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Samohi Restorative Justice in Schools

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by

Kimmy Maniquis

on 8 September 2015

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Transcript of Samohi Restorative Justice in Schools

Restorative Justice
What is the Default in School Discipline?
5 Different Positions of Control Used with Students (by Diane Gossen)
What is Restorative Justice?
"If crime is a wound, justice should be healing."
-Howard Zehr
Restorative Justice requires a paradigm shift
School Discipline Asks:

1. What rule was broken?

2. Who broke it?

3. What punishment is warranted?
Restorative Justice requires a paradigm shift
Restorative Justice Asks:

1. Who was harmed?

2. What are the needs and responsibilities of those affected?

3. How do all affected parties address needs and repair harm?

Pair Share
THANK YOU!

California Conference for Equality and Justice (CCEJ)
www.cacej.org
562.435.8184

The Punisher: Yells and points
The Guilter: Preaches and "shoulds"
The Mentor: Asks questions
The Buddy: Makes excuses for student
The Monitor: Counts and measures
How does Restorative Justice work?
Elements of Every Circle
Opening
Introduction of talking piece
Community guidelines
Check-in
Discussion Rounds
Check-out
Closing

Circle Practice
Role of the Circle Keeper
Mentor and teacher
Self aware—know who you are, who your circle members are, and the culture you are in. Think about: what are your expectations, assumptions and values?
Impart knowledge
Role model of values
Able to hold the group, the emotions, the stories
Comfortable with ambiguity, seeing and hearing over and under and in between
Able to hold silence
Knows who to invite into circle
Patience
Using Circle in the Classroom
Advisory/Homeroom
Set aside 1 day a week
Explain the theory and practice of RJ to your students
Set community guidelines
Spend several weeks building community with “getting acquainted” questions
Substantive Classes
Determine your consistent practice
Every day for 10 minutes?
Once a week for 30 minutes?
Explain the theory and practice of RJ to your students
Set community guidelines
Use it quickly for check-ins regularly
Implement longer reflection or learning circles
monthly

Other Uses of Circles
Teacher meetings

Administrator meetings

Parent meetings

School-wide discussions on anti-oppression issues

Addressing conflict

As an alternative to suspensions/expulsions

Reflect on a time you
were harmed as an educator.
What was the situation?
How did it affect you short term? Long term?
Can you speculate as to the perspective of the person that harmed you?
What became of that situation?
What could the person have done to make it right?
What would you like to say to that person?
What were your needs at the time?
Reflect on a time
when you harmed someone
as an educator.
What was the situation?
How did you feel after?
How do you think the person felt right after? Long term?
What became of that situation?
What could you/did you do to make it right?
Can you forgive yourself?
What were your needs at the time?
Santa Monica High School
"Educating the mind without
educating the heart is no
education at all."
-Aristotle
Full transcript