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Sonnet 43 Lesson 1, 2 and 3

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Mr Woods

on 15 January 2017

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Transcript of Sonnet 43 Lesson 1, 2 and 3

What type of poem would use words like these? Would it be funny/sad/happy/romantic?
Learning Outcomes
Aspire: to be able to evaluate the effectiveness of poetic features of a poem and begin to create a personal response.

Challenge: to be able to identify the content of the poem and begin to comment on the language choices of the poet.
Elizabeth Barrett Browing
How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of being and ideal grace.
I love thee to the level of every day’s
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.
I love thee freely, as men strive for right.
I love thee purely, as they turn from praise.
I love thee with the passion put to use
In my old griefs, and with my childhood’s faith.
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
With my lost saints. I love thee with the breath,
Smiles, tears, of all my life; and, if God choose,
I shall but love thee better after death.
Sonnet 43
"Thinking Out Loud"

When your legs don't work like they used to before
And I can't sweep you off of your feet
Will your mouth still remember the taste of my love?
Will your eyes still smile from your cheeks?

And, darling, I will be loving you 'til we're 70
And, baby, my heart could still fall as hard at 23
And I'm thinking 'bout how people fall in love in mysterious ways
Maybe just the touch of a hand
Well, me - I fall in love with you every single day
And I just wanna tell you I am

So honey now
Take me into your loving arms
Kiss me under the light of a thousand stars
Place your head on my beating heart
I'm thinking out loud
Maybe we found love right where we are

When my hair's all but gone and my memory fades
And the crowds don't remember my name
When my hands don't play the strings the same way (mmm...)
I know you will still love me the same

'Cause honey your soul could never grow old, it's evergreen
And, baby, your smile's forever in my mind and memory
I'm thinking 'bout how people fall in love in mysterious ways
Maybe it's all part of a plan
Well, I'll just keep on making the same mistakes
Hoping that you'll understand

That, baby, now
Take me into your loving arms
Kiss me under the light of a thousand stars
Place your head on my beating heart
Thinking out loud
Maybe we found love right where we are (oh ohh)

As you watch the video and listen to the lyrics answer the questions on your sheet:
Ed Sheeran loves his girlfriend.
Left if you agree. Right if you disagree.
Ed Sheeran will love his girlfriend for a long time.
Ed Sheeran thinks negatively about love.
Ed Sheeran says "your smile's forever in my mind and memory" because he does not think about his girlfriend.
Write down what the word "purely" suggests about this poem. Write down any other words it makes you think of.
1806-1861
One of the most important English poets of the Victorian Era.
Sonnet 43 was written for her future husband, Robert Browning.
Her father fiercely opposed the relationship; they eloped to Italy to get married and her father never spoke to her again.
Underline any words/phrases that are repeated in this poem.
Why did Elizabeth Browning repeat herself so much?
Browning wants the reader to see how much she loves her husband by repeating the words "I love thee." This repetition shows...
Underline any words that you think are religious.
The poet uses religious imagery because...
Count from 1 to 10
You are not allowed to signal intent (say or show people when you will say a number).

If more than one person calls the same number, the sequencing must start again.

Anyone can shout out a number at any time.

You are only allowed to say a number once.
Learning Outcomes
Put your Sonnet 43 poem away.
Listen as I read the poem to you.
Now have a go at writing down as much as you can remember from the poem.
What did you find easy to remember?
How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.
I love thee to the level of everyday's
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.
I love thee freely, as men strive for Right;
I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.
I love thee with the passion put to use
In my old griefs, and with my childhood's faith.
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
With my lost saints,—I love thee with the breath,
Smiles, tears, of all my life!—and, if God choose,
I shall but love thee better after death.
"da-DUM da-DUM da-DUM da-DUM da-DUM" – "How
do
I
love
thee?
Let
me
count
the
ways
."
1
2
3
4
5
6
How many ways? What does each way tell you something about her love?
7
8
9
10
11
Spider Diagram Our Knowledge
Sonnet 43
What images are created in the poem?
How is the structure of the poem important?
How does the poet feel about the person they are writing to?
What is your personal response to this poem?
Write down your personal response then choose another question to spider diagram from the questions below:
"Depth and breadth and height" - think of a cube.
"The ends of Being and ideal Grace" - her entire body and life loves her husband.
"Every day’s most quiet need" - even when it's quiet and not much going on I still need you.
"as men strive for right" - Men choose to do the right thing.
"purely, as they turn from praise" - It is pure to be humble compared to being arrogant.
"Passion put to use in my old griefs" - my energy I used for anger I now use for love.
"My childhood’s faith" - when I was a child I believed everything without ever questioning anything.
"My lost saints" - people that I used to admire have lost my respect.
"I shall but love thee better after death" - I will always love you, even if one of us dies.
Aspire: to be able to evaluate the effectiveness of poetic features of a poem and to analyse the poetic choices used in the poem.

Challenge: to be able to consolidate the content of the poem and begin to create a personal response to the poem.

Use the images to help you write your ECZS paragraphs on paper. Write one paragraph about imagery and another on the structure of the poem.
Swap books and tick where they have described the structure and where they have described imagery in the poem.
Write down what you would feel like if you had an assessment on poetry today?
Write down how you would structure your response.
Learning Outcomes
Aspire: to be able to evaluate a mark scheme and to create a structured response to a poem.

Challenge: to be able to identify what an assessment needs and apply this to your own writing.

Example
What will you be marked on?
We should create our own mark scheme so we know what to do for the assessment.
Context
Comment
Evidence
Zoom
Stretch
Key Ideas
Language
Structure
Form
Now we will create an example paragraph for an idea below
Now in 15 minutes see how much you can achieve. This is your chance to impress yourself.
Swap Assessments and use the Mark Scheme we have created to mark each other's work.
Then give a PIN mark underneath.

P: Have they ticked all the boxes? Have they used a PEE structure in each paragraph?

I: Always check spelling and grammar.

N: What do they still need to do in the full assessment. What can they do even better next time.
Spelling Time!
Hard Harder

Metaphor Authority
Sonnet Personification
Repetition Rhythm
Delight Detrimental
Revolve Convenience
Rehearse Argument
Permitted Euphemism
Fierce Revolution
Confinement Restrictions
Hearse Juxtaposition
Full transcript