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VIUF: Why A Almost Never Leads to B

on April 12, 2018
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on 2 November 2018

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Transcript of VIUF: Why A Almost Never Leads to B

Why A Almost Never Leads to B
The Realities of Modern Career Launch

That's a
wrap
!
and that's a
sandwich
...
and that's a
wiener dog in a bun
.
GAME
TIME!
Theory of Retention
enjoys “near paradigmatic status”
emphasizes the role the institution plays in supporting retention
initiatives should be
integrated
(not add-ons)
importance of
positive student interactions
, particularly in 1st year
frustrated that work has not translated into more effective practice
Argue for
integrated use of an institution’s resources
in education of the ‘whole student’

Call for
greater collaboration
between academic and student affairs units

Transformative education
exposes students to opportunities for intentional learning – inside & outside the classroom

Emphasis on
learning outcomes
Broader view of what is considered
educationally valuable
and
who contributes
to learning

Explicit references to
value
of experiential education

Movement to
identifying learning outcomes
, many with explicit career orientations
Seven Guidelines
for the Shaping of Best Practice in Retention
:
Braxton, Brier & Steele (2007)

Those who teach or advise undergrad students should
embrace an abiding concern for the career developments
of those students

Respect students by
being appropriately sensitive
to their needs and concerns

Develop and foster a
culture of enforced student success
Involve faculty members
in programs and activities

Practice
institutional integrity

Foster the development of
student affinity groups and friendships

Select and implement
retention interventions
described in the literature
Student
Engagement
and
Retention
1500 institutions across North America since 2000
engagement data serves as proxies for student learning
collects information in five categories: Student behaviours; institutional requirements; reactions to the institution; student background; and self-reported growth
identified
19 "educationally purposeful activities"
that are positively related to
first-year student grades
and by persistence between the first and second of year of college

"talked about career plans with a faculty member or advisor"

"participated in a community-based project"
Development involves
the change that occurs in students
as they “encounter increasing complexity in ideas, values, and other people”
Theory of Involvement
suggests that the amount of learning or development is directly proportional to the quality and quantity of involvement

Though all involvement is important,
interactions with peers and faculty members
have the most impact on development
Students’ perception of a supportive environment
in which faculty and university staff provided academic and non-academic support was the greatest indicator of academic competence

“the vast majority of the explained variance in academic competence is attributable to
what happened to students during their first year
and not to the characteristics they brought with them to college”
(2004 - National Assn of Student Personnel Administrators (
NASPA
) & American College Personnel Assn (
ACPA
)
Returning to Kuh's '
Educationally Purposeful Activities
'...
KUH
,

2010


“it’s high time we
look for ways to use [the] work experience to enrich
rather than detract from learning and college completion”

“few promise to deliver as much bang for the buck as
making work more relevant to learning
, and vice versa”

TINTO (
integration and interaction
):

"while many institutions tout the importance of increasing student retention, not enough have taken student retention seriously…. They are willing to append retention efforts to their ongoing activities, but much less willing to
alter those activities in ways that address the deeper roots of student attrition
"
(
1
) depth and breadth of knowledge
(
2
) knowledge of methodologies
(
3
) application of knowledge
(
4
) communication skills
(
5
) awareness of limits of knowledge
(
6
) autonomy and professional capacity

Engaging Research
To be a world leader in knowledge mobilization building on a strong foundation of fundamental research.

Engaging Communities
To be Canada’s most community-engaged research university.
45% of students who dropped out in year one earned admission with “A” averages and another 40% earned admission with “B” averages (Conway, 2001)
Why do
students
choose to attend
university
?

Tony Botelho, Simon Fraser University
@Tony_Botelho



Canadian Policy Research Networks, 2006
Call for development of "
ideal set of attributes
":
*greater alignment with Blueprint and Essential Skills
Three
overarching goals:
Engaging Students
To equip SFU students with the knowledge, skills, and experiences that prepare them for life in an ever-changing and challenging world.
*preparation for "ever-changing and challenging world" consistent with Blueprint and emergent career theories
Education level is the strongest correlate of employment and income levels.


Statistics Canada, 2010
The Research Universities'
Council of British Columbia, 2014
of 25 year olds

maintain the same career
expectations they had when they were 17
Career decision-making patterns of Canadian youth and associated postsecondary educational outcomes, 2000 to 2010 (StatsCan, 2015)
16.5 %

Just over half
of Canadian university graduates had jobs closely related to their field of study, two years after graduation
(Bourdarbat and Montmarquette, 2009)
What percentage of 25-year-olds are
pursuing the same career
they were when they were 17?
Career Theories and Frameworks
Student Engagement & Retention - Quick Review
Analysis of SFU Initiatives
About the Presenter
Career & Volunteer Services (9+ yrs)

Co-operative Education (9+ yrs)

Disability Services in Post Secondary (7yrs)

M.A. in Education (2012): "Career Education in the Age of Engagement"


Tony
BOTELHO
Penmanship Award in grades four AND five
Our
context...

Renewed undergrad emphasis happening across the country despite the fact that
critiques have been "ignored or discounted" by most universities
for the last two decades.
- Marshall, 2011
- Canadian University Survey Consortium, 2016
What you
already know
...
5 years after leaving school:

4.7 percent unemployment rate

96% working in jobs that require a post-secondary degree
BC University Grads
Class of 2008
http://blog-en.heqco.ca/2015/09/edudata-where-do-university-graduates-work-in-ontario/
Where do
graduates work
?
Theories

&

Frameworks
Chaos Theory
of Careers,
Bright & Pryor
Happenstance Learning
Theory,
Krumboltz
Blueprint
for Life/Work Designs
Essential Skills
Framework
Individuals are
complex
and
dynamical systems
acting within a matrix of other complex dynamical systems

Change
and
chance
are integrated realities of existence

Encourage individuals to
embrace uncertainty

Small changes can have major impact
; large changes can have minor impact
Human behaviour is the product of
planned
and
unplanned learning situations

Goal of career support is to
help clients take actions

Actions can generate
beneficial unplanned events
Making a
career decision
used to be the goal.
It should no longer be the goal
. We have no way of recommending what anyone's future occupation should be. The
world is changing too fast
for us to be sure what occupations will exist tomorrow.
Krumboltz, 2011
1.Reading
2.Document Use
3.Numeracy
4.Writing
5.Oral Communication
6.Working with Others
7.Thinking
8.Computer Use
9.Continuous Learning
"
"
Wondering
Where
Your Degree Might Take You?
What do they have
in common
?

Can you
identify
the following historical figures?
ONE FOCUS
?
SEEKING
SEVERAL POSSIBILITIES
Career development programming
reduces numbers of dropouts

(both at the secondary and post-secondary level)...
by assisting youth in seeing the relevancy of their learning
as it is tied to pathways to the labour market

National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE)
KUH
CHICKERING
ASTIN
TINTO
REASON, TERENZINI, & DOMINGO
BC Study on Early Leavers
Notable
Connections
Between
Student Engagement/Retention
&
Career Development
CHICKERING (
student development
):

"We need
collaborative relationships
not only with the world of business, but with community organizations and volunteer programs. Such integration will help students develop knowledge, competence, and personal characteristics that will persist for a lifetime.
ASTIN (
involvement
):

“if we
create opportunities for students to interact
and learn together in an academic environment, some good things will happen…. While it is not always possible to know beforehand just what these good things will be, the students seldom disappoint us”
Learning Reconsidered
Notable Influence
The Role of
Chance
What percentage of people say their career was influenced by
chance
events?
69%
of students reported that chance events influenced their career decision


Making a career decision used to be the goal.
It should no longer be the goal.
We have no way of recommending what anyone’s future occupation should be. The world is changing too fast for us even to be sure what occupations will exist tomorrow.
1
3
2
Wisdom From Our
Alumni
...
Thank you
!
@Tony_Botelho
botelho@sfu.ca
Numerous "participant" ribbons

I am
more likely to get a job
with a degree -- 91%

To
get a more fulfilling job
than I probably would if I didn't go -- 90%

To
prepare for a specific job or career
-- 90%


To satisfy my
intellectual curiosity
-- 80%

Learning new things
is exciting -- 80%


To
apply what I will learn to make a positive difference
in society or my community -- 78%

To get a
broad education
-- 78%

To
earn more money
than if I didn't go -- 73%
(~1 in 6)
Also:
38.3% have a new direction at age 25
Change,
Chance
& Complexity
MAJOR JOB
Art
Asian American Studies
Chemistry
Economics
English
Geography
Government
Psychology
Cartoonist
Teaching ESL in Korea
Veterinarian
Bond Trader on Wall Street
Editor, Major Publishing House
High School Geography Teacher
Special Prosecutor
Psychotherapist
MAJOR JOB
Art
Asian American Studies
Chemistry
Economics
English
Geography
Government
Psychology
Special Prosecutor
Bond Trader on Wall Street
Teaching ESL in Korea
Psychotherapist
Veterinarian
Editor, Major Publishing House
High School Geography Teacher
Cartoonist
June 2014
$105.79
Statista.com
Bright, Pryor, & Harpham, 2005
Krumboltz, 2011
There are two fundamental and complementary ways of achieving personal change: you can
take action
and you can
change your mind
.
Pryor & Bright, 2011. The Chaos Theory of Careers:
A New Perspective on Working in the Twenty-First Century
OUTCOMES OF ACTION
Continue
Rethink
Expand
New types of opportunities keep coming up....
App Developer

Social Media Manager

Sustainability Manager

Cloud Computing Specialist

Big Data Analyst

YouTube Content Creator

Green Funeral Home Director

et cetera, et cetera
Please
stand.

Length of time
to complete a degree

Transformative
curriculum and experiences

Changes in
the world
(and decisions of others)

Changes continue in
themselves
Why All The
Change
(for students)
Our View of Career Support
university is a
5-6 year career exploration
experience
almost any degree can lead
to almost any occupation
aim is to support
clarity and intentionality
- focus on non-classroom actions
not everyone needs to see us
, but university could provide better support
Adapted from: Brooks, K., 2010. You Majored in What? Mapping Your Path from Chaos to Career.
One more
Moving Forward...
Taking
Action
on Possibilities
1. Do Research

2. Gain Experience

3. Connect with People
trainugly.com
CURIOSITY
PERSISTENCE
FLEXIBILITY
RISK TAKING
OPTIMISM
Exploring new opportunities
Exerting effort despite hurdles
Being open to changing your attitude and circumstances
Not being afraid to try something even if you are afraid how it will turn out
View opportunities as possible and attainable
Planned Happenstance Competencies
Mitchell, Levin, & Krumboltz, 1999
(time permitting)
Full transcript