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Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night

Gladden Poetry Presentation
by

Ashley Harper

on 4 January 2013

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Transcript of Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night

By: Dylan Thomas Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night
By: Dylan Thomas
My poet:
Dylan Thomas Interesting facts about my poet Diction Analysis Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night Rhythm Explication Rhyme Explication Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rave at close of day;
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Those wise men at their end know dark is right,
Because their words had forked no lighting they
Do night do not go gentle into that good night.

Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright
Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,
And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way,
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight
Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

And you, my father, there on the sad height,
Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray.
Do not go gentle into that good night.
Rage, rage against the dying of the light. The meaning of the title refers to life and how you should embrace every moment. Life doesn't last forever, and even in your sickly, old days you should still keep fighting to stay alive. He wrote this poem for his dying father.
The theme is living and strength, it could also be the intensity of family
The speaker could also be Dylan Thomas considering he wrote the poem for his father that was dying.
The tone of the poem shows a lot of emotion. The speaker showed pain of seeing his father's health decline. Yet he was telling others to embrace your life and make it count while you can.
The importance of this poem is just telling people to live life while you can. Work hard and stay stong, don't give up even when you're old. The speaker is putting the message out there to keep fighting because you only have one chance at life. Don't go gentle.


The speaker's diction is very careful. The first line he uses the title "Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night" means do not give up easily. He also says "rage against the dying of the light," which means even though wise men know that they cannot keep death away forever and especially if they have not accomplished their goals in life, they don’t accept death easily; they “Do not go gentle . . . .” Instead of being blunt, he carefully words how he wants his father to stay stong and not die.


Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rave at close of day;
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Those wise men at their end know dark is right,
Because their words had forked no lighting they
Do night do not go gentle into that good night.

Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright
Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,
And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way,
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight
Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

And you, my father, there on the sad height,
Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray.
Do not go gentle into that good night.
Rage, rage against the dying of the light. Left school at 16 to become a reporter and writer
Married with two kids
Died from alcoholism at the age of 39
Dylan Thomas wrote this poem as a villanelle. It consists of five stanzas, with three lines in each. Rhyming with the first line and last line of the first stanza alternating as the last lines of the following stanza, until a final quatrain where they form the concluding couplet. The alternation and repetition of lines, together with the strict rhyme scheme, and largely iambic rhythm create a sorrowful and mournful rhythm. The poem begins with a plea against giving in to the night, a metaphor used for death. The first line carries the bitter irony of going ‘gently’ to one’s “good” end. The death will not easily claim the life before him. The speaker doesn’t want death to be the end and feels it should be battled against with all one’s might and will, even in old age. Rhyme Scheme aba
aba
aba
aba
aba
abaa "The dying of the light" is a metaphor for death because like sleep, everything looks dark. "That good night" symbolizes heaven or the peace of sleep. "...who see with blinding sight" is an irony because blind means you can't see. Figurative Language
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