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Teen Pregnancy & Parenting

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by

Annabelle Bass

on 18 March 2014

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Transcript of Teen Pregnancy & Parenting

Effects of teen motherhood on children
Future & Employment
Education
What about the Child?
Less likely to:
- Finish high school
- 1 in 3
- Earn a college degree
- 1.5% earn a college degree by age 30





30% of teen girls that drop out of high school has to with pregnancy or parenthood.
Home Life
Tuesday,March 18, 2014
Vol XCIII, No. 311
Major Life Changes
How does it change the lifestyle of the Mom?
What about the Child?
Education
As Seen on TV?
Employment
Education
More likely to continue having kids
No longer has the support they once knew
Teen Pregnancy & Parenting
By:
Annabelle Bass, Baylie Wilson, Kate Meyer
Between 2009 and 2010, 48 % of mothers 15 to 19 lived below the poverty line.
63 % of teen mothers received public benefits within the first year after their children were born
Increased risk of becoming pregnant again


Nearly 80% of unmarried teen mothers end up on welfare.
They are less likely to marry and remain in stable relationships.
Future Endeavors & Education
Dependent on support system to aid in childcare & raising
Lack of stability & resources
Development can be slower
"Abuse is

13

times more

likely if the child is living with a mother who is living with a man."


"Abuse is

14

times more likely if the child is living with a biological mother who lives alone."
Behavior Issues
Potential Learning Disabilities from slowed development
School atmosphere disrupted


50% more likely:
to repeat a grade in school
perform lower on standardized tests
score worse on math & reading
drop out of school.

Daughters of teenage mothers are 3x more likely to become teenage mothers themselves
Children of teen mothers more likely to:
grow up poor
live in single-parent households
experience abuse and neglect
enter the child welfare system.



Parent- teacher communication & relationships can be affected
Classroom Dynamic?
Teachers can be used as a role model and support system
BIBLIOTHERAPY & VIDEO
Kerry, a Teenage Mother
By: Maggi Aitkens
Spellbound
By: Janet McDonald

Teen Guide to Single Parenting
By: Herma Silverstein
Movie: Coach Carter
Start at 10:45 until the end

Basch, C. E. (2011). Teen pregnancy and the achievement gap among urban minority youth.Journal of School Health, 81(10), 614-618.
Child abuse statistics. (n.d.). Retrieved from circleofmoms.com
Dye, J.L. (2008). Participation of mothers in government assistance pro- grams: 2004. Current Population Reports, 71-116. Washington, DC: US Census Bureau. Retrieved April 2012.
Haveman, R.H., Wolfe, B., & Peterson, E., (1997). Children of early childbearers as young adults,in Kids having kids: Economic costs and social costs of teen pregnancy,The Urban Institute Press: Washington, DC
Hoffman, S.D.(2006), By the numbers: the public costs of adolescent childbear- ing. The National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy Washington, DC.
11 facts about teen pregnancy. (n.d.). Retrieved from Dosomething.org
Ng, A. S., & Kaye, K. (2012). Why it matters: teen childbearing, education, and economic wellbeing. Washington, DC: The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy.
Weiss, J. A. (2012). Who will listen? rural teen pregnancy reflections.The Journal for Nurse Practitioners, 8(10), 804-809.
Works Cited
Case Study
In Florida 125 students, ages 15, 16, and 17, were given a timed a essay on whether they thought teen pregnancy was a problem in their community. The essays were submitted anonymously, giving only their gender and age.

“Everywhere I look in high school, either someone is pregnant or has had a kid”

- Both females (34) and males (7) wrote that pregnancy could “mess up” or “ruin” teens lives.

- “A child being raised by another child is never a good thing.”

Who Will Listen?
Rural Teen Pregnancy Reflections
Peer relationships
Full transcript