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Plagiarism: Just the Basics

A Basic Primer on When to Cite Sources
by

Rebecca Richardson

on 1 May 2012

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Transcript of Plagiarism: Just the Basics

Plagiarism:
the Basics
What is plagiarism?
EXAMPLE, PLEASE!
It is raining outside.
Don't cite. This is what is
called "Common Knowledge."
It is something you just know.
The collection of Stratus clouds
indicate that it won't rain
after all.
Cite this.
While you can see the clouds outside, how do you know what kind of clouds they are and what they predict?
In Text:
The collection of Stratus clouds
indicate that it won't rain after all. (Mogil 22).
How it should look in MLA
In Works Cited:
Mogil, H. Michael. "Cloud Watching From 35,000 Feet." Weatherwise 61.3 (2008): 22. Middle Search Plus. Web. 30 Apr. 2012.
In Works Cited:
Mogil, H. Michael. "Cloud Watching From 35,000 Feet." Weatherwise 61.3 (2008): 22. Middle Search Plus. Web. 30 Apr. 2012.
According to Mogil, "Altocumulus and stratocululus are often filled with water droplets."
Cite this! This is a direct quote and you must give credit to the author.
According to Mogil, "Altocumulus and stratocululus are often filled with water droplets" (29).
It is using someone else's words or ideas as your own (without giving them credit).
It is not giving proper citations (or credit) when using someone else's words or ideas.
With a little MLA Style thrown in for good measure
How it should look in MLA:
In Text:
Weatherwise in the citation should be italicized, but the program will not allow it.
Weatherwise in the citation should be italicized, but the program will not allow it
Questions?
Is this information that you already knew? Is this information
that your readers will have already known?
Is this information that you
learned from doing your research?
Is this information exactly
what the author said?
If you answered, "Yes!" to either of the last two questions you need to give the author credit.
If you are in doubt, CITE!
To use someone else's thoughts, ideas
or words, even unintentionally, is plagiarism!
Nearly every school / university has an
academic honestly policy. To plagiarize is to
violate this policy and can result in a failing
grade or even expulsion from your school.
Now...get to writing!
And, remember, if you
have any questions ask your teacher or your librarian!
Becky Richardson
Murray State University
2012
Full transcript