level A - Unit 2 - Story
The Scrumptious Schoolyard is a grassroots program that transforms concrete playgrounds into functional farmland. Part of the Scrumptious Schoolyard Project, it is the brainchild of
contemporary
food-education pioneer Clarissa Z. Ochoa. Students explore the connection between what they eat and where it comes from through hands-on organic gardening and cooking classes. The "comestible curriculum"
encompasses
math, science, history, geography, social studies, and more.
Interviewer
: Rosa, you're a sixth grade student gardener in the Scrumptious Schoolyard at T. R. Middle School in West End. Have you tried growing anything before?
Interviewer
:
I heard that the Scrumptious Schoolyard concept was somewhat controversial in the beginning.
Rosa
: It
ruffled
a few feathers. Some people were
disinterested
, while others were suspicious,
depicting
it as playing instead of learning. I think their complaints are
groundless
and they really don't know what they're missing. It's amazing to watch something grow from a tiny seed. It takes a lot of
stamina
and enthusiasm to keep the gardens growing but everyone works together.
Interviewer
: What are some favorite experiences and things you've learned?
Rosa
: I was excited when the blossoms on the squashes and pumpkins appeared. We made pumpkin pancakes and sauteed zucchini blossoms, so I actually cooked and ate a flower! Rule number one for gardeners is smart planning and we need to get
maximum
use from our plot. Have you heard of companion planting? Plants are like people - some exist together better than others, so we
manipulate
plants, materials, and space to get the best harvest. We also extend the natural growing seasons by
mimicking
Mother Nature with grow lights and mini greenhouses.
West End School has Comestible Curriculum
Vocabulary Workshop - Level A - pages 22-23
Rosa
: No, this is my first time, and now I have a green thumb. I might become a farmer or a chef, or both!
Interviewer
: Have you encountered any stumbling blocks so far?
Rosa
: We develop tools and strategies for overcoming
adverse
conditions. Our climate isn't extremely
arid
, but sometimes it's pretty dry, so we practice water conservation by using rain barrels. Also, the first time we tried to make compost, it was unbelievably smelly. You have to get the ingredients and layers right. The second time, it turned out great. One of our teachers calls compost "black gold".
Interviewer
: Do you have a secret for attracting butterflies and bees to the garden?
Rosa
: We grow flowers that draw beneficial insects. Honeybees pollinate our plants, but the bees are in trouble because of Colony Collapse Disorder, so we try to do our part. Since our gardens are organic, we would be
hypocrites
if we used pesticides, so we're studying all-natural pest control. One raised bed has a
koinobori
, a Japanese fish kite that
billows
in the breeze and scares off scavengers.
Interviewer
: What would you say to other schools or kids interested in the program?
Rosa
:
Confront
obstacles and go for it! You may think one kid can't do much to help the environment or change how people eat, but working in the Scrumptious Schoolyard has made me believe we
can
make a big difference.
Interviewer
: Finally, I have to ask - do you really eat all the vegetables you're growing? I thought kids were supposed to hate vegetables.
Rosa
: There's no way I'm going to eat turnips. But it's good to try new things, according to my science teacher. We're still waiting to see
him
try turnips!
Full transcript